Ivydene Gardens Colour Wheel - Foliage Gallery:
Site Map

Click on 1 of 48 Colours in
Colour Wheel below with the
Black, Silver, Gray, White 1, White 2 for Cultivated Foliage or White Wildflower for White UK Wildflowers
in any page in this gallery to get that Foliage Colour Page and then select 1 from 2147 plants using the Thumbnail and its corresponding text links above it
before clicking on its Botanical Name to get its Description Page:-

 

If all else fails, it might be worth reading

Plant Care may aid you in keeping your newly planted plants healthy and growing.

 

PLANT USE AND FLOWER SHAPE GALLERY PAGES

 

This Gallery compares the use and flower shape of plants in this website combined with those already compared in
Bedding, Bulb, Evergreen Perennial, Herbaceous Perennial and Roses pages as linked to in the table at the end of this page.
 

PLANTS FLOWER SHAPE GALLERY PAGES

lessershapemeadowrue2a1a1a1a1a1a1a

alliumcflohaireasytogrowbulbs1a1a1a1

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14c2a1a1a1a1a

irisflotpseudacorus1a1a1a1a1a

aethionemacfloarmenumfoord1a2a1a1a1

anemonecflo1hybridafoord1a2a1a1a1

anemonecflo1blandafoord1a1a1a1a1

Number of Flower Petals

Petal-less

1

2

3

4

5

Above 5

 

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a1a1a1a1a1

alliumcflo1roseumrvroger1a1a1a

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

paeoniamlokosewitschiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1

paeoniaveitchiiwoodwardiiflot1a1a1a1a1

acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord1a1a1a1a1a

stachysflotmacrantha1a1a1a1a1a

Flower Shape - Simple

Stars with Single Flowers

Bowls

Cups and Saucers

Globes

Goblets and Chalices

Trumpets

Funnels

 

digitalismertonensiscflorvroger1a2a1a1a1

fuchsiaflotcalicehoffman1a1a1a1a1a

ericacarneacflosspringwoodwhitedeeproot1a1a1a1a1a1

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming1a1a1a1a1a

Rose Petal Count from Rose Use Gallery
 

Single:
1-7 Petals

Semi-Double:
8-15 Petals
 

Flower Shape - Simple

Bells

Thimbles

Urns

Salver-form

Double:
Page 1
,
Page 2
16-25 Petals

Full:
26-40 Petals

Very Full:
40+ Petals

 

prunellaflotgrandiflora1a1a1a1a1

aquilegiacfloformosafoord1a2a1a1a

acanthusspinosuscflocoblands1a2a1a1a

lathyrusflotvernus1a2a1a1a

anemonecflo1coronariastbrigidgeetee1a1a1a

echinaceacflo1purpurealustrehybridsgarnonswilliams1a2a1a1a

centaureacfloatropurpureakavanagh1a1a1a1a

Flower Shape - Elabor-ated

Tubes, Lips and Straps

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Hats, Hoods and Helmets

Stan-dards, Wings and Keels

Discs and Florets

Pin-Cushions

Tufts and Petal-less Cluster

 

androsacecforyargongensiskevock1a1a1a1

androsacecflorigidakevock1a1a1a1

argyranthemumflotcmadeiracrestedyellow1a1b1a1

armeriacflomaritimakevock1a1a1a1

anemonecflonemerosaalbaplenarvroger1a1a1a1

Rose Bloom Shape from Rose Use Gallery

High-Centred,

Cupped,
 

Flower Shape - Elabor-ated

Cushion

Umbel

Buttons with Double Flowers

Pompoms

Stars with Semi-Double Flowers

Flat,

Globular,
 

Pompon,

Rosette

 

bergeniamorningredcforcoblands1a1a1a1a1

ajugacfloreptansatropurpurea1a1a1a1a

lamiumflotorvala2a1a1a1a1

astilbepurplelancecflokevock1a1a1a1a1

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a1433a1a1a1a1a1a1

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a1434a1a1a1a1a1a1

androsacecfor1albanakevock1a1a1a1a

Natural Arrange-ments

Bunches, Posies and Sprays (Group)

Columns, Spikes and Spires

Whorls, Tiers and Cande-labra

Plumes and Tails

Chains and Tassels

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades

Sphere, Dome (Clusters), Drumstick and Plate

Plant Use

BEDDING OUT and Bedding Out of Roses

BEDDING for Filling In

BEDDING for Screening

BEDDING for Pots and Troughs

BEDDING in Window Boxes

BEDDING in Hanging Baskets

BEDDING Foliage

BEDDING
Spring

Summer

Winter

Foliage Only

Other Than Green Foliage
 

Trees in Lawn

Trees in Small Gardens
 

Wildflower Garden

Attract Bird Attract Butterfly 1, 2
 

Climber on House Wall

Climber not on House Wall

Climber in Tree

Rabbit-Resistant

Wood-land

Pollution Barrier

Part Shade

Full Shade

Single Flower provides Pollen for Bees
1
, 2, 3

Ground-Cover
<60
cm
60-180cm
>180cm

Hedge

Wind-swept

Covering Banks

Patio Pot

Edging Borders

Back of Border

Poisonous

Adjacent to Water

Bog Garden

Tolerant of Poor Soil

Winter-Flowering
 

Fragrant

Not Fragrant

Exhibition

Standard Plant is 'Ball on Stick'

Upright Branches or Sword-shaped leaves

Plant to Prevent Entry to Human or Animal

Tolerant of Coastal Con-ditions

Tolerant on North-facing Wall

Cut Flower

Potted Veg Outdoors

Potted Veg Indoors
 

Thornless

Raised Bed Outdoors Veg
 

Grow in Alkaline Soil A-F, G-L, M-R, S-Z

Grow in Acidic Soil

Grow in Any Soil

Grow in Rock Garden

Grow Bulbs Indoors

 

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item78a1a1a1a1

item80a1a1a1a1

Click on Foliage Colour above Colour Name to compare foliage of same colour and different plant types or 1,
then 2, 3, or 4 for following pages

item81a1a1a1a1

item82a1a1a1a1

item83a1a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White 1, 2

 

White 3

 

White Wild-flower 1, 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gray

 

Silver
1
, 2

Black

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item87a1a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

105

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item60a1a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item95a1a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blood Red 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item89a1a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dried Blood
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chocolate 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

item62a1a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item97a1a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

item51b1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fuzzy Wuzzy 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item103a1a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item91a1a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forbidden
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heatland 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Royal Purple
1

 

 

item53b1a1a1

 

 

item64a1a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item99a1a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item105a1a1a1a1

 

 

 

Rusty Pelican
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red 1, 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item93a1a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Calihoe
1

item55a1a1a1a

Process Pagenta
1

Orange
1

item107a1a1a1a1

Tuscany
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item66a1a1a1a

 

 

item101a1a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flat Pink
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magenta
1

item57a1a1a1a

 

 

 

 

item109a1a1a1a1

 

Vitamin C 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pink
1
, 2

 

Orangelin
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

104

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

101

item43b1a1a1

item45b1a1a1

item47b1a1a1

item49b1a1a1

Magenta Shift
1

Atomic Tangerine
1

item117a1a1a1a1

item115a1a1a1a1

item113a1a1a1a1

item111a1a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Violet
1

The Bands
1

Grape
1

Mauve
1

item41b1a1a1

item10b1a1a1

Sand
1

Tang-erine
1

Buddha Gold
1

Browser Caramel 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item39b1a1a1

Off-White Blue
1

Bone
1
, 2

item8b1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item33b1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

item18b1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item37b1a1a1

 

 

Blue
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yellow
1
, 2

 

item5b1a2a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baby Blue
1

 

 

 

 

 

Lime-ade
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item31b1a2a1

 

item26b1a1a1

 

item16b1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

item35b1a1a1

 

 

 

Periwinkle 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pine Glade
1

 

 

 

item3a1a2a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Light Teal
1

 

Offwhite Green 1

 

Lovely Lime
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Navy Blue
1

item30b1a1a1

item24b1a1a1

item14b1a1a1

Grass Stain
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

103

 

Aqua
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lime 1

 

 

 

Slimer 2
1

 

102

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item28b1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item22b1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item12b1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue Stone
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weak Green 1

 

 

 

Verdun Green
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item20b1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pakistan Green 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item109a1a1a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item109a1a1a1a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item109a1a1a1a1a1b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multi-coloured
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Variegated White/ Green
1

 

 

 

 

 

Variegated Yellow/Green
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you have reached the required Flower Colour Page, then click on Flowering Months of the required plant to compare this flower with others from the same Plant Type - Bulbs, Climbers, Evergreen perennials - in that month OR with others from the plants at RHS Wisley in that month.

 

Dark Tone or Shades (Colours mixed with Black) is the outer circle of colours.


Mid-Tone (Colours mixed with Grey) is the next circle of colours.


Pure Hue (the Primary, Secondary or Tertiary Colour named) is the next circle of colours.


Pastel (Colours mixed with White) is the innermost circle of colours.

These 12 colour spokes of
Dark Tone,
Mid-Tone,
Pure Hue and
Pastel are split into:-

Number

Primary Colour Name

Pure Hue Colour Name Used

1

Red

Red

2

Yellow

Yellow

3

Blue

Blue

Number

Secondary Colour Name

Pure Hue Colour Name Used

10

Orange

Vitamin C

11

Green

Lime

12

Violet

Magenta

Number

Tertiary Colour Name

Pure Hue Colour Name Used

100

Red Orange

Orange

101

Yellow Orange

Tangerine

102

Yellow Green

Lovely Lime

103

Blue Green

Light Teal

104

Blue Violet

Grape

105

Red Violet

Process Pagenta

The Introduction Page of the Plants Topic provides a system of how to choose your plants for your garden with the following diagram to create a suitable list of plants:-

plantselectionprocedure2

 

 

 

 

Click inside yellow box to link to that Page in Plants Topic for that list of plants

 

Click inside green box to link to
that
Photo Gallery Site Map Page,
then
view its Index Pages for lists of plants
or
view flower colour per month comparison pages using its links on their flower colour per month Colour Wheel, followed by clicking on thumbnail to review its added Plant Description Page.

The above Galleries contain the Index Pages listing all the plants in their respective Sub-Galleries. The Sub-Galleries - besides containing the relevant Plant Description Pages (links to each in the Site Map of each Sub-Gallery) - also compare the flower colour, foliage colour, habit/shape, fruit/seeds and in flowerbeds/landscape.

In addition to the above method of choosing plants is the following:-

  • The Flower Colour Wheel in this Gallery has collections of different types of plant with the same colour from 1 of the 53 colours of flower petal on the same page, so that could be added to the top of the above diagram like the Bee-Pollinated or Rabbit-resistant criteria to get the same, complementary or contrasting flower colour. There is a link to its Description Page by clicking:-
    • Botanical Plant Name,
    • or clicking Flowering Months to compare the same flower colour in each month of all in that same type of plant, then clicking the thumbnail to add the Description Page. Each Text Description below each of the Thumbnails in those Comparison Pages gives you the:-
      • soil type it prefers,
      • plant name,
      • sun aspect,
      • soil moisture in the background colour and
      • height of the plant in the border colour of that plant.
  • For Hay Fever sufferers, it is better to have bee-pollinated plants than wind-pollinated plants, since the pollen spread by that wind is what causes their suffering. The plants in the Bee-Pollinated Bloom Gallery are bee-pollinated and they should be used in preference to grasses etc when using the selection procedure above - the Bee-Pollinated Page in Plants can also be used. The 264 bee-pollinated plants in the Bee-Pollinated Index pages are in addition to the bee-pollinated plants shown as thumbnails in the comparison pages of the 12 Flower Colours per month FROM its Colour Wheel of the Bee-Pollinated Bloom Gallery.
  • The All Flowers per Month Gallery complements the Flower Colour Wheel gallery by having the flower photo in each month of one of the following petal colours that that plant flowers; then a link to its Description Page by clicking on that Thumbnail:-
    • Blue
    • Brown
    • Cream
    • Green
    • Mauve
    • Orange
    • Pink
    • Purple
    • Red
    • Unusual and Multi-Coloured - multi-coloured in each flower and/or different flower colours
    • White
    • Yellow.
    • Each Text Description below each of the Thumbnails in those Comparison Pages gives you the:-
      • soil type it prefers,
      • plant name,
      • sun aspect,
      • soil moisture in the background colour,
      • plant type,
      • months of flowering and
      • height of the plant in the border colour of that plant.
  • The All Foliage Gallery has collections of different types of plant with the same colour from the 212 colours of mature foliage on the same page to produce the same, complementary or contrasting mature foliage colour lists. Each Text Description below each of the Thumbnails in those Comparison Pages gives you the:-
    • soil type it prefers,
    • plant name,
    • sun aspect,
    • soil moisture in the background colour,
    • plant type,
    • months of flowering and
    • height of the plant in the border colour of that plant.
  • The All Spring Foliage, All Summer Foliage, All Autumn Foliage and All Winter Foliage has collections of different types of plant with the same colour in that season from the 212 colours of foliage on the same page where that foliage is a different colour in more than 1 season. The same colours as in the All Foliage Gallery are used in these Galleries. This can produce the same, complementary or contrasting foliage colour in each season lists or juvenile growth season followed by mature season followed by dying to dead annual foliage season lists. Each Text Description below each of the Thumbnails in those Comparison Pages gives you the:-
    • soil type it prefers,
    • plant name,
    • sun aspect,
    • soil moisture in the background colour,
    • plant type,
    • months of flowering and
    • height of the plant in the border colour of that plant.
  • The Herbaceous Perennial Flower Shape Gallery sorts herbaceous perennial thumbnail pictures into:-
    • Number of Flower Petals,
    • Flower Simple Shape of a flower,
    • Flower Elaborated Shape of a flower,
    • Flower Elaborated Shape of a composite of flowers and
    • Flower Natural Arrangement Pages
      using the system from The Daily Telegraph Best Flowers to Grow and Cut by David Joyce (ISBN 0 7112 2366 1), which groups plants according to defined characteristics of flower simple shape, elaborated shape, flower details and flower textures.
  • The Rock Plant Flowers has plants suitable for a small rock garden with the same colour from 1 of the 53 colours of flower petal on the same page. The same colours as in the Flower Colour Wheel are used here. Each of the hundreds of Text Descriptions in the Index Pages gives you the:-
    • soil mixture it prefers,
    • plant name,
    • sun aspect position and protection,
    • soil moisture,
    • plant type,
    • flower colour and months of flowering,
    • height and width of the plant and
    • propagation details.
  • I have taken photos of 22 Rock Garden Plants suitable for a small rock garden from the Alpine House in RHS garden at Wisley during 2013, which may not be described in the Rock Plant Flowers Gallery. Each of these plants has their own page in Rock Plant Photos Gallery and will include other plants as I take their photos in 2014.

 

Note that EVERY page in this website is a Table, which can be copied to a Word-processing package and its rows or columns re-ordered or sorted to your personal requirements on your computer for your own use not commercial use.

.

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

Ivydene
Horticultural
Services

If you know the name of the plant you wish to see, you can ask Google and get information; otherwise for the public this website may help you choose your plants using foliage, shape and seed/fruit as well as flower photos before you buy them mailorder directly from the nursery / seed company that has not donated the use of their photos!

With free advertising of their plants, I am asking for photos from the public / nurseries / seed companies / suppliers in the UK from August 2009 to July 2015, or any other country in the European Union, who would supply plants / seeds mailorder direct to the public in the UK and/or the rest of the world. This also applies to American nurseries for America, Chinese Nurseries for China, etc since the plants from most other countries in the world can also be grown in the UK as well as their own country; providing the appropriate growing conditions are stated.

 

 

Site design and content copyright ©August 2009. Menus amended July 2015. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the breakage of the link to the Safety Regulations for man walking with Red Flag before Automobile.  

Each Plant in 1 of 52+Black, 2 Gray and 2 White Flower Petal Colour Wheel Pages
Dark Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Red 12 is Blood Red
Dark Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Red Orange 12 is Chocolate
Dark Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Orange 1 is Rusty Pelican
Dark Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Yellow Orange 1 is Browser Caramel
Dark Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Yellow 12 is Grass Stain
Dark Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Yellow Green 12 is Verdun Green
Dark Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Green 12 is Pakistan Green
Dark Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Blue 12 is Navy Blue
Dark Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Blue Violet 12 is Violet
Dark Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Violet 12 is Royal Purple
Dark Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Red Violet 12 is Dried Blood
Mid-Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Red 34 is Fuzzy Wuzzy
Mid-Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Red Orange 34 is Heatland
Mid-Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Yellow Orange 23 is Bhuddha Gold
Mid-Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Yellow Green 34 is Slimer 2
Mid-Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Green 34 is Weak Green
Mid-Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Blue 34 is Periwinkle
Mid-Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Blue Violet 34 is The Bands
Mid-Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Violet 34 is Calihoe
Mid-Tone Foliage Colour Plant Index: Red Violet 34 is Forbidden
Pure Hue Foliage Colour Plant Index: Red 56 is Red Page 1
Pure Hue Foliage Colour Plant Index: Red 56 is Red Page 2
Pure Hue Foliage Colour Plant Index: Red Orange 5 is Orange
Pure Hue Foliage Colour Plant Index: Orange 3 is Vitamin C
Pure Hue Foliage Colour Plant Index: Yellow Orange 45 is Tangerine
Pure Hue Foliage Colour Plant Index: Yellow 56 is Yellow Page 1
Pure Hue Foliage Colour Plant Index: Yellow 56 is Yellow Page 2
Pure Hue Foliage Colour Plant Index: Yellow Green 56 is Lovely Lime
Pure Hue Foliage Colour Plant Index: Green 56 is Lime
Pure Hue Foliage Colour Plant Index: Blue 56 is Blue
Pure Hue Foliage Colour Plant Index: Blue Violet 56 is Grape
Pure Hue Foliage Colour Plant Index: Violet 56 is Fuchsia or Magenta
Pure Hue Foliage Colour Plant Index: Red Violet 56 is Process Pagenta
Pastel Foliage Colour Plant Index: Red 789 is Flat Pink
Pastel Foliage Colour Plant Index: Red Orange 6 is Orangelin
Pastel Foliage Colour Plant Index: Orange 45 is Atomic Tangerine
Pastel Foliage Colour Plant Index: Yellow Orange 67 is Sand
Pastel Foliage Colour Plant Index: Yellow 78 is Bone Page 1
Pastel Foliage Colour Plant Index: Yellow 78 is Bone Page 2
Pastel Foliage Colour Plant Index: Yellow Green 78 is Limeade
Pastel Foliage Colour Plant Index: Green 789 is Offwhite Green
Pastel Foliage Colour Plant Index: Blue Green 78 is Baby Blue
Pastel Foliage Colour Plant Index: Blue 78 is Offwhite Blue
Pastel Foliage Colour Plant Index: Blue Violet 7 is Mauve
Pastel Foliage Colour Plant Index: Violet 89 is Magenta Shift
Pastel Foliage Colour Plant Index: Red Violet 78 is Pink Page 1
Pastel Foliage Colour Plant Index: Red Violet 78 is Pink Page 2
Neutral Foliage Colour Plant Index: Gray 234
Neutral Foliage Colour Plant Index: Gray 5
Neutral Foliage Colour Plant Index: Gray 5 Page 2 of 2
Neutral Foliage Colour Plant Index: Pure White 1 of Cultivated Foliage
Neutral Foliage Colour Plant Index: Pure White 2 of Cultivated Foliage
Neutral Foliage Colour Plant Index: Pure White 3 of Cultivated Foliage
Neutral Foliage Colour Plant Index: Pure White 6 of UK Wildflowers Page 1
Neutral Foliage Colour Plant Index: Pure White 6 of UK Wildflowers Page 2
Foliage Colour Plant Index: Multi-Coloured Page 1
Foliage Colour Plant Index: Variegated Yellow/Green Page 1
Foliage Colour Plant Index: Variegated White/Green Page 1
Foliage Colour Wheel Gallery Introduction
Site Map for Plants in Foliage Colour Wheel Pages

 

These are the Flower Colours for the UK Native Wildflowers:-

Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour
NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown Note
...Cream Note
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note

followed by some of the Other Flower Colour Wheels:-

 

2. Bulb Colour Wheel

7 Flower Colours per Month in Colour Wheel below in
BULB, CORM, RHIZOME and TUBER GALLERY.

Click on Black or White box in Colour of Month.

 

BULB, CORM, RHIZOME AND TUBER INDEX - There are over 700 bulbs in the bulb galleries. The respective flower thumbnail, months of flowering, height and width, foliage thumbnail, form thumbnail use and comments are in the relevant index page below:-
(o): A
(o): B
(o): C
(o): D
(o): E
(o): F
(o): G
(o): H
(o): I
....: J
....: K
(o): L
(o): M
(o): N
(o): O
(o): P
....: Q
....: R
(o): S
(o): T
....: U
(o): V
....: W
(o): XYZ

colormonthbulb9a1a1a1

 

 

3. Bee-pollinated plants in Colour Wheel of 12 Flower Colours Per Month

Besides the plants in the
British Floral Sources of importance to Honey Bees
and
Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers
the following 3 sets of Bee-pollinated plants are suitable for Hay-fever Sufferers; except for the 2 grasses :-

  • This Bee-pollinated Bloom in Month gallery compares 13 flower colour photos per month for many plants from the other Galleries, by clicking on the 1 in the relevant Flower per month Colour in the Colour Wheel down on the right,
  • the Bee-pollinated Index Gallery provides the tabular index of another 265 plants with the relevant colour in that respective month:-
    • 51 ANNUALS
    • 2 ANNUAL - VEGETABLE
    • 4 AQUATIC PLANTS
    • 11 BIENNIALS
    • 21 BULBS, CORMS, OR RHIZOMES
    • 4 CLIMBERS
    • 31 DECIDUOUS SHRUBS
    • 26 DECIDUOUS TREES
    • 10 EVERGREEN PERENNIALS
    • 22 EVERGREEN SHRUBS
    • 2 EVERGREEN TREES
    • 2 GRASSES which cause hayfever
    • 4 SEMI-EVERGREEN SHRUBS
    • 66 HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS
    • 9 PERENNIAL HERBS
      followed by
  • Click on these extra bee-pollinated plant names:-

bloomsmonth2a1a

Inner circle of Grey is 12 months of Unusual or Multi-Coloured Flower Colour

 

 

4. Rock Garden (Alpines) suitable for Small Gardens in 53 Colours (Peter Reason of boundarynursery.co.uk sells plants to use in a small raised alpine bed)

colourwheelexported1a1a1a

FLOWERING IN MONTH
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

 

 

5. Bloom in Month with 12 Flower Colours per Month

 

Click on a Page Number in a cell below containing your required Flower Petal Colour of a Month to
compare thumbnails of different flowers with that same flower colour in that month.

Click on capital letter of the Alphabet in a cell below to compare extra plants of that colour in that month.

 

Unusual Flower Petals are either
Multi-coloured, Bicolours,
Variegated,
Blends or a different colour to the others.

 

Month

Blue Flower Petals

Brown Flower Petals

Cream Flower Petals

Green Flower Petals

Mauve Flower Petals

Orange Flower Petals

Pink Flower Petals

Purple Flower Petals

Red Flower Petals

Unu-sual Flower Petals

White Flower Petals

Yellow Flower Petals

January

1

1 empty

1 empty
A

1 empty

1
A

1 empty

1

1

1

1

1
A

1
A

February

1

1 empty

1
A

1

1
A

1

1

1

1

1

1
A

1
A

March

1

1 empty

1
A

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
A

April

1
A

1

1

1

1

1

1
A

1

1

1

1 2
A

1
A

May

1
A

1
A

1

1

1

1

1
A

1

1

1

1 2
A

1
A

June

1

1
A

1

1

1

1

1 2 3

1

1 2

1 2 3 4 A

1 2 3

1 2 A

July

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 2 3 4

1

1 2 3

1 2 3 4 A

1 2 3

1 2 3 A

August

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 2 3 4

1

1 2 3

1 2 3 4 A

1 2 3

1 2

September

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 2 3

1

1

1 A

1

1

October

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 A

1 A

1

November

1

1

1

1 empty

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 A

1 A

December

1

1 empty

1
A

1 empty

1

1 empty

1

1

1

1

1 A

1 A

 

 

6. Climbers Bloom per Month with 7 Flower Colours per Month

colormonthclimber9a1a1a1a1

 

 

7. Evergreen Perennials Bloom per Month with 7 Flower Colours per Month

colormonthbulb9a1a

 

colormonthbulb9a1a1

 

8. Herbaceous Perennials Bloom per Month with 7 Flower Colours per Month

 

7 Flower Colours - Blue, White, Yellow, Green for Unusual Colour with Red, Pink and Purple on same page - per Month in Colour Wheel below in the HERBACEOUS PERENNIAL Gallery.

Click on Black or White box in Colour of Month.

colormonth9bpub1a1a

 

9. Herbaceous Perennials Bloom per Month with 7 Flower Colours per Month for the Herbaceous Perennials at RHS Wisley described in the MIXED BORDER DESIGN Topic.

 

7 Flower Colours - Blue, White, Yellow, Green for Unusual, Red, Orange and Pink per Month in Colour Wheel below in the MIXED BORDER DESIGN Topic.

Click on Black or White box in Colour of Month.

 

 

Plant Care

This is a photo of a Ryegrass plant, that was growing in Type I MOT Roadstone on flat ground in a private garden. You will note that it has a great deal of fibrous root - apparently in American Baseball Stadiums each grass plant has over 100 miles of root.

grassroot2a

.

That root in cooperation with worms, bacteria etc takes in food, which is brought down from the surface by water (usually rain, but can be by irrigation) either in tunnels created by the worms, moles, etc or when the ground cracks open in the summer when the clay soil dries up and shrinks - clay soil can absorb 40% of its own volume before it turns from a solid to a liquid. That root also breathes in oxygen then expels carbon dioxide (Click on Carbon Cycle) and nitrogen (Click on Nitrogen Cycle) ALL THE TIME.

If you buy Sharp-Washed-Sand from a Builder's Merchant and put that into a clean pot round a plant, then using NPK fertilisers the roots of that plant can absorb that food dissolved in water. Once you stop supplying that water and food, that plant will die (it is like saying that for you to survive, that you need a lb of glucose each day, so I sit you down outside and put 365 lbs of glucose round your feet. It rains and within 6 weeks that glucose has either been eaten by you or dissolved in the rain and washed down into the ground below your feet. Then you complain to me that you are hungry).

To make that Sharp-Washed-Sand into soil, you need dead plant material, shit from animals or dead animals, bacteria, worms that can be eaten by the animal, bacteria and worms to bind those sand particles together with clay and organic matter (Click on Soil Structure). That soil can then hold onto the some of the rain (Click on How does Water act in the Soil) with food for the animal/plant in it, before the excess rain drains through below the top soil to the sub-soil and the food in it is then lost to the plants above it. The easiest method of supplying the dead plant material is to collect your potato peelings, tea bags, coffee grounds in a bucket under the sink before putting them on the ground surface round a plant. Then, mow the lawn and put 1cm or 0.5 inch depth of grass mowings on top to complete the organic mulch, provide water from the grass and nitrogen from it to compost the peelings below. The worms having made tunnels in the soil may also eat the peelings. When it rains the water can absorb nutrients from that mulch and take it down using those tunnels. WHEN THOSE TUNNELS ARE FULL OF WATER AND A CLOD-HOPPING HUMAN WALKS ON IT, THEN IT COLLAPSES AND NO LONGER FUNCTIONS. If it rains heavily, allow the ground to recover for a couple of days before walking on it.

You can then see that a Sandy Soil is much easier for the roots of a plant to get into, but when it rains it dries up quickly and then the food in it gets washed through it very quickly (Click on How are Chemicals stored and released from Soil?). It is also easier for the gases to get in and out.

A clay soil is more difficult for plants, since when it rains the tunnels fill up with water and thus could drown the roots. Put sand round its roots up to the surface of the soil and this will combine with the clay to stop the roots from being drowned or without Nitrogen and Carbon gas exchange. If your lawn is soggy when it rains, then cut the lawn short when it is dry and apply 25Kg of sand over a 5 metre x 5 metre area once a month for 3 months during May-September and it will change the soil structure to lessen that.

A mixture of Clay and Soil is best (Click on Soil Formation - What is Soil Texture?).

 

I saw a yew tree that had been planted in a churchyard in 2000 as a 2 foot high tree. In 2009 it had reached 7 feet high and 3 feet across. Why had it not grown?

It was planted on a 30 degree slope in clay/sand soil with grass growing round its base. It had the following 3 reasons for failure to grow:-

  • When it rained, the water would either be taken up by the roots of the grass (Click on the roots of just 1 plant in the photo above) or run off down the slope.
  • The grass would take all the nutrients out the top soil leaving none to be washed down to the roots of the yew tree.
  • The grass would be using all the oxygen that came down the tunnels, leaving none for the yew tree

So, I carefully removed the grass and its roots from around its base out to the tips of the tree branches and mulched that bare ground with shrub prunings / grass mowings to a 4 inch depth. A year later it was growing quite well with new leaves and an increase of density of branches.

In Maderia I saw a mature olive tree - which had been transplanted from the nursery to a roof garden - a year after it was planted. It was on a mound with brazilian grass growing round its base. It was dying from dehydration even though it was irrigated every other day - the grass was growing well.

An organic mulch about 4 inches deep on weeded soil makes garden maintenance very easy. Once a week you walk round the garden and using a swoe (a hoe has 2 arms to the horizontal blade, a swoe only has 1 so that you can stand on the lawn and be able to hoe behind the plant in front of you) hoe through the weed root in the top of the mulch and remove the uprooted weed. I find that Spent Mushroom Compost is light, easy to lay, easy to hoe and lasts a relatively long time. You may lose about 50% each year. If you do not apply any mulch and you do have groundcover plants covering all the soil, then you will enjoy permanent weeding chores like the painters on the Forth Bridge last century - you come to the other side and have to start again immediately. When you prune your shrubs/trees/hedges then put the prunings on your uncut lawn. When you deadhead your bulbs or remove perennials, shake off the earth from the roots and place on the uncut lawn. Using a rotary mower cut your lawn and it will cut the grass and your prunings/perennials into small bits which you then mulch your flower beds/hedges with. In the autumn, set your mower to its highest cut and transfer the autumn fallen leaves onto the lawn before mowing them and mulching as before. Continue mowing once a week untill all fallen leaves have been removed.

If your garden is on a steep slope - I maintained one that had half-circle beds with lawn paths round them - the diameter of the circle was usually level and the half-circumference went down the slope. The ground had flint and chalk in it and the plants in it were usually the inverted cone shape. When it rained, the stones would be washed off onto the lawn paths and damage my mowing machine. Providing any mulch applied to those beds is covered with grass mowings, then that problem - of the stones being washed off by any rain however hard onto the paths - is stopped.

Roots of plants that you put into your garden do extend and grow, but the existing roots do not move by themselves to better places. You have to untangle them and spread them out yourself. I planted a blue cedar in my front garden and 9 years later it died. When I took it out, I found that the roots which had been going round the inside of the pot before I planted it had expanded sideways to fill the complete space between them as if they were still in the pot. There were very few roots which had grown away from this rootball and so the plant died due to dehydration, lack of food and lack of gas exchange in the ground.

A minor point that people forget is that you only live because you can breath oxygen, and plants provide it. So please look after the plant so that they have food, water and air (best soil has at least 30% air in it) on a regular basis, just like you do for your children.

.

The following photos show that nature can create conditions in and on a bed of Type I Roadstone - laid on a geotextile to prevent the soil under it from mixing with it - to support plants and then grow grass.

This is the same garden as the one showing the roots of a Ryegrass plant above. The Roadstone had been laid to create a more level garden and then only used with a normal washing line to dry washing. The weeds were growing quite tall in the area where the dead leaves from the Leylandii Hedge growing alongside the boundary fence in the next door garden were depositing themselves.

In order to reduce the length of time maintaining this garden, reduce the height of growing vegetation and since some grass had already started to grow, it was decided to sow grass seed and then let nature take its course without an irrigation system.

roadstonegrass1

So the first area was cleared, cheap grass seed sown and some sand was scattered over the seed to level the surface, prevent the birds from eating the seed and produce an easier area for the grass roots.

roadstonegrass2

The juvenile grass appeared after a couple of weeks.

The weeds grow in the roadstone covering this garden and have been used as a mulch on the raised bed on the left. A self-sown seedling of an oak tree has been growing in this raised bed and its only maintenance consists of providing a mulch of the weeds removed from this garden round its base. Since this minimal maintenance program was started, the sapling has grown 4 feet in 2 years.

The paver in the middle covers the hole for the supporting tube of the washing line.

roadstonegrass4

These show the new grass growing in the roadstone with sand on top and in the roadstone without sand on the top.

 

So, if you want a new drive that will provide you with:-

  • oxygen for you to breathe,
  • absorb the rainfall that falls on it rather than that rain going into the public road and maybe causing flooding further down the road,
  • solve the problem of overhanging trees dropping their leaves on your ground - in the autumn set your mower to its highest setting and once a fortnight mow the drive, then use the mown grass/leaves as a mulch on your flower beds, vegetable beds and hedges,
  • re-use an area that was boggy or unused for a hardstanding for cars, caravans or boats.

then remember to use a geotextile under 4 inch depth (10cms) for sand or chalk soil or 8 inch depth for clay soil (Click on Case 3 which details the foundation depth required) to prevent the soil and stone mixing and the roots of trees or shrubs from growing in it. Then, sow your grass seed before blinding it with a thin layer of sharp-washed sand to level it and stop the birds from eating that seed. Then, from March to December mow it after each 3 week period to 1 inch (2.5cms) height to keep it low.

roadstonegrass3a

 

According to the Civil Service Motoring Association Magazine of September 2012, "there are 7,000,000 UK gardens that have been paved over to make space for parking, says the RAC Foundation. The increase in vehicle numbers, and limit on public parking spaces, means that, of the 80 per cent of dwellings built with a front garden, two-thirds are now paved over for cars." Most of the current population in the UK breathe, and that means that most of the current population do not have the 25 x 25 feet of lawn necessary for that lawn to produce their required Oxygen for the year for them to breathe as well as the incredible amount of oxygen used by car engines. This means that the human population is currently asphyxiating itself, instead of growing grass to park their cars on.

 

Site Map for Foliage Colour being nearest to Colour in this Colour Wheel Page

Introduction explains the 54 links to the 54 colour pages in the Colour Wheel links map below

 

There are other pages on Plants which bloom in each month of the year in this website:-

 

THE 2 EUREKA EFFECT PAGES FOR UNDERSTANDING SOIL AND HOW PLANTS INTERACT WITH IT OUT OF 15,000:-


Explanation of Structure of this Website with User Guidelines Page for those photo galleries with Photos (of either ones I have taken myself or others which have been loaned only for use on this website from external sources)

 

or

 

when I do not have my own or ones from mail-order nursery photos , then from March 2016, if you want to start from the uppermost design levels through to your choice of cultivated and wildflower plants to change your Plant Selection Process then use the following galleries:-

  • Create and input all plants known by Amateur Gardening inserted into their Sanders' Encyclopaedia from their edition published in 1960 (originally published by them in 1895) into these
    • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery,
      then
    • Stage 2 - Infill Plants Index Gallery being the only gallery from these 7 with photos (from Wikimedia Commons) ,
      then
    • Stage 3 - All Plants Index Gallery with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2
    • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery,
    • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery with
    • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery and
    • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery
    • Unfortunately, if you want to have 100's of choices on selection of plants from 1000's of 1200 pixels wide by up to 16,300 pixels in length webpages, which you can jump to from almost any of the pages in these 7 galleries above, you have to put up with those links to those choices being on
      • the left topic menu table,
      • the header of the middle data table and on
      • the page/index menu table on the right of every page of those galleries.

 

 

I hope that you find that the information in this website is useful to you:-

I like reading and that is shown by the index in my Library, where I provide lists of books to take you between designing, maintaining or building a garden and the hierarchy of books on plants taking you from

There are these systems for choosing plants as shown in

  • Plants topic
  • Garden Style Index Gallery
  • Colour Wheel of All Flowers 53 flower colours
  • Colour Wheel of All Flowers per Month 53 flower colours
  • Flower Shape
  • This All Bee-Pollinated Flowers gallery compares 13 flower colour photos per month for many plants from the other Galleries, by clicking on the 1 in the relevant Flower per month Colour in the Colour Wheel down on the right,
  • the Bee-pollinated Index Gallery provides the tabular index of another 264 plants with the relevant colour in that respective month:-
    • 51 ANNUALS
    • 2 ANNUAL - VEGETABLE
    • 4 AQUATIC PLANTS
    • 11 BIENNIALS
    • 21 BULBS, CORMS, OR RHIZOMES
    • 4 CLIMBERS
    • 31 DECIDUOUS SHRUBS
    • 26 DECIDUOUS TREES
    • 9 EVERGREEN PERENNIALS
    • 22 EVERGREEN SHRUBS
    • 2 EVERGREEN TREES
    • 2 GRASSES which cause hayfever
    • 4 SEMI-EVERGREEN SHRUBS
    • 66 HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS
    • 9 PERENNIAL HERBS

82 rock garden plants (with photos) suitable for small garden areas; split into:-

2 ALLIUM and ANEMONE Bulbs
3 BULBS - Spring Catalogue. For planting in February/ May
2 BULBS - Late Summer Catalogue. For planting in July/ September
7 BULBS - Autumn Catalogue. For planting in September/ November
2 Bulbs - Winter Catalogue. For planting in November/ March
35 COLCHICUM AND CROCUS BULBS.
0 DECIDUOUS SHRUBS
30 EVERGREEN PERENNIALS
1 EVERGREEN SHRUBS
0 HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS
0 ROSES
in the Rock Plant Flowers Gallery.
All the remaining rock garden plants detailed in the Rock Garden Plant Index pages in the Rock Plant Flowers are waiting to receive photos, before they can be added to the 1 of the 52 Rockgarden Colour Wheel - Flowers Pages and then the above list.

I am taking photos of rock garden plants suitable for small gardens and if they do not have their own Plant Description Page in this website, then each photo of each plant will be located at the bottom of the relevant 1 of 52 Rockgarden Flower Colour Wheel pages. Usually a link in *** to that page of 35 will be included in the Name field of the respective Index Page, for:-

15 BULBS, CORMS and TUBERS
4 EVERGREEN SUBSHRUBS
7 EVERGREEN PERENNIALS
2 EVERGREEN SHRUBS
7 HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS
Then a link using More Photos Page links to the Rock Plant Photos Gallery for each of the above 35 Rock Garden Plants


Book - A Gardener's Latin The Language of Plants Explained by Richard Bird ISBN 978-I-91023-205-7 (published 2015) has chapters on :-

  • Prefixes
  • Suffixes
  • Colour
    black and white
    red and pink
    blue, violet and orange
    yellow and orange
    green and brown
  • Shape
    flower shape
    leaf shape
    plant shape
  • Fragrance and taste
  • Flowering time
     

 

MyGardenInsider is a website dedicated to providing gardeners with information and inspiration on the activity of gardening.

We are a division of MasterTag, a third generation family business in Montague, Michigan and proud to be the originator as well as the leading provider of the horticulture plant tags you have come to rely upon for accurate care information.

Our horticultural heritage is what makes MyGardenInsider unique among gardening websites. Our staff of experienced horticulturists, industry professionals and real world gardening knowledge will bring an 'insider's' perspective to gardeners of all levels of experience and interest. Through our longstanding relationships with breeders, growers and garden retailers, we offer the most current and advanced preview of gardening trends, information and ideas.

This row has absolutely nothing to do with gardening:

We get some of our veg from Riverford Organic Farmers and the following statements are what they included in their delivery on 31 July 2017:-

"History tells us that no organisation is capable of reliable self-regulation, whether a newspaper, government, the police, the Catholic Church and certainly not a supermarket.

Riverford is currently moving towards employee ownership (EO), with staff due to take a 74% stake in May 2018. This has led to a lot of navel-gazing about what values Riverford stands for, and how we will protect them into the future. We have visited other values-driven and EO companies, studied their governance structures and researched what works and what doesn't. Through this I have almost managed to grow out of my knee-jerk antagonism to the idea of someone else auditing my virtue.

Power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely; the idea of being your own judge, jury and executioner becomes progressively more dangerous as an organisation grows. I accept that we have reached a stage where we must agree a more objective measurement of how we behave towards staff, customers and supplier and need impartial means of checking how we are doing (through the creation of an external EO Trust and our Customer Roundtable)."

Since the majority of the Wildflowers detailed in this website are available in either seed or plug-plant form, why do you not mix them with the cultivated plants in your garden?

There are 2157 (
1481 cultivated plants with
46 cultivated plants from RHS Wisley - from
Mixed Border Herbaceous, Mixed Border Design and RHS Roses - and
628 wildflower plants from Wild Flower ) plant forms split into:-

  • 165 WILDFLOWER - ANNUALS / BIENNIALS (including Aquatic plants, which grow in water or wet soil)
  • 8 WILDFLOWER - CLIMBERS
  • 5 WILDFLOWER - GRASSES / RUSHES / SEDGES
  • 60 WILDFLOWER - UNDER-SHRUB / SHRUBS / TREES
  • 365 WILDFLOWER - PERENNIALS (including Aquatic Perennials)
  • 17 WILDFLOWER - PARASITES
  • 8 WILDFLOWER - RHIZOMES / BULBS
  • 10 BEDDING
  • 97 ALLIUM AND ANEMONE BULBS.
  • 5 BULBS - Spring Catalogue.
  • 89 BULBS - Late Summer Catalogue.
  • 42 BULBS - Autumn Catalogue.
  • 3 BULBS - Winter Catalogue.
  • 105 CLIMBERS
  • 115 COLCHICUM AND CROCUS BULBS.
  • 46 DAHLIA TUBERS
  • 29 DECIDUOUS SHRUBS
  • 90 EVERGREEN PERENNIALS
  • 45 EVERGREEN SHRUBS
  • 203 GLADIOLI CORMS
  • 57 HEATHER EVERGREEN SHRUBS
  • 132 HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS
  • 62 LILIUM BULBS
  • 54 NARCISSUS BULBS
  • 343 ROSES
  • 1 SEMI-EVERGREEN PERENNIAL

in this Gallery.

 

All Foliage 53 Gallery now uses the 53 colours in the Colour Wheel 1 below. This is a duplication of the colour wheel used in All Flowers 53 gallery. On 22 January 2021, this gallery contains the flowers of the cultivated and UK wildflower plants detailed in row 3 above. These will be moved to the correct foliage colour comparison page in this gallery with a foliage image instead of a flower image.

Colour Wheel 1
I have split the Colour Wheel in the second table into the following 48 colours plus the 4 Neutral colours (I have added the web-safe colour name to the Colour Wheel Name as detailed in colourcodes) as well as multicolours.


Colour Wheel 2
212 FOLIAGE COLOUR COMPARISON PAGES of the redundant All Foliage 212 Gallery :-
The colour palette in All Foliage 212 Gallery is the colour palette of the Mac OS X system color palette. They are the web-safe colours that should display accurately on most colour monitors.
I found websites which voted on what name to call each colour and have used those names with a link to the website that named each colour in 2011.
If the colour name is typed in black; then I have named it.
"The industry standard in horticulture for years has been the Royal Horticultural Society's or RHS Colour Chart. Unfortunately it does not have enough colors for many genera
and when it can be found in the larger, famous green-boxed edition it's usually US $150-275. At the New Ornamentals Society we use the Pantone Goe System with 2058
different colors and that can be had online (especially ebay) for $70-110. Today we find more than 200 US Plant Patents using the Pantone Goe system instead of the RHS because of it's greater range of colors and portability as one large fan. Five minutes with the Pantone Goe fan in a diverse garden (we sampled the 6000 taxa at the Raulston Arboretum and the 11,000 at Juniper Level Botanic Garden of Plant Delights Nursery) and one realizes why this color system is the international standard among
graphic artists, designers, manufacturing planners, architects, marketing consultants, printers, and pretty much every other industry on earth." from the International Coleus Society.
Unfortunately it would take 10 galleries to hold that number of colours and continuation pages; and so I will stick to the web-safe colours in All Foliage 212 Gallery.

Colour Wheel 3
Previous version of the RHS Colour Chart had colours that could not be shown using an 8 bit RGB code for each of the 3 colours and it might appear that the new one also has the
same problem. So how do nurseries or others communicate these colours if you cannot see them on a screen? except by stating the name given it by the RHS and expecting everyone to pay more than £200 to be able to visualize the colour? In response to my email, I received the following reply from the Royal Horticultural Society on the 22 June 2020:-
Good Afternoon,
Thank you for your email – the RHS colour chart is designed for comparing the colours of plants, as it is based on natural colours it does not contain RGB information like a pantone chart.
Kindest Regards
Jack Hendy
Mail Order & Ecommerce Co-ordinator
 Tel: 01483 212357
Royal Horticultural Society
RHS Enterprises Ltd
RHS Garden Wisley
Woking GU23 6QB
RHS Enterprises Ltd, Registered Office 80 Vincent Square, London SW1P 2PE.
Registered in England and Wales, Reg. No: 1211648.  VAT Reg No: 461 532757
From: chris@ivydenegardens.co.uk <chris@ivydenegardens.co.uk> 
Sent: 14 June 2020 20:34
To: MailOrder <MailOrder@rhs.org.uk>
Subject: rhsshop.co.uk enquiry
Dear Sir/Madam,
Does RHS Large Colour Chart (Sixth Revised Edition)
Have the 8 bit RGB code for each of the 3 colours making up each colour together with its name?
Regards
Chris Garnons-Williams
The Royal Horticultural Society is the UK’s leading gardening charity. We aim to enrich everyone’s life through plants, and make the UK a greener and more beautiful place. This vision, expressed through our Greening Great Britain campaign, underpins all that we do – from inspirational gardens and shows, through our scientific research, to our education and community programmes. We are committed to inspiring everyone to grow.

 

 

 

There are these systems for choosing plants as shown in

  • Plants topic
  • Garden Style Index Gallery
  • Colour Wheel of All Flowers 53 flower colours
  • Colour Wheel of All Flowers per Month 12 flower colours
  • Flower Shape
  • This All Bee-Pollinated Flowers gallery compares 12 flower colour photos per month for many plants from the other Galleries, by clicking on the 1 in the relevant Flower per month Colour in the Colour Wheel down on the right,
  • the Bee-pollinated Index Gallery provides the tabular index of another 264 plants with the relevant colour in that respective month:-
    • 51 ANNUALS
    • 2 ANNUAL - VEGETABLE
    • 4 AQUATIC PLANTS
    • 11 BIENNIALS
    • 21 BULBS, CORMS, OR RHIZOMES
    • 4 CLIMBERS
    • 31 DECIDUOUS SHRUBS
    • 26 DECIDUOUS TREES
    • 9 EVERGREEN PERENNIALS
    • 22 EVERGREEN SHRUBS
    • 2 EVERGREEN TREES
    • 2 GRASSES which cause hayfever
    • 4 SEMI-EVERGREEN SHRUBS
    • 66 HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS
    • 9 PERENNIAL HERBS

82 rock garden plants (with photos) suitable for small garden areas; split into:-

2 ALLIUM and ANEMONE Bulbs
3 BULBS - Spring Catalogue. For planting in February/ May
2 BULBS - Late Summer Catalogue. For planting in July/ September
7 BULBS - Autumn Catalogue. For planting in September/ November
2 Bulbs - Winter Catalogue. For planting in November/ March
35 COLCHICUM AND CROCUS BULBS.
0 DECIDUOUS SHRUBS
30 EVERGREEN PERENNIALS
1 EVERGREEN SHRUBS
0 HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS
0 ROSES
in the Rock Plant Flowers Gallery.
All the remaining rock garden plants detailed in the Rock Garden Plant Index pages in the Rock Plant Flowers are waiting to receive photos, before they can be added to the 1 of the 52 Rockgarden Colour Wheel - Flowers Pages and then the above list.

I am taking photos of rock garden plants suitable for small gardens and if they do not have their own Plant Description Page in this website, then each photo of each plant will be located at the bottom of the relevant 1 of 52 Rockgarden Flower Colour Wheel pages. Usually a link in *** to that page of 35 will be included in the Name field of the respective Index Page, for:-

15 BULBS, CORMS and TUBERS
4 EVERGREEN SUBSHRUBS
7 EVERGREEN PERENNIALS
2 EVERGREEN SHRUBS
7 HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS
Then a link using More Photos Page links to the Rock Plant Photos Gallery for each of the above 35 Rock Garden Plants

 

Oxygen to breathe?
According to the Civil Service Motoring Association Magazine of September 2012, "there are 7,000,000 UK gardens that have been paved over to make space for parking, says the RAC Foundation. The increase in vehicle numbers, and limit on public parking spaces, means that, of the 80 per cent of dwellings built with a front garden, two-thirds are now paved over for cars." Most of the current population in the UK breathe, and that means that most of the current population do not have the 25 x 25 feet of lawn necessary for that lawn to produce their required Oxygen for the year for them to breathe as well as the incredible amount of oxygen used by car engines. This means that the human population is currently asphyxiating itself, instead of growing grass to park their cars on.

 

Rainwater Drainage? in
Case 3 - Drive Foundations in Clay.
Are you aware of the legislation that came into force on 1st October 2008 which affects the drainage of front drives? www.communities.gov.uk/ publications/planningandbuilding/ pavingfrontgardens gives government advice on driveway planning which you may find useful. Apparently; after talking to a contractor in March 2018, the contractor and the householder will be fined £2000 each if that driveway does allow rainwater onto a public area. If you understand his attempt to provide a soakaway, then he creates a 1 cubic metre soakaway irrespective of what the soil is underneath the drive. You have to allow for a 2 inch (5 cm) depth of rain over the drive, so that 1 cubic metre soakaway will only allow for 20 square metres. When I have seen new driveways, which slope downwards to the pavement, I have seen a drain on the bottom edge before the pavement, but I have not noticed a soakaway. A drain may only contain a few litres and then the rest will go onto the pavement and the road. Hopefully the others which slope down towards the house do not have their drains going into the main drain from the house or the public storm sewer.
Front drives larger than 5 square metres are no longer allowed to discharge water onto the public road or into the domestic drainage without planning permission.
If you don't want to apply for planning permission at a cost of £150, the drive must be constructed of porous paving or a system such as channel and drain used to catch all surface flow and discharge it to a soak away (See Video from Marshalls on How to Install Driveways - Block Paving Installation) or other SUDS compliant facility on your own site. Point to note on Video from Marshalls, where they constructed a soakaway on site:-
If the ground is clay, then that soakaway will fill and never empty - that is why village ponds had clay holding the water in. In that case create that soakaway as a continuous one about 2 feet away from the boundary with it starting 3 feet from house and continuing round to meet the entrance of the drive, before planting privet or yew evergreen hedge in that 2 feet gap between it and the boundary to absorb the water from that driveway. The 2 feet depth of existing clay soil between that extended soakaway and the boundary should be replaced by the following mixture of 1 part existing soil and 1 part sand to provide a soil where the soakaway water can move from the soakaway through the soil to the hedge roots. The french drain used to transport the water should be surrounded by 4 inches of coarse pea-shingle inside an envelope of geotextile to stop that pea-shingle from mixing with the mixed soil.
Housebuilders keep on building houses on clay and perhaps it would be best for the buyer if the builder followed my recommendation for a changed soil for all the garden area round the new house as detailed in the table on the right. That would hopefully stop rainwater from exiting the property, and stop the house from subsiding after a long period of rain followed by a long period of dry sunny weather. Once a house has been transferred from a builder to a houseowner, then it is tough luck that due to that builder, then the new owner will be landed with a large portion of a subsidence bill. The 10 year Building Warranty Policy covers the full cost immediately the house is sold and that value was reduced by 10% a year. After 5 years, it only used to cover 50% of the cost, so the new owner could be landed with thousands of pounds cost in getting the house underpinned, followed by all the costs involved in redecorating, etc. My advice is not to buy a house built on clay, even if the foundations are more than 5 feet (60 inches, 150cms) deep. Even if the entire plot is horizontal, the water on clay must go somewhere - if it goes off your property then you could be fined, then if not you could end up with a lake, which could be redesignated as a swimming pool and your rates would go up followed by flooding of your downstairs rooms. If the plot is on a slope, then either the back or the front or one of the sides would collect water and this would cause more problems - because you have to find something to use up that water, if you did not want to use evergreen plants to do it with. The number of plants required might be more than could be fitted into your entire garden area.
If you construct any paving that directs the rainwater off your site, then this could delay or even stop a house sale - see Interpave for the latest information.
Why am I harping on about drainage on drives - the rainwater you allow onto the road will either go into a stormdrain or go to the bottom of the hill and could flood your neighbours down there, or the road down there. The stormdrain is designed for use by the public areas like pavements and roads, and not for the rainwater from your property as well. Nor is the Main Drain from your house designed for that rainwater either. Only the roof drains may connect to the public storm sewer.
CEDAdrive® provides an excellent low maintenance SUDS compliant surface suitable for paths, drives, car parks, caravan sites and lorry parks.
CEDAdrive® has been through extensive research and development to bring you the very best gravel stabilisation system on the market. The large sheets of 2.15m x 1.14m x 40mm are fitted with a geotextile underside and has been tested to 300 tonne when filled, which makes CEDAdrive® extremely tough and very quick and easy to install.

 

Solution to
rainwater drainage off your property and Oxygen to breathe problems

I have used this CEDAdrive® product for paths, driveways and patios.
My brother has used it on his front drive.
In order to provide a patio without losing a section of lawn, I have laid Plantex with CEDAdrive on top, filled it with loose earth, watered it, spread grass seed, filled again with earth and watered it. It then became a lawn that outside chairs and tables could be laid on without deforming this new lawn. This could be done for the drive as well instead of pea-shingle.

Topic
Plants detailed in this website by
Botanical Name

A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, Q, R, S, T, U,
V, W, X, Y, Z ,
Bulb
A1
, 2, 3, B, C1, 2,
D, E, F, G, Glad,
H, I, J, K, L1, 2,
M, N, O, P, Q, R,
S, T, U, V, W, XYZ ,
Evergreen Perennial
A
, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, Q, R, S, T, U,
V, W, X, Y, Z ,
Herbaceous Perennial
A1
, 2, B, C, D, E, F,
G, H, I, J, K, L, M,
N, O, P1, 2, Q, R,
S, T, U, V, W, XYZ,
Diascia Photo Album,
UK Peony Index

Wildflower
Botanical Names,
Common Names ,

will be
compared in:- Flower colour/month
Evergreen Perennial
,
F
lower shape Wildflower Flower Shape and
Plant use
Evergreen Perennial Flower Shape,
Bee plants for hay-fever sufferers

Bee-Pollinated Index
Butterfly
Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis, Butterfly Usage
of Plants.
Chalk
A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, QR, S, T, UV,
WXYZ
Companion Planting
A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, Q, R , S, T,
U ,V, W, X, Y, Z,
Pest Control using Plants
Fern Fern
1000 Ground Cover A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, Q, R, S, T, U,
V, W, XYZ ,
Rock Garden and Alpine Flowers
A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M,
NO, PQ, R, S, T,
UVWXYZ

Rose Rose Use

These 5 have Page links in rows below
Bulbs from the Infill Galleries (next row), Camera Photos,
Plant Colour Wheel Uses,
Sense of Fragrance, Wild Flower


Case Studies
...Drive Foundations
Ryegrass and turf kills plants within Roadstone and in Topsoil due to it starving and dehydrating them.
CEDAdrive creates stable drive surface and drains rain into your ground, rather than onto the public road.
8 problems caused by building house on clay or with house-wall attached to clay.
Pre-building work on polluted soil.

Companion Planting
to provide a Companion Plant to aid your selected plant or deter its pests

Garden
Construction

with ground drains

Garden Design
...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed
Borders

......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
......Camera photos of Plant supports
Garden
Maintenance

Glossary with a tomato teaching cauliflowers
Home
Library of over 1000 books
Offbeat Glossary with DuLally Bird in its flower clock.

Plants
...in Chalk
(Alkaline) Soil
......A-F1, A-F2,
......A-F3, G-L, M-R,
......M-R Roses, S-Z
...in Heavy
Clay Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...in Lime-Free
(Acid) Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...in Light
Sand Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z.
...Poisonous Plants.
...Extra Plant Pages
with its 6 Plant Selection Levels

Soil
...
Interaction between 2 Quartz Sand Grains to make soil
...
How roots of plants are in control in the soil
...
Without replacing Soil Nutrients, the soil will break up to only clay, sand or silt
...
Subsidence caused by water in Clay
...
Use water ring for trees/shrubs for first 2 years.

Tool Shed with 3 kneeling pads
Useful Data with benefits of Seaweed

Topic -
Plant Photo Galleries
If the plant type below has flowers, then the first gallery will include the flower thumbnail in each month of 1 of 6 colour comparison pages of each plant in its subsidiary galleries, as a low-level Plant Selection Process

Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape

Bulb
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus with its 40 Flower Colours
......European A-E
......European F-M
......European N-Z
......European Non-classified
......American A,
B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M,
N, O, P, Q, R, S,
T, U, V, W, XYZ
......American Non-classified
......Australia - empty
......India
......Lithuania
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
...Each of the above ...Bulb Galleries has its own set of Flower Colour Pages
...Flower Shape
...Bulb Form

...Bulb Use

...Bulb in Soil


Further details on bulbs from the Infill Galleries:-
Hardy Bulbs
...Aconitum
...Allium
...Alstroemeria
...Anemone

...Amaryllis
...Anthericum
...Antholyzas
...Apios
...Arisaema
...Arum
...Asphodeline

...Asphodelus
...Belamcanda
...Bloomeria
...Brodiaea
...Bulbocodium

...Calochorti
...Cyclobothrias
...Camassia
...Colchicum
...Convallaria 
...Forcing Lily of the Valley
...Corydalis
...Crinum
...Crosmia
...Montbretia
...Crocus

...Cyclamen
...Dicentra
...Dierama
...Eranthis
...Eremurus
...Erythrnium
...Eucomis

...Fritillaria
...Funkia
...Galanthus
...Galtonia
...Gladiolus
...Hemerocallis

...Hyacinth
...Hyacinths in Pots
...Scilla
...Puschkinia
...Chionodoxa
...Chionoscilla
...Muscari

...Iris
...Kniphofia
...Lapeyrousia
...Leucojum

...Lilium
...Lilium in Pots
...Malvastrum
...Merendera
...Milla
...Narcissus
...Narcissi in Pots

...Ornithogalum
...Oxalis
...Paeonia
...Ranunculus
...Romulea
...Sanguinaria
...Sternbergia
...Schizostylis
...Tecophilaea
...Trillium

...Tulip
...Zephyranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs
...Acidanthera
...Albuca
...Alstroemeri
...Andro-stephium
...Bassers
...Boussing-aultias
...Bravoas
...Cypellas
...Dahlias
...Galaxis,
...Geissorhizas
...Hesperanthas

...Gladioli
...Ixias
...Sparaxises
...Babianas
...Morphixias
...Tritonias

...Ixiolirions
...Moraeas
...Ornithogalums
...Oxalises
...Phaedra-nassas
...Pancratiums
...Tigridias
...Zephyranthes
...Cooperias

Uses of Bulbs:-
...for Bedding
...in Windowboxes
...in Border
...naturalized in Grass
...in Bulb Frame
...in Woodland Garden
...in Rock Garden
...in Bowls
...in Alpine House
...Bulbs in Green-house or Stove:-
...Achimenes
...Alocasias
...Amorpho-phalluses
...Arisaemas
...Arums
...Begonias
...Bomareas
...Caladiums

...Clivias
...Colocasias
...Crinums
...Cyclamens
...Cyrtanthuses
...Eucharises
...Urceocharis
...Eurycles

...Freesias
...Gloxinias
...Haemanthus
...Hippeastrums

...Lachenalias
...Nerines
...Lycorises
...Pencratiums
...Hymenocallises
...Richardias
...Sprekelias
...Tuberoses
...Vallotas
...Watsonias
...Zephyranthes

...Plant Bedding in
......Spring

......Summer
...Bulb houseplants flowering during:-
......January
......February
......March
......April
......May
......June
......July
......August
......September
......October
......November
......December
...Bulbs and other types of plant flowering during:-
......Dec-Jan
......Feb-Mar
......Apr-May
......Jun-Aug
......Sep-Oct
......Nov-Dec
...Selection of the smaller and choicer plants for the Smallest of Gardens with plant flowering during the same 6 periods as in the previous selection

Climber in
3 Sector Vertical Plant System
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evergreen
...Heather Shrub
...Heather Index
......Andromeda
......Bruckenthalia
......Calluna
......Daboecia
......Erica: Carnea
......Erica: Cinerea
......Erica: Others
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evergreen
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous
Perennial

...P -Herbaceous
...Peony
...Flower Shape
...RHS Wisley
......Mixed Border
......Other Borders
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron

Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use - page links in row 6. Rose, RHS Wisley and Other Roses rose indices on each Rose Use page
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Pruning Methods
Photo Index
R 1, 2, 3
Peter Beales Roses
RV Roger
Roses

Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable
Wild Flower and
Butterfly page links are in next row

Topic -
UK Butterfly:-
...Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly Usage
of Plants.
...Plant Usage by
Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly.

Both native wildflowers and cultivated plants, with these
...Flower Shape,
...
Uses in USA,
...
Uses in UK and
...
Flo Cols / month are used by Butter-flies native in UK


Wild Flower
with its wildflower flower colour page, space,
data page(s).
...Blue Site Map.
Scented Flower, Foliage, Root.
Story of their Common Names.
Use of Plant with Flowers.
Use for Non-Flowering Plants.
Edible Plant Parts.
Flower Legend.
Flowering plants of
Chalk and
Limestone 1
, 2.
Flowering plants of Acid Soil
1.
...Brown Botanical Names.
Food for
Butterfly/Moth.

...Cream Common Names.
Coastal and Dunes.
Sandy Shores and Dunes.
...Green Broad-leaved Woods.
...Mauve Grassland - Acid, Neutral, Chalk.
...Multi-Cols Heaths and Moors.
...Orange Hedge-rows and Verges.
...Pink A-G Lakes, Canals and Rivers.
...Pink H-Z Marshes, Fens, Bogs.
...Purple Old Buildings and Walls.
...Red Pinewoods.
...White A-D
Saltmarshes.
Shingle Beaches, Rocks and Cliff Tops.
...White E-P Other.
...White Q-Z Number of Petals.
...Yellow A-G
Pollinator.
...Yellow H-Z
Poisonous Parts.
...Shrub/Tree River Banks and other Freshwater Margins. and together with cultivated plants in
Colour Wheel.

You know its
name:-
a-h, i-p, q-z,
Botanical Names, or Common Names,
habitat:-
on
Acid Soil,
on
Calcareous
(Chalk) Soil
,
on
Marine Soil,
on
Neutral Soil,
is a
Fern,
is a
Grass,
is a
Rush,
is a
Sedge, or
is
Poisonous.

Each plant in each WILD FLOWER FAMILY PAGE will have a link to:-
1) its created Plant Description Page in its Common Name column, then external sites:-
2) to purchase the plant or seed in its Botanical Name column,
3) to see photos in its Flowering Months column and
4) to read habitat details in its Habitat Column.
Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
Arrow-Grass
Arum
Balsam
Bamboo
Barberry
Bedstraw
Beech
Bellflower
Bindweed
Birch
Birds-Nest
Birthwort
Bogbean
Bog Myrtle
Borage
Box
Broomrape
Buckthorn
Buddleia
Bur-reed
Buttercup
Butterwort
Cornel (Dogwood)
Crowberry
Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
Daffodil
Daisy
Daisy Cudweeds
Daisy Chamomiles
Daisy Thistle
Daisy Catsears Daisy Hawkweeds
Daisy Hawksbeards
Daphne
Diapensia
Dock Bistorts
Dock Sorrels
Clubmoss
Duckweed
Eel-Grass
Elm
Filmy Fern
Horsetail
Polypody
Quillwort
Royal Fern
Figwort - Mulleins
Figwort - Speedwells
Flax
Flowering-Rush
Frog-bit
Fumitory
Gentian
Geranium
Glassworts
Gooseberry
Goosefoot
Grass 1
Grass 2
Grass 3
Grass Soft
Bromes 1

Grass Soft
Bromes 2

Grass Soft
Bromes 3

Hazel
Heath
Hemp
Herb-Paris
Holly
Honeysuckle
Horned-Pondweed
Hornwort
Iris
Ivy
Jacobs Ladder
Lily
Lily Garlic
Lime
Lobelia
Loosestrife
Mallow
Maple
Mares-tail
Marsh Pennywort
Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
Mesem-bryanthemum
Mignonette
Milkwort
Mistletoe
Moschatel
Naiad
Nettle
Nightshade
Oleaster
Olive
Orchid 1
Orchid 2
Orchid 3
Orchid 4
Parnassus-Grass
Peaflower
Peaflower
Clover 1

Peaflower
Clover 2

Peaflower
Clover 3

Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
Pink 1
Pink 2
Pipewort
Pitcher-Plant
Plantain
Pondweed
Poppy
Primrose
Purslane
Rannock Rush
Reedmace
Rockrose
Rose 1
Rose 2
Rose 3
Rose 4
Rush
Rush Woodrushes
Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
Sandalwood
Saxifrage
Seaheath
Sea Lavender
Sedge Rush-like
Sedges Carex 1
Sedges Carex 2
Sedges Carex 3
Sedges Carex 4
Spindle-Tree
Spurge
Stonecrop
Sundew
Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
Teasel
Thyme 1
Thyme 2
Umbellifer 1
Umbellifer 2
Valerian
Verbena
Violet
Water Fern
Waterlily
Water Milfoil
Water Plantain
Water Starwort
Waterwort
Willow
Willow-Herb
Wintergreen
Wood-Sorrel
Yam
Yew


Topic -
The following is a complete hierarchical Plant Selection Process

dependent on the Garden Style chosen
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index


Topic -
Flower/Foliage Colour Wheel Galleries with number of colours as a high-level Plant Selection Process

All Flowers 53 with
...Use of Plant and
Flower Shape
- page links in bottom row

All Foliage 53
instead of redundant
...(All Foliage 212)


All Flowers
per Month 12


Bee instead of wind pollinated plants for hay-fever sufferers
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers
per Month
12
...Index

Rock Garden and Alpine Flowers
Rock Plant Flowers 53
INDEX
A, B, C, D, E, F,
G, H, I, J, K, L,
M, NO, PQ, R, S,
T, UVWXYZ
...Rock Plant Photos

Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours
per Month Index

...All Plants Index


Topic -
Use of Plant in your Plant Selection Process

Plant Colour Wheel Uses
with
1. Perfect general use soil is composed of 8.3% lime, 16.6% humus, 25% clay and 50% sand, and
2. Why you are continually losing the SOIL STRUCTURE so your soil - will revert to clay, chalk, sand or silt.
Uses of Plant and Flower Shape:-
...Foliage Only
...Other than Green Foliage
...Trees in Lawn
...Trees in Small Gardens
...Wildflower Garden
...Attract Bird
...Attract Butterfly
1
, 2
...Climber on House Wall
...Climber not on House Wall
...Climber in Tree
...Rabbit-Resistant
...Woodland
...Pollution Barrier
...Part Shade
...Full Shade
...Single Flower provides Pollen for Bees
1
, 2, 3
...Ground-Cover
<60
cm
60-180cm
>180cm
...Hedge
...Wind-swept
...Covering Banks
...Patio Pot
...Edging Borders
...Back of Border
...Poisonous
...Adjacent to Water
...Bog Garden
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Winter-Flowering
...Fragrant
...Not Fragrant
...Exhibition
...Standard Plant is 'Ball on Stick'
...Upright Branches or Sword-shaped leaves
...Plant to Prevent Entry to Human or Animal
...Coastal Conditions
...Tolerant on North-facing Wall
...Cut Flower
...Potted Veg Outdoors
...Potted Veg Indoors
...Thornless
...Raised Bed Outdoors Veg
...Grow in Alkaline Soil A-F, G-L, M-R,
S-Z
...Grow in Acidic Soil
...Grow in Any Soil
...Grow in Rock Garden
...Grow Bulbs Indoors

Uses of Bedding
...Bedding Out
...Filling In
...Screen-ing
...Pots and Troughs
...Window Boxes
...Hanging Baskets
...Spring Bedding
...Summer Bedding
...Winter Bedding
...Foliage instead of Flower
...Coleus Bedding Photos for use in Public Domain 1

Uses of Bulb
...Other than Only Green Foliage
...Bedding or Mass Planting
...Ground-Cover
...Cut-Flower
...Tolerant of Shade
...In Woodland Areas
...Under-plant
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Covering Banks
...In Water
...Beside Stream or Water Garden
...Coastal Conditions
...Edging Borders
...Back of Border or Back-ground Plant
...Fragrant Flowers
...Not Fragrant Flowers
...Indoor
House-plant

...Grow in a Patio Pot
...Grow in an Alpine Trough
...Grow in an Alpine House
...Grow in Rock Garden
...Speciman Plant
...Into Native Plant Garden
...Naturalize in Grass
...Grow in Hanging Basket
...Grow in Window-box
...Grow in Green-house
...Grow in Scree
...Naturalized Plant Area
...Grow in Cottage Garden
...Attracts Butterflies
...Attracts Bees
...Resistant to Wildlife
...Bulb in Soil:-
......Chalk
......Clay
......Sand
......Lime-Free (Acid)
......Peat

Uses of Rose
Rose Index

...Bedding 1, 2
...Climber /Pillar
...Cut-Flower 1, 2
...Exhibition, Speciman
...Ground-Cover
...Grow In A Container 1, 2
...Hedge 1, 2
...Climber in Tree
...Woodland
...Edging Borders
...Tolerant of Poor Soil 1, 2
...Tolerant of Shade
...Back of Border
...Adjacent to Water
...Page for rose use as ARCH ROSE, PERGOLA ROSE, COASTAL CONDITIONS ROSE, WALL ROSE, STANDARD ROSE, COVERING BANKS or THORNLESS ROSES.
...FRAGRANT ROSES
...NOT FRAGRANT ROSES


Topic -
Camera Photo Galleries showing all 4000 x 3000 pixels of each photo on your screen that you can then click and drag it to your desktop as part of a Plant Selection Process:-

RHS Garden at Wisley

Plant Supports -
When supporting plants in a bed, it is found that not only do those plants grow upwards, but also they expand their roots and footpad sideways each year. Pages
1
, 2, 3, 8, 11,
12, 13,
Plants 4, 7, 10,
Bedding Plants 5,
Plant Supports for Unknown Plants 5
,
Clematis Climbers 6,
the RHS does not appear to either follow it's own pruning advice or advice from The Pruning of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers by George E. Brown.
ISBN 0-571-11084-3 with the plants in Pages 1-7 of this folder. You can see from looking at both these resources as to whether the pruning carried out on the remainder of the plants in Pages 7-15 was correct.

Narcissus (Daffodil) 9,
Phlox Plant Supports 14, 15

Coleus Bedding Foliage Trial - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, Index

National Trust Garden at Sissinghurst Castle
Plant Supports -
Pages for Gallery 1

with Plant Supports
1, 5, 10
Plants
2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9,
11, 12
Recommended Rose Pruning Methods 13
Pages for Gallery 2
with Plant Supports
2
,
Plants 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Dry Garden of
RHS Garden at
Hyde Hall

Plants - Pages
without Plant Supports
Plants 1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Nursery of
Peter Beales Roses
Display Garden

Roses Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Nursery of
RV Roger

Roses - Pages
A1,A2,A3,A4,A5,
A6,A7,A8,A9,A10,
A11,A12,A13,A14,
B15,
B16,B17,B18,B19,
B20,
B21,B22,B23,B24,
B25,
B26,B27,B28,B29,
B30,
C31,C32,C33,C34,
C35,
C36,C37,C38,C39,
C40,
C41,CD2,D43,D44,
D45,
D46,D47,D48,D49,
E50,
E51,E52,F53,F54,
F55,
F56,F57,G58,G59,
H60,
H61,I62,K63,L64,
M65,
M66,N67,P68,P69,
P70,
R71,R72,S73,S74,
T75,
V76,Z77, 78,

Damage by Plants in Chilham Village - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4

Pavements of Funchal, Madeira
Damage to Trees - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13
for trees 1-54,
14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
for trees 55-95,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, 33, 34, 35,
36, 37,
for trees 95-133,
38, 39, 40,
41, 42, 43, 44, 45,
for trees 133-166

Chris Garnons-Williams
Work Done - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Identity of Plants
Label Problems - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11

Ron and Christine Foord - 1036 photos only inserted so far - Garden Flowers - Start Page of each Gallery
AB1 ,AN14,BA27,
CH40,CR52,DR63,
FR74,GE85,HE96,

Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens - 1187
A 1, 2, Photos - 43
B 1, Photos - 13
C 1, Photos - 35
D 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
Photos - 411
with Plants causing damage to buildings in Chilham Village and Damage to Trees in Pavements of Funchal
E 1, Photos - 21
F 1, Photos - 1
G 1, Photos - 5
H 1, Photos - 21
I 1, Photos - 8
J 1, Photos - 1
K 1, Photos - 1
L 1, Photos - 85
with Label Problems
M 1, Photos - 9
N 1, Photos - 12
O 1, Photos - 5
P 1, Photos - 54
Q 1, Photos -
R 1, 2, 3,
Photos - 229
S 1, Photos - 111
T 1, Photos - 13
U 1, Photos - 5
V 1, Photos - 4
W 1, Photos - 100
with Work Done by Chris Garnons-Williams
X 1 Photos -
Y 1, Photos -
Z 1 Photos -
Articles/Items in Ivydene Gardens - 88
Flower Colour, Num of Petals, Shape and
Plant Use of:-
Rock Garden
within linked page

 

Topic -
Fragrant Plants as a Plant Selection Process for your sense of smell:-

Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an Acid Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
1
, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3
Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves
1
, 2
Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5
Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit
1
, 2, 3
Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2
Night-scented Flowering Plants
1
, 2


Topic -
Website User Guidelines


My Gas Service Engineer found Flow and Return pipes incorrectly positioned on gas boilers and customers had refused to have positioning corrected in 2020.
 

The following Container Gardening for Wildlife is from Appendix 1 of The Wildlife Garden Month-by-Month by Jackie Bennett. Published by David & Charles in 1993. ISBN
0 7153 0033 4 :-

 

"It is quite possible to entice wildlife into even the most unpromising paved areas by utilising containers. Several mini-habitats can be created by growing a carefully selected range of trees, shrubs and flowers in pots, tubs, window boxes and hanging baskets.
If the space is enclosed by walls or high fences, it is important to let the passing wildlife know that this area is a source of food and shelter. Aim to add height and greenery with a small native tree grown in a good-sized wooden barrel and add 1 or 2 berry-bearing shrubs. Clothe the walls in climbers for nesting birds and introduce nectar-rich flowers for the insects. Finally, put up a nesting box amongst the climbers and find a place for a feeding table in winter and a bird bath in the summer. Despite the lack of grass and full-size trees, a surprising range of creatures will begin to inhabit this new garden.

DON'T FORGET HERBS

Herbs are amongst the most useful wildlife plants, including borage, mint, chives and rosemary, and are ideally suited to container growing. Do allow them to flower though, even at the expense of a continuous supply of leaves for cooking.

 

FOUR-SEASON WINDOW BOX

Try planting a window box with the following selection of evergreens, perennials, bulbs and bedding plants, for an all-the-year-round display.

WINTER
Ivy, hellebores, snowdrops

SPRING
Ivy, yellow crocus and grape hyacinths

SUMMER
Ivy, white alyssum and dwarf lavender

AUTUMN
Ivy, meadow saffron.

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX 2 has a Traditional Wildlife Garden Plan and a Garden Plan for Urban Wildlife.

STEP-BY-STEP CONTAINER PLANTING

Make sure the container has adequate drainage holes and that they are free of obstruction.

Put a layer of broken clay pots or crockery over the base of the container.

Half-fill with a multi-purpose potting compost.

Place the plants in position and fill around the root ball with more compost. Press down firmly.

Water well and add more compost if necessary, to bring the level up to 1 inch (2.5 cm) below the rim of the container.
 

Use the self-watering containers and potting mix detailed in the Vegetable Gallery Site Map Page rather the the pots or multi-purpose potting compost detailed above. Provide an outside water tap and watering can, so that you can irrigate the pots without traipsing the can through the house.

 

NOTE
To boost the wildlife habitat in a concrete yard, make a pile of logs in one corner. As the wood begins to break down, it will house beetles, spiders and slugs - great food for birds. The cool, damp habitat may be secluded enough to offer daytime cover to a toad, or possibly frogs and newts from a nearby pond.

RECOMMENDED PLANTS

TREES
Rowan (Sorbus aucuparia 'Fastigiata') Dwarf form (120 inches (300 cms)). Flowers for insects and berries for birds.

Willow (Salix caprea 'Pendula') Weeping form (120 inches (300 cms)). Catkins for insects, young leaves for caterpillars.

SHRUBS
Buddleia davidii (120 inches (300 cms)) Nectar from flowers for butterflies.

Cotoneaster 'Hybridus Pendulus' (120 inches (300 cms)) Berries and flowers.

Hawthorn (Craaegus monogyna) (180 inches (500 cms)) can be pruned hard to keep it within bounds. Secure nesting sites for birds. Berries and flowers.

Holly (Ilex aquifolium) (to 180 inches (500 cms)) a male and female bush are needed to be sure of berries. Nesting cover for birds.

Lavender (Lavendula angustifolia) Scented and attracts bees, flowers.

--->


 

CLIMBERS
Honeysuckle (Lonicera periclymenum) Summer wall and fence cover. Has nectar and flowers.

Ivy (Hedera helix) All-year-round wall and fence cover. Has nectar and flowers.

FLOWERS FOR NECTAR
Alyssum
Candytuft (Iberis)
Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus).
Nicotiana
Night-scented stock (Matthiola bicornis).
Pot marigold (Calendula officinalis).

 

PLAN OF A SMALL ENCLOSED PATIO WITH CONTAINERS
Exit doorway on left with window on its left and window box outside window. Group of pots between door and window. Another group of pots in corner after window with one of the pots containing a tree. A wall basket between that corner and the corner on the right where a barrel with ivy is growing up the wall. A bench is half-way down to the bottom right corner with its pot group and a pile of logs. A bird table is half-way across to the bottom left corner with its large pot." - Use a 4 inch (10 cm) plastic pipe through the wall to allow non-flying creatures access from the public area outside to your garden area.

The following Growing Marsh Plants in Containers is from The Wildlife Garden Month-by-Month by Jackie Bennett. Published by David & Charles in 1993. ISBN
0 7153 0033 4 :-

Where space is limited, or simply as an alternative to conventional patio plants, it is possible to grow moisture-loving species in pots and tubs. The container needs to retain water - a terracotta pot which has a porouus structure would not be suitable, but a glazed ceramic pot would work well. Plastic pots can also be used - like the self-watering containers detailed in the Vegetable Gallery Site Map Page. Choose a pot at least 12 (30) deep and 16 (40) across. The best way to ensure the compost stays wet is to stand the whole pot in a substantial tray of water, so that the marsh can draw up moisture as it is needed (there is a water reservoir in the self-watering pots detailed above). Ordinary plant saucers will not hold enough water, and something deeper like a large kitchen roasting tin, which may not look so elegant, will do the job more effectively.
Spring is an ideal time to plant moisture-loving plants. Fill the container with a loam-based potting compost, insert the plants and water until soaked. Choose plants that won't outgrow the limited space too quickly. Include a selection of tall-growing species like purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), sweet flag (Acorus calamus) and ragged robin (Lychnis flos-cuculi) alongside smaller plants like bogbean (Menyanthes trifoliata) and x-lips (Primula elatior). Avoid lady's smock (Cardamine pratensis) and water mint (Mentha aquatica) which can spread too quickly.
Keep the water in the base tray topped up, using rainwater collected in a water butt where possible. Keeping the tray full of water is particularly important in long, hot, dry spells, although in spring and autumn the naturall rainfall will probably be adequate. Cut back the foliage in the autumn to prevent the pots becoming choked with decaying material. Repot the plants every 2 or 3 years when they start to outgrow their containers. In the second year after planting, the plants may have used up the nutrients in the compost and will need an extra boost from a slow-release fertiliser.

MOISTURE-LOVING NATIVE PLANTS
Plant / Use of Plant

 

Height


 

 

Flower Colour

 

Flowering Time
 

Bog Bean (Menyanthes trifoliata) /
Moths

10 (25)

White

Mid-Summer

Globe Flower
(Trollius europaeus /

24 (60)

Yellow

Early Summer

Oxlip
(Primula elatior) /
Bee plant,
Butterfly nectar plant

6 (15)

Pale Yellow

Late spring

Primrose
(Primula vulgaris) /
Butterfly nectar plant

4 (10)

Pale Yellow

Mid-spring

Purple Loosestrife
(Lythrum salicaria) /
Bee plant,
Butterfly nectar plant

36 (90)

Pink-purple

Summer

Ragged Robin
(Lychnis flos-cuculi) /
Butterfly nectar plant

24 (60)

Pink

Summer

Sweet Flag
(Acorus calamus) /
 

24 (60)

Green

Mid-summer

Bog Arum
(Calla palustris) /

Naturalised in places in Britain

6 (15)

Yellow-green

Summer

Hemp Agrimony
(Eupatorium cannabinum) /
Bee plant,
Butterfly nectar plant

48 (120)

Reddish-pink

Late summer

Lady's Smock
(Cardamine pratensis) /
Attractive to Hoverflies,
Caterpillar food plant,
Butterfly nectar plant

9 (23)

Pale pink

Spring

Marsh Betony
(Stachys palustris) /
Bee plant

12 (30)

Purple

Summer

Marsh Cinquefoil
(Potentilla palustris) /
 

9 (23)

Dark red

Summer

Marsh St John's Wort
(Hypericum elodes) /

6 (15)

Pale yellow

Summer

Meadowsweet
(Filipendula ulmaria) /

36 (90)

Creamy-white

Summer

The following Planning a Herb Bed or Garden is from The Wildlife Garden Month-by-Month by Jackie Bennett. Published by David & Charles in 1993. ISBN
0 7153 0033 4 :-

TOP HERBS FOR WILDLIFE
Although there are a huge number of culinary and medicinal herbs which can be grown, not all are relevant to wildlife. The herbs in the fourth column describe the best herbs for attracting garden wildlife.

PREPARING THE SITE
The best location for a herb bed is one which gets a lot of sun and where the soil is already well drained. Most herbs dislike getting waterlogged roots and can tolerate almost drought conditions - in fact, those like rosemary and marjoram with Mediterranean ancestry, improve in taste, scent and flower growth in a sunny location.

If the soil is not ideal (heavy clay for instance), it is possible to add some coarse grit to aid drainage. However, it might be smpler and more productive to grow the herbs in pots - like the self-watering containers detailed in the Vegetable Gallery Site Map Page, putting in a good layer of gravel before adding the compost.

The ground should be dug thoroughly, removing any weeds --->

and large stones. Lay brick paths, edging tiles or wooden dividers before planting the herbs.

HERBS FOR LESS-THAN-IDEAL CONDITIONS
Although most herbs prefer a sunny position in a well-drained soil, there are some which will tolerate shade and a heavier soil. The resulting plants may not do as well but there is no need to give up the idea of growing herbs altogether and the wildlife will still find them useful.

Mint (Mentha) can tolerate shade although it does tend to grow towards the light and become crooked and leggy.

Tansy (Tanecetum vulgare) is an excellent native plant for butterflies and it is not too fussy about growing conditions.

Lovage (Levisticum officinale), a relative of the fennel, is also worth growing for its young leaves which add a celery flavour to soups and stews. It will grow quite adequately in a dark, damp spot and the flowers produced, although not as abundant as they should be, will provide nectar for hoverflies, wasps and bees.

Comfrey (Symphytum x uplandicum) should be included purely for its leaves which are a reliable food source for moth and butterfly caterpillars.

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) is another strong grower in less than ideal conditions. Its white or pale yellow flowers rely on bees for their pollination.

--->

Garden chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium) is an annual herb, greatly prized for the flavour of its parsley-like leaves. It will tolerate some shade, but prefers a well-drained soil.

Great burnet (Sanguisorba officinalis) is a tall native herb that prefers a damp habitat and a heavy clay soil. The tiny crimson flowers appear from mid-summer to early autumn.

Angelica (Angelica archangelica), originally from central Europe, is widely naturalised in Britain. It will do well in a shady spot in damp soil and has huge seedheads in early autumn.

PLANTING AND MAINTENANCE CALENDAR
Late Summer - prepare site

Autumn - Plant shrubs and pot-grown perennials

Spring - Sow seeds of annuals

Late Spring - Sow seeds of biennials

Summer - Keep beds free of weeds; water container plants. Adas Colour Atlas of Weed Seedlings by J.B Williams and J.R. Morrison provides photos to the 40 most common weeds afflicting gardens and arable farm land. ISBN 0-7234-0929-3

Instead of snipping off the flowers as they appear, leave a few plants of parsley, mint, marjoram and lemon balm to flower naturally. Many more insects will visit the plants and consequently the herb garden will be a richer feeding ground for birds.

TOP HERBS FOR WILDLIFE
Herb - Angelica (Angelica archangelica)
Type - Biennial
wildflower value - Flowers - hoverflies, bees.
Leaves - butterflies, caterpillars.
Seedheads - greenfinches, bluetits

Borage (borago officinalis)
Annual
Flowers - bees

Chives (Allium schoenoprasum)
Perennial
Flowers - bees, butterflies

Comfrey (Symphytum uplandicum)
Perennial
Leaves - moths, butterflies

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare0
Perennial
Flowers - bees, wasps, hoverflies
Leaves - caterpillars

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis)
Perennial
Flowers - lacewings, bees

Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
Shrub
Flowers - bees, butterflies

Marjoram (Origanum vulgare)
Perennial
Flowers - bees, butterflies

Mint (Mentha - all types)
Perennial
Flowers - bees, butterflies, moths

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)
Shrub
Flowers - bees, butterflies, hoverflies

Thyme (Thymus - all types)
Perennial / shrub
Flowers - bees, butterflies

The following Recommended Bulbs is from The Wildlife Garden Month-by-Month by Jackie Bennett. Published by David & Charles in 1993. ISBN
0 7153 0033 4 :-

RECOMMENDED BULBS
Name - Bluebell (Scilla non-scripta)
Use of plant - Bee plant, Butterfly nectar plant
Site - Hedgerows, woodland
Depth of soil above the bulb - 2 (5)

Crocus (Purple) (Crocus tomasinianus)
Butterfly nectar plant
Lawns, borders, under deciduous trees. 3 (8)

Crocus (Yellow) (Crocus chrysanthus)
Butterfly nectar plant
Lawns, borders, under deciduous trees. 3(8)

Grape Hyacinth (Muscari neglectum)
Bee plant, Butterfly nectar plant.
Lawns, borders.
3 (8)

Ramsons Garlic (Allium ursinum)
Butterfly nectar plant. 3 (8)

Snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis)
Under deciduous trees, shady borders. 2 (5)

Wild Daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus)
Bee plant.
Lawns, banks. 3 (8)

Winter Aconite (Eranthis hyemalis)
Under deciduous trees, shady borders. 2 (5)

The following Incorporating Wildfflowers into an existing lawn is from The Wildlife Garden Month-by-Month by Jackie Bennett. Published by David & Charles in 1993. ISBN
0 7153 0033 4 :-

INCORPORATING WILDFLOWERS INTO AN EXISTING LAWN
There are basically 2 ways of doing this, both of which can be implemented in early autumn. The first involves sowing seed, the second planting pot-grown plants. Whichever method is chosen, the best results will be obtained with a lawn that is already patchy and weak in growth. The lush green grass of a well-fed lawn is likely to swamp any wildflowers that are introduced.

SOWING WILDFLOWER SEED INTO AN EXISTING LAWN
Begin by giving the lawn a thorough raking with a metal rake to remove moss, dead grass and leaves. Water thoroughly and sow the seed at the manufacturer's recommended rate.

ADDING POT-GROWN WILDFLOWERS TO AN EXISTING LAWN
After the last cut of the season is a good time to put in pot-grown wildflowers. More and more nurseries are stocking wildflowers in pots, but remember to choose species which will suit your intended regime of meadow maintenance. Place the plants in groups, with individual plants 8-16 (20-40) apart. Remove a plug of earth the same size as the pot, using a bulb planter or trowel. Knock the plants from their pots and place them in the holes, firming down the soil and watering well afterwards.

TYPICAL MEADOW MIXTURE
20% Flowering native perennials (as below)
40% Crested dog-tail (native grass)
30% Fescue (non-native grass)
10% Bent (lawn grass)

SPRING-FLOWERING MEADOW PERENNIALS
Bladder campion (Silene vulgaris)
Cowslip (Primula veris)
Lady's bedstraw (Galium verum)
Meadow buttercup (Ranunculus acris)

SUMMER-FLOWERING MEADOW PERENNIALS
Betony (stachys officinalis)
Bird's foot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus)
Field scabious (Knautia arvensis)
Greater Knapweed
(Centaurea scabiosa)
Meadow cranesbill (Geranium pratense)
Musk mallow (Malva moschata)
Ox-eye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare)
Rough hawkbit (Leontodon hispidus)
Selfheal (Prunella vulgaris)

 

Lindum Turf sell wildflower Mats for your new wildflower lawn instead of part of your old lawn

as
well as
Lindum's Wildflower Mat on Lindum's extensive green roof substrate for use as a Wildflower Green Roof

or
could be used to create a wildflower lawn on a back garden, whose ground is currently covered in concrete, tarmac, brick or stone.

The following Establishing a 'No Go' Area is from The Wildlife Garden Month-by-Month by Jackie Bennett. Published by David & Charles in 1993. ISBN
0 7153 0033 4 :-

It is important to nominate a part of the garden as a 'no-go' area for humans, which can be left deliberately untidy. Usually this is some spot well away from the house and preferably shielded by shrubs or trees, but it might equally be behind a garden shed or garage.

 

THE WOODPILE
Old untreated timber or unwanted logs can be piled up to provide shelter for a range of creatures. Choose a shady spot to prevent the wood from drying out in the sun. If possible, use a mixture of native woods such as elm, oak or ash which will guarantee a wider range of insect species. Logs 6-9 (15-23) in diameter make a good pile.

The first wildlife to inhabit the pile will probably be fungi in the early autumn, but in time it will become home to spiders, beetles, wood wasps, solitary bees, slugs and snails. These will then attract bird predators, particularly wrens and blackbirds, who will pick over the pile in search of a meal. The insects will also provide food for wood mice, voles and hedgehogs.

First-year newts, after leaving the pond, may well spend large amounts of time in the damp shelter of a log pile.

---->

GROWING NETTLES FOR BUTTERFLIES
Stinging nettles are the caterpillar food plants for commas, peacocks, red admirals, and small tortoiseshells who all rely on nettle leaves and shoots for their survival. If there is an existing nettle patch, this may need to be contained with a fence, wall or path. Better still, clumps of nettles can be transferred to large tubs or barrels sunk into the ground to prevent the roots from encroaching into the garden proper.

As the emerging caterpillars prefer fresh, new leaves to feed on, it is a good idea to cut back half the patch in early or mid-summer to encourage new growth. This is particularly important for commas and small tortoiseshells who regularly have 2 broods a year - the first in the spring, the second in mid-summer. The adults will seek out the new shoots to lay their eggs.

Nettles can be introduced into the garden if they are not growing naturally. In late winter, dig up some roots about 4 (10) long which are bearing yound shoots. Bury the roots in pots of garden soil and keep cutting back the shoots to 3 (7.5). By late spring the new plants can be put out into the untidy area.

The life-cycle of many butterflies extends over much of the year, so if you can put the plants that are used in its 4 stages in that untidy area, then it is more likely that you will see the butterfly, since YOU WILL NEVER BE TIDYING UP THAT NO-GO AREA. ---->

LEAF PILES AND HEDGEHOG HABITATS
if hedgehogs are to take up residence in the garden, they need a dry, secure place for hibernation from late autumn to early spring. A pile of dead leaves or garden prunings heaped into a corner will often be acceptable, but it is also possible to contruct a hibernation 'box'.

Use an upturned wooden box (untreated wood) and cut an entrance out of one of the side panels, 4-5 (10-12) square. This is large enough to allow the hedgehog to enter but small enough to prevent dogs or foxes getting in.

A covered entrance tunnel can also be constructed using 2 rows of house bricks stood on their sides and a plank of wood. This helps to keep the interior of the box dry, but is not essential.

Cover the box with a sheet of polythene to keep out the rain, and a mound of dry leaves or brushwood to disguise the exterior. Add a handful of straw or dry leaves as bedding.

HABITAT BOOSTERS
Asheet of corrugated iron does not look very attractive, but if you happen to have one lying around, it is worth keeping. As the sun warms the metal, the 'tunnels' beneath become inviting resting quarters for slow worms and grass snakes. Equally, an old paving slab laid over a hollow in the ground and in a shady spot makes a damp hiding place for frogs and toads.

The following Planting in Gravel and Paving is from The Wildlife Garden Month-by-Month by Jackie Bennett. Published by David & Charles in 1993. ISBN
0 7153 0033 4 :-

Many plants enjoy the dry growing conditions and refected warmth of gravel, stone chippings or paving. It is relatively easy to incorporate native species into existing paving schemes or to lay areas of gravel.

MAKING A GRAVEL BED
The underlying soil should be well-drained and gritty. If it is too heavy, mix it with equal parts of rock chippings or gravel. If the ground area is concrete/ tarmac/ stone/ paver or brick, cover the area with a layer of equal parts of top dressing and stone chippings to a 2 (5cm) depth, before continuing as below.

Cover the area with a layer of sand 1 (2.5) deep.

Finish the bed with a 1 (2.5) layer of gravel or 0.25 (0.5) stone chippings.

Water plants well before removing them from their pots. Use a narrow trowel to make holes the same size as the root ball and firm them in gently.

Water new plants thoroughly and sprinkle more gravel over the surface if necessary

PLANTING IN PAVING
If new paths or patios are to be laid, it is worth considering leaving some gaps between the paving stones as planting pockets. If the stones are already laid, it is still possible to incorporate a wide range of species.

The simplest way is to take up some of the stones, perhaps create a chequeboard effect. This is better done in a random pattern, rather than taking out every other stone. The earth beneath the stones shuld be workable and weed-free. Dig out the earth to a depth of 6-9 (15-23) and mix with an equal quantity of gravel or stone chippings. Replace the soil mixture and plant in the normal way.

Brick paths or patios can be planted in the same way. Take out any bricks that are already damaged or crumbling and fill the gaps as above.

PLANTS FOR PAVING AND GRAVEL
The following plants will thrive in a shallow, well-drained soil in full sun and will self-seed easily:

Broom
(Cytisus scoparius)
Native or naturalised species, Bee plant

Common Toadflax
Native or naturalised species, Bee plant

Globe Thistle
(Echinops sphaerocephalus)
Bee plant, Butterfly nectar plant

Great Mullein
(Verbascum phlomoides)
Native or naturalised species, Large number of associated insects

Hawkweed
(Hieracium murorum)
Native or naturalised species

Lady's Bedstraw
(Galium verum)
Native or naturalised species

Maiden Pink
(Dianthus deltoides)
Native or naturalised species

Thyme
(Thymus species) Especially the native Thymus praecox
Bee plant

Trailing St John's Wort
(Hypericum humifusum)
Native or naturalised species

White Campion
(Silene latifolia)
Native or naturalised species

Yarrow
(Achillea millefolium)
Native or naturalised species

The following Constructing a Rock Bank is from The Wildlife Garden Month-by-Month by Jackie Bennett. Published by David & Charles in 1993. ISBN
0 7153 0033 4 :-

If the garden has no manmade rock garden or natural outcrops of rock for planting, it is possible to make a rock bank to provide a useful wildlife habitat. This is a simple construction and far less costly than a full-scale rock garden.

Stack the stones randomly to form a double-sided wall to the desired height and length.

Between each layer of stones, add a mixture of stone chippings or gravel and loam potting compost (this makes a good growing medium for rock plants, but if not available any poor, stony garden soil can be substituted). There are better soil mixtures detailed for many rock garden plants in Colour Wheel Rock Gallery.

Leave some gaps between the stones without any soil, to allow access to the interior for small mammals and creatures.

Lay more stones or rocks across the top of the structure to form a 'lid'. The planting pockets can be planted with any of the rock or wall plants listed in the next column and the column below it.

RECOMMENDED PLANTS FOR ROCK BANKS AND GARDENS
Plant - Cheddar Pink
(Dianthus gratiano-poliatanus)
Flower - Early Summer
Height - 8 (20)
Wildlife value - Moths, butterflies

Common Pink
(Dianthus plumarius)
Summer 8 (20)
Bees

Hairy Thyme
(Thymus praecox)
Summe 3-4 (8-10)
Bees

Harebell
(Campanula rotundifolia)
Late summer
12 (30)
Bees

Hebe 'Autumn Glory'
Autumn
24-36 x 24-36
(60-90 x 60-90)
Butterflies

Hebe 'Carl Teschner'
Summer
12 x 24-36
(30 x 60-90)
Hoverflies, bees

Herb Robert
(Geranium robertianum)
Summer 12 (30)
Bees

Ling (Heather)
(Calluna vulgaris)
Late summer
12-24 x (30-60 x )
Ground cover for birds, grass snakes and slow worms

Purple Saxifrage
(Saxifraga oppositifolia)
Summer 3 (8)
Butterflies, bees

Rock Rose
Bees, insects

Spring Gentian
Butterflies, bees

The following Planting a Native Hedge is from The Wildlife Garden Month-by-Month by Jackie Bennett. Published by David & Charles in 1993. ISBN
0 7153 0033 4 :-

Different types of hedges were planted for different purposes: a double hedge would mark an important boundary whilst a hedge designed to contain livestock would be particularly impenetrable at the base. Almost incidentally they became shelters and pathways for wildlife, harbouring birds, mammals and insects. In the garden, a hedge of native species can serve both as a wildlife provider and as an effective division between neighbouring plots.

CHOOSING THE SPECIES
The use of only 1 species in a hedge as a wildlife corridor is limited. A mixed hedge provides a much wider resource and a greater number of animal and flower species will soon become associated with it. A balanced hedge might include a large proportion of one of the mainstay species such as hawthorn, which forms a dense, thorny structure, as well as blossoms and berries. This may be interspersed with 4 or 5 other species which flower and fruit at different times, and should include at least 1 evergreen to provide shelter in winter.

TREES/SHRUBS SUITABLE FOR HEDGING

Alder Buckthorn
(Frangula alnus)
Deciduous, fruit

Beech
(Fagus sylvatica)
Slow-growing, deciduous, autumn colour

Blackthorn
(Prunus spinosa)
Deciduous, blossom, fruit

Crab Apple
(Malus sylvestris)
Deciduous, blossom, fruit

Dog Rose
(Rosa canina)
Deciduous, blossom, hips

Elm
(Ulmus procera)
Deciduous

Field Maple
(Acer campestre)
Deciduous, autumn colour

Hawthorn
(Crataegus monogyna)
Deciduous, blossom, berries

Hazel
(Corylus avellana)
Deciduous, catkins, nuts

Holly
(Ilex aquifolium)
Slow-growing, evergreen, berries

Wild Privet
(Ligustrum ovalifolium)
Quick-growing, evergreen

Yew
(Taxus baccata)
Slow-growing, evergreen

HOW TO PLANT A HEDGE

Choose two-year-old seedlings, which are large enough to handle, but should not need staking.

Mark out the length of the hedge with canes and string. It does not have to be a straight line, a curving hedge works just as well.

Dig a trench in front of the line, 24 (60) wide and 18 (45) deep, running the entire length of the proposed hedge. Remove weed roots and large stones whilst digging.

Add a layer of organic matter (garden compost or well-rotted manure) and mix with the loose soil at the bottom of the trench.

Set the plants, 12-18 (30-45) apart and at the same depth as they were in the nursery (shown by the soil mark on the stem), adding more soil to the bottom of the trench, if necessary, to ensure the plant will sit at the right depth.

Holding the plant upright, fill around the roots with loose soil, until it reaches the soil mark, firming it down well.

IMMEDIATE AFTERCARE

Water the new plants thoroughly, making sure the water soaks down around the roots. Cut back the top and side growths by at least one third - this will encourage side branching and bushy growth.

WILDLIFE USES FOR HEDGING

Caterpillars of brimstone butterflies feed on alder buckthorn.

Blackthorn, hawthorn, hazel and privet provide nectar for many species of butterfly.

Thrushes, dunnocks, garden warblers and finches use the hedgerow for nesting

Hedgehogs, voles and woodmice shelter and feed in the hedge bottom.

Hawthorn, blackthorn and holly provide berries for birds in winter

 

"THE LIFE AND DEATH OF A FLAILED CORNISH HEDGE - This details that life and death from July 1972 to 2019, with the following result:-
"Of the original 186 flowering species (including sub-species), the 5 colour forms and the 8 unconfirmed species, (193 flowering species in total) only 55 have persisted throughout the 35 years of flailing since 1972. Of these 55 species:-
3 species are unchanged.
11 species have disastrously increased.
41 species are seriously reduced in number, most by over 90%. Of these, 18 are now increasing under the somewhat lighter flailing regime. 13 are still decreasing, and 35 have only a few specimens (from 1-12 plants) left.
Of the rest of the original species:-
37 species and 3 colour forms have disappeared, then reappeared after varying lengths of time. Of these, 20 have fewer than 6 plants, most of them only 1 or 2, and are liable to disappear again. Only 6 of the recovered species look capable of surviving in the longer term.
23 species have reappeared, then disappeared again due to being flailed before they could set seed or to being overcome by rank weeds." further details in Butterfly Gallery.

FLOWERING WALL PLANTS
Small-leaved Cotoneaster
(Cotoneaster microphyllus)
Fruit / berries / nuts for birds / mammals

Hoary Cinquefoil
(Potentilla argentea)
Butterfly nectar plant, Bee plant

Houseleek
(Sempervivum tectorum)
Large number of associated insects

Ivy-leaved Toadflax
(Cymbalaria muralis)
Butterfly nectar plant, Bee plant

London Pride
(Saxifraga x urbinum)
Butterfly nectar plant

Red Valerian
(Centranthus ruber)
Native or naturalised species

Round-leaved Cranesbill
(Geranium rotundifolium)
Native or naturalised species

Stonecrops
Biting stonecrop (sedum acre)
White stonecrop
(Sedum album)
Butterfly nectar plants

Wallflower
(Cheiranthus cheiri)
Butterfly nectar plant

Wall Rocket
(Diplotaxis tenuifolia)
Bee plant

Arabis
(Arabis albida)
Bee plant, Butterfly nectar plant.

Yellow Corydalis
(Corydalis lutea)
 

The following Planting a Native Hedge is from The Wildlife Garden Month-by-Month by Jackie Bennett. Published by David & Charles in 1993. ISBN
0 7153 0033 4 :-

MAINTENANCE

Each spring, whilst the hedge is still forming, prune the top and side shoots by one third. Do not leave the central stem to grow to the desired height of the hedge before cutting back. Regular pruning will ensure that by the time the hedge does reach its final height, it will have developed a strong, dense framework

It is a good idea to apply a mulch of garden compost, leaf mould or chopped bark around the plants each spring (if you have trees growing besides the public road on its verge, then in the autumn when its leaves fall to the ground below, you can use your rotary mower to mow them up and put them as a mulch in the the hedge bottom.). This will discourage weeds (which may strangle the young hedge) and form a good environment for hedgerow plants and microscopic creatures. Adas Colour Atlas of Weed Seedlings by J.B Williams and J.R. Morrison provides photos to the 40 most common weeds afflicting gardens and arable farm land. ISBN 0-7234-0929-3

CLIPPING

The main difference between conventional hedge care and those managed for wildlife is in the clipping. Wildlife hedges should never be clipped before nesting is completely finished; usually it is safe to do so in late summer or early autumn, but in doubt, leave until the winter.

WILDLIFE TO EXPECT

Blackbirds, thrushes, dunnocks, sparrows, greenfinches and bullfinches all prefer the dense, protected growth of a hedge to any other nesting site. They will be joined in the summer, by shy, ground-feeding wrens, who search the leaf litter beneath the hedge for spiders and other insects. Many other garden birds like tits and robins will use the hedge simply as a convenient perch, for picking off caterpillars from the leafy growth. The hedge foliage is a particularly good breeding ground for moths such as the privet hawkmoth, garden spiders who leave their mark in the shape of finely woven webs and the often heard, but rarely seen, bush cricket. At ground level, the wildlife residents are most likely to be hedgehogs, wood mice and bank voles, although toads and frogs often hide in the shelter of a hedge bottom. In time a native hedge will become a busy wildlife corridor offering shelter, food and a convenient route from one part of the garden to another

HEDGEROW FLOWERS

Although the soil at the base of the hedge may be poor, a surprising number of wildflowers seem to thrive here. The orientation of the hedge will determine which flowers may be grown. South-facing hedges receive a good deal of sun whilst north faces may be in almost complete shade. Choose a selection of plants to suit the position of your hedge.
Most of the hedgerow flowers tolerate a dry, poor soil, but 1 or 2 such as primroses and lesser celandines need to be kept moist. Unless the hedge is by a stream or pool, it is unlikely that their needs will be met; they would be happier in a damp ditch or marshy area.
Pot-grown plants can be planted out any time from spring to autumn. In the first 2 years of the hedge's growth, avoid putting in the taller plants, such as sweet cicely, which may compete with the new hedging. It is also advisable to wait until the hedge is well-established (5 years or more) before putting in hedgerow climbers, like traveller's joy (Clematis vitalba). Its scrambling habit is ideal for dense, well-grown hedges, but it can easily strangle younger plants.
It is best to use small, healthy plants for the hedge bottom and not seedlings, whose roots may not be sufficiently developed to cope with the poor soil. Insert the new plants with a trowel and water thoroughly. Water regularly for the first 2 weeks - particularly if there is a hot, dry spell.

RECOMMENDED NATIVE HEDGEROW FLOWERS

Plant - Betony (Stachys officinalis)
Type - Perennial
Position -Sun or shade
Soil - Any
Wildlife value - bees, butterflies

Bluebell
(Scilla non-scripta)
Bulb
Sun or shade
Any
Bees, butterflies

Common Dog Violet
(Viola riviana)
Perennial
Part shade
Any
Caterpillar food plant for fritillary butterflies

Garlic Mustard
(Alliaria petiolata)
Biennial
Part shade
Any
Caterpillar food for orange tips, tortoiseshells and whites butterflies

Greater Stitchwort
(Stellaria holostea)
Perennial
Part shade
Any
Bees, moths, butterflies

Hedge Wounwort
(Stachys sylvatica)
Perennial
Part shade
Any
Bees, butterflies

Hedgerow Cranesbill
(Geranium pyrenaicum)
Perennial
Part shade
Any

Lesser Celandine
(Ranunculus ficaria)
Perennial
Part shade
Damp
Bees, butterflies
 

Primrose
(Primula vulgaris)
Perennial
Sun or shade
Damp
Butterflies (whites)

Red Campion
(Silene Dioca)
Perennial
Sun or shade
Any
Butterflies

Selfheal
(Prunella vulgaris)
Perennial
Sun or shade
Any
Bees, butterflies

Sweet Cicely
(Myrrhis odorata)
Perennial
Sun or shade
Any
Bees

White Deadnettle
(Lamium maculatum album)
Perennial
Sun or shade
Any
Bees

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