Ivydene Gardens Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery:
Night-Scented Flowering Plants Page 1 of 2

Ivydene Gardens Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery:
Night-Scented Flowering Plants Page 1 of 2

Botanical Plant Name

with link to
UK or
European Union
mail-order supplier for you to contact to buy this plant

Flower Colour

Sun Aspect of Full Sun,
Part Shade, Full Shade

with link to external website for photo/data

Flowering Months

with row in each month that it flowers in that colour in
STAGE 4A
12 BLOOM COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY
/

with link to
USA or
Canada
mail-order supplier

Height with Spacings or Width (W) in inches (cms)

1 inch =
2.5 cms
12 inches = 30 cms
40 inches = 100 cms

Foliage Colour


with row in relevant pages that it has foliage of that colour in
STAGE 4B
12 FOLIAGE COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY

or
Background Colour nearest to middle-aged leaf colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Soil Moisture:-
Dry,
Moist,
Wet

with link to Australia or New Zealand mail-order supplier

 

with data for rows in
STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY and
STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Pages

Plant Type is:-

A for Aquatic
Ann for Annual / Biennial
Ba for Bamboo
Bu for Bulb
Cl for Climber
Co for Conifer
F for Fern
G for Grass
H for Herb
P for Perennial
Rh for Rhodo-dendron, Azalea, Camellia
Ro for Rose
Sh for Shrub
So for Soft Fruit
To for Top Fruit
Tr for Tree
V for Vegetable
W for Wildflower

followed by:-
E for Evergreen,
D for Deciduous,
H for Herbaceous,
Alpine for being an Alpine as well as being 1 of above Plant Type /

 
Acid for Acidic,
Alk for Alkaline,
Any for AnySoil
 

with links to
STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES
1
, 2, 3
and
STAGE 3
ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERIES
1
, 2
pages
 

Comments and Use of Plant

How the scent is released:-

  • Rub or Break Leaf - Where the essential oil is in capsules deep inside a leaf, it is released by rubbing or breaking.
  • Brush Leaf - Where it is in cells close to the surface of the leaf, you need only to brush against it lightly.
  • Sunshine or Rain - And where it it is actually secreted on to the surface of the leaf, you can usually smell it without disturbing the leaf at all. Hot sunshine causes some scents to oxidise, while others seem to be most evident after rain.

When the scent is released and

What sort of scent it is.

  • Flower Perfume Group:-
    Indoloid.
    Aminoid.
    Heavy.
    Aromatic.
    Violet.
    Rose.
    Lemon.
    Fruit-scented.
    Animal-scented.
    Honey.
  • Leaf Perfume Group:-
    Turpentine.
    Camphor and Eucalyptus Group.
    Mint.
    Sulphur.
    Indoloid.
    Aminoid.
    Heavy.
    Aromatic.
    Violet.
    Rose.
    Lemon.
    Fruit-scented.
    Animal-scented.
    Honey.
  • Scent of Wood, Bark and Roots Group:-
    Aromatic.
    Turpentine.
    Rose.
    Violet.
    Stale Perspiration.
  • Scent of Fungi Group:-
    Indoloid.
    Aminoid.
    Sulphur.
    Aromatic.
    Rose.
    Violet.
    Fruit.
    Animal.
    Honey

Best Garden location for this Plant from Pathway - where Person is smelling that scent while on that Pathway.

Plant Photo

It is sad to reflect that in England so few gardens open to the public label their plants or label them so that the label is visible when that plant is in flower, so that visitors can identify; and then later locate and purchase that plant.

Few mail-order nurseries provide the detail as shown in my rose or heather galleries.

If you want to sell a product, it is best to display it. When I sold my Transit van, I removed its signage, cleaned it and took photos of the inside and outside before putting them onto an advert in Autotrader amongst more than 2000 other Transit vans - it was sold in 20 minutes.

If mail-order nurseries could put photos to the same complexity from start of the year to its end with the different foliage colours and stages of flowering on Wikimedia Commons, then the world could view the plant before buying it, and idiots like me would have valid material to work with.

I have been in the trade (until ill health forced my Sole Trader retirement in 2013) working in designing, constructing and maintaining private gardens for decades and since 2005 when this site was started, I have asked any nursery in the world to supply photos. R.V. Roger in Yorkshire allowed me to use his photos from his website in 2007 and when I got a camera to spend 5 days in July 2014 at my expense taking photos of his roses growing in his nursery field, whilst his staff was propagating them. I gave him a copy of those photos.

Abronia fragrans

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vanilla

 

 

Abronia umbellata

 

 

 

 

 

 

Honey

 

 

Calonyction aculeatum

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lily

 

 

Cestrum parqui

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heavy

 

 

Datura ceratocaula

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heavy

 

 

Datura chlorantha

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet

 

 

Datura fastuosa

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lily

 

 

Datura metel

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exotic

 

 

Datura meteloides

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soft

 

 

Datura suaveolens

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lily

 

 

Erinus selaginoides

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heavy

 

 

Gladiolus tristis

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clove

 

 

Hebenstreitia comosa

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lily-like

 

 

Heliotropium convolvulaceum

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spicy

 

 

Hesperantha buchrii

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clove

 

 

Hesperantha stanfordiae

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lily-like

 

 

Hesperis fragrans

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clove

 

 

Hesperis matronalis

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clove

 

 

Hesperis tristis

 

 

 

 

 

 

Violet

 

 

Hesperis violacea

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet

 

 

Linnaea borealis

 

 

 

 

 

 

Honeysuckle

 

 

Mentzelia ornata

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet

 

 

Mirabilis longiflora

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orange

 

 

Mirabilis jalapa

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heavy

 

 

Myosotis alpestris

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet

 

 

Myosotis macrantha

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soft

 

 

Nicotiana affinis

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet

 

 

Nicotiana suaveolens

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet

 

 

Nicotiana sylvestris

 

 

 

 

 

 

Freesias

 

 

Oenothera biennis

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet

 

 

Oenothera californica

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet

 

 

Oenothera drummondii

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vanilla

 

 

Oenothera eximia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lemon

 

 

Oenothera tetraptera

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vanilla

 

 

Oenothera triloba

 

 

 

 

 

 

Violet

 

 

Petunia violacea

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vanilla

 

 

Silene noctiflora

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carnation

 

 

Silene nutans

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carnation

 

 

Sisyrinchium odoratissimum

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exotic

 

 

Verbena teucrioides

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet

 

 

Zaluzianskya capensis

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet

 

 

Zaluzianskya villosa

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aromatic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY PAGES Links to pages in Table alongside on the left with Garden Design Topic Pages

Site Map

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

Plant Type
 

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 with its Cultivation Requirements

Alpines for Rock Garden (See Rock Garden Plant Flowers)

Alpine Shrubs and Conifers

The Alpine Meadow
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

The Alpine Border
1
, 2

Alpine Plants for a Purpose

The Alpines that Dislike Lime 1, 2

Alpines and Walls
Dry Sunny Walls 1a, b
Tops of Walls 2a, b
Dry Shady and Conifers 3a, b

Alpines and
Paving
1
, 2

Sink and Trough gardens
1
, 2

Aquatic
(Water Plants) for

Anti-erosion River-bank

Marginal Plants (Bog Garden Plants)
1
, 2

Oxy-genating Weeds

Water Lilies

Floating Plants

Water-side Plants
and Plants for Dry Margins next to a Pond
1
, 2

Wildlife Pond Plants

Annual for

----------------



 

 

ANY PLANT TYPE for
Cut Flowers in
January 1, 2
February
March 1, 2
April
May 1, 2
June 1, 2
July 1, 2
August
September
October
November
December

Exposed Sites

Sheltered Sites with Green-house Annuals from 1916

Extra Poor Soil with Half-Hardy Annuals from 1916

Very Rich Soil with Biennials from 1916

Gap-filling in Mixed Borders with Hardy Annuals from 1916

Patio Con-tainers

Cut Flowers
1
, 2, 3 Ever-lasting Flowers with Red Flowers from 1916

Attract-ing bene-ficial insects
1
, 2

Scent / Fra-grance with Annuals for Cool or Shady Places from 1916

Low-allergen Gardens for Hay Fever Sufferers

Annual Plant Pairing Ideas and Colour Schemes with Annuals
1
, 2

Low-Growing Annuals
1
, 2

Medium-Growing Annuals

Tall-Growing Annuals with White Flowers from 1916

Black or Brown Flowers

Blue to Purple Flowers

Green Flowers with Annuals and Biennials from 1916

Red to Pink Flowers and Cut Flowers
Page
1
, 2, 3

White Flowers
1
, 2

Yellow or Orange Flowers
1
, 2

Dec-orative Foliage

Moist Soil

Shade
1
, 2

House-plants with Yellow Flowers from 1916

Edging Beds

Hanging Baskets

Vining Annuals

 

Bedding for

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Autumn/ Winter Bedding

Bedding for Light Sandy Soil

Bedding for Acid Soil

Bedding for Chalky Soil

Bedding for Clay Soil

Black Flowers

Blue Flowers

Orange Flowers

Pink Flowers

Long Flowering

Coloured Leaves

Attract-ive to Wildlife including Bees, Butterflies and Moths

Purple Flowers

Red Flowers

White Flowers

Yellow Flowers

Multi-Coloured Flowers

Aromatic Foliage or Scented Flowers

Bedding Plant Use

Flowers with 2 Petals

Flowers with 3 Petals

Flowers with
4 Petals

Flowers with 5 Petals

Flowers with 6 Petals

Flowers with more than 6 Petals

Use in Hanging Baskets

Flower Simple Shape

Shape of
Stars

Shape of
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Shape of
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

Shape of
Trumpets and Funnels

Shape of
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

Use in Pots and Troughs

Flower Elabo-rated Shape

Shape of
Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Shape of
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Shape of
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

 

Use in
Screen-ing

Use in
Window Boxes

Shape of
Stand-ards, Wings and Keels

Shape of
Discs and Florets

Shape of
Pin-Cushions and Tufts

Shape of
Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

 

Use in Bedding Out

Use in
Filling In

Biennial for

Cottage and Other Gardens
1
, 2

Cut Flower with Biennials for Rock Work from 1916

Patio Con-tainers with Biennials for Pots in Green-house / Con-servatory

Bene-ficial to Wildlife with Purple and Blue Flowers from 1916

Scent with Biennials for Sunny Banks or Borders from 1916

 

 

Bulb for
--------------
Explan-ation Intro to Bulbs
--------------
725 Blue, White, Yellow, Unusual Colour, or Red-Purple-Pink flowering Bulbs in each month they flower.

Indoor Bulbs for
Dec-ember
January
February

Indoor Bulbs for
March
April
May

Indoor
Bulbs for
June
July
August

Indoor Bulbs for Sep-tember
October
November

Bulbs in Window-boxes
1
, 2

Bulbs in the Border

Bulbs naturalised in Grass

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Dec-Jan
Feb-Mar

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Apr-May
Jun-Aug 1, 2, 3, 4

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Sep-Oct
Nov-Dec

Any Plant Type Blooming in Smallest of Gardens

Bulbs for the Bulb Frame

Bulbs in the Wood-land Garden

Bulbs in the Rock Garden

Bulbs in Green-house or Stove

Achi-menes, Alocasias, Amorpho-phalluses, Aris-aemas, Arums, Begonias, Bomar-eas, Calad-iums

Clivias,
Colo-casias, Crinums, Cyclam-ens, Cyrt-anthuses, Euchar-ises, Urceo-charis, Eurycles

Freesias, Gloxinias, Hae-manthus, Hipp-eastrums

Lachen-alias, Nerines, Lycorises, Pen-cratiums, Hymen-ocallises, Richardias, Sprekelias, Tuberoses, Vallotas, Watsonias, Zephy-ranthes

Bulbs in Bowls

Bulbs in the Alpine House

Hardy Bulbs

Aconitum, Allium, Alstroe-meria, Anemone 1, 1a

Amaryllis, Antheri-cum, Antholy-zas, Apios, Arisaema, Arum, Aspho-deline,

Aspho-delus, Belam-canda, Bloom-eria, Brodiae, Bulbo-codium

Calo-chorti, Cyclo-bothras, Camassia, Col-chicum, Con-vallaria,
Forcing Lily of the Valley, Corydalis, Crinum, Crosmia, Mon-tbretia , Crocus

Cyclamen, Dicentra, Dierama, Eranthis, Eremurus, Ery-thrnium, Eucomis

Fritillaria, Funkia, Gal-anthus, Galtonia, Gladiolus, Hemero-callis

Hya-cinth, Hya-cinths in Pots,
Scilla, Pusch-kinia, Chion-odoxa, Chiono-scilla, Muscari

Iris,
Kniphofia, Lapey-rousia, Leucojum

Lilium,

Lilium in Pots, Malvastrum, Merendera, Milla, Narcissus, Narcissi in Pots

Orni-thogalum, Oxalis, Paeonia, Ran-unculus, Romulea, Sanguin-aria,
Stern-bergia,
Schi-zostylis, Teco-philaea, Trillium

Tulip,
Zephy-ranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs

Acidan-thera, Albuca, Alstroe-meri, Andro-stephium, Bassers, Boussing-aultias, Bravoas, Cypellas, Dahlias, Galaxis,
Geis-sorhizas, Hesper-anthas

Gladioli, Ixias,
Sparaxises, Babianas, Morphixias, Tritonias

Ixio-lirions, Moraeas, Orni-thogal-ums, Oxalises, Phaedra-nassas,
Pan-cratiums, Tigridias, Zephyr-anthes, Cooper-ias

Bulbs for Bedding

Plant each Bedding Plant with a Ground, Edging or Dot Plant for
Spring
1
, 2
or
Summer
1
, 2

Climber 3 sector Vertical Plant System with

Any Plant Type flowers in
Jan,
Feb,
Mar,
Apr,
May 1, 2
Jun,
Jul,
Aug,
Sep,
Oct,
Nov,
Dec
 

----------
Choosing the right Plant

1a.
The Base -
Base of Wall Plants

1b.
Annuals

1c.
Herbs and Vege-tables

1d.
Cut
flowers, Cut Foliage

1e.
Scented flower or foliage

1f.
Foliage use only

 

2a. 1,2,3,4
The Prime - Wall Shrubs

2b.
Fruit trees

3a.
The Higher Reaches -
House-wall Ramblers

3b. 1,2
Non-House-Wall - Climbing Twiners

3c.
Non-House-Wall - Self-clinging Climbers

Raised
Bed
for Wheel-chair Users

Plants for Wildlife-Use as well

Fastest Covering

Least prot-ruding growth when fan-trained

1, 2
Evergreen

Use as
Hedge

Exposed Positions

Use as Ground-cover

1,2
Ornam-ental Fruit

Scented Flowers

1, 2
Autumn Foliage Colour

Winter Bark

Winter and Early Spring Flowers

Summer Colour or Shape of Foliage

Edible Fruit

Needs Conserv-atory or Green-house

Large
Pots and Con-tainers
1
, 2

Cut Flowers

Attractive to Bees

Climber - Simple Flower Shape

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a
Stars

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14k1a1a1a1a1a1a
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

acantholinumcflop99glumaceumfoord1a
Trumpets and Funnels

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming
Salver-form

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14q1a1a1a1a1a
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

 

Climber - Elabo-rated Flower Shape

prunellaflotgrandiflora
Tubes, Lips and Straps

aquilegiacfloformosafoord
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14u1a1a1a1a1a1
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14v1a1a1a1a1a1
Stand-ards, Wings and Keels

brachyscomecflorigidulakevock
Disks and Florets

andosacecforyargongensiskevock
Pin-cushions, Tufts, Petal-less and Cushions

armeriaflomaritimakevock
Umbels, Buttons and Pompoms

 

STAGE 4A 12 BLOOM COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Blue

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Mauve

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Purple

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Brown

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Cream

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Orange

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Pink

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Red

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
White

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 Yellow

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Un-
usual

1
Multi-Colou-red

1
Each Flower Diff-

1
erent Colour

 

STAGE 4B 12 FOLIAGE COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY
Deciduous Shrubs or Trees, Herbaceous Perennials or Bulbs- if that changes from the main colour for instance to a different autumn colour, then it will be in this column and the relevant colour for those months of Win (Winter), Spr (Spring), Sum (Summer) or Aut (Autumn) group as well.
Evergreen Shrubs or Trees, Evergreen Perennials - if that changes from the main colour for instance to a different autumn colour, then it will be in this column and the relevant colour for those months of Win (Winter), Spr (Spring), Sum (Summer) or Aut (Autumn) group as well.

Jan Win

Feb Win

Mar Spr

Apr Spr

May Spr

Jun Sum

Jul Sum

Aug Sum

Sep Aut

Oct Aut

Nov Aut

Dec Win

Decid
Herba

Ever-green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Blue

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Mauve

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Purple

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Black

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Bronze

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Orange

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Pink

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Red

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Grey

1
White

1
Silver

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Yellow

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Un-
usual

1
Varie-gated

1

1

1

1

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677


Site design and content copyright ©September 2017. Top menus revised June 2018. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

Ivydene
Horticultural
Services

Scented Flora of the World by Roy Genders - was first published in 1977 and this paperback edition was published on 1 August 1994 ISBN 0 7090 5440 8:-
This comprehensive book looks at scented flowers and leaves of plants from all over the world. The work has been prepared to the standards of the Index Kewensis, and is filled with the most interesting facts about the scented flora of the world.

I am using the above book from someone who took 30 years to compile it from notes made of his detailed observations of growing plants in preference to
The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover – 16 Oct 2014 by Stephen Lacey (Author), Andrew Lawson (Photographer) ISBN 978-0-7112-3574-8 even though this is the only major reference work on scent and scented plants which is endorsed by the Royal Horticultural Society. See reasons for stopping infilling of this Sense of Fragrance section on 28/07/2016 at end of Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey Page.

Topic
Table has moved to the right hand for this page.
 

 

STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY

 

Cultivation Requirements of Plant

Outdoor / Garden Cultivation

1

Indoor / House Cultivation

1

Cool Greenhouse (and Alpine House) Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter

1

Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year

1

Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

1

 

Sun Aspect

Full Sun

1

Part Shade

1

Full Shade

1

 

Soil Type

Any Soil

1

Chalky Soil

1

Clay Soil

1

Lime-Free Soil

1

Peaty Soil

1

Sandy Soil

1

Acid Soil

1

Alkaline Soil

1

Badly-drained Soil

1

 

Soil Moisture

Dry

1

Moist

1

Wet

1

 

Position for Plant

Back of Shady Border

1

Back of Shrub Border

1

Bedding

1

Bog Garden

1

Coastal Conditions / Seaside

1

Container in Garden

1

Front of Border

1

Ground Cover 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

1

Ground Cover 24-72 inches (60-180 cms)

1

Ground Cover Over 72 inches (180 cms)

1

Hanging Basket

1

Hedge

1

Hedge - Thorny

1

Pollution Barrier

1

Pond

1

Pot in House, Greenhouse, Conservatory or Stovehouse

1

Raised Bed

1

Rest of Border

1

Rock Garden

1

Scree Bed

1

Speciman on Lawn

1

Sunny Border

1

Tree for Lawn

1

Tree/Shrub for Small Garden

1, 2,
3, 4,
5, 6,
7, 8,
9, 10,
11,12,
13,14,
15,16,
uses of tree/ shrub

Wildflower

1

Windbreak

1

Woodland

1

 

Use of Plant

Pollen or nectar for Bees

1

Hosts to Butterflies

1

Encouraging birds / wildlife, providing food and shelter

1

Bee-Pollinated plants for Hay Fever Sufferers

1

Berries / Fruit

1

Dry Site in Full Sun

1

Dry Shade

1

Filtering noise

1

Flower Arrange-ments

Growing Plants for the Church

1



1, 2,
3, 4,
5, 6,
7, 8,
9,10,
11,12,
13,14

Fragrant Flower

1

Language of Flowers

1

Low maintenance

1

Moist Shade

1

Moist and swampy Sites

1

Nitrogen fixing plants

1

Not Fragrant Flower

1

Rabbit-Resistant

1

Speciman Plant

1

Thornless

1

Tolerant of Poor Soil

1

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Plant Foliage

Aromatic Foliage

1

Autumn Foliage

1

Finely Cut Leaves

1

Large Leaves

1

Yellow Variegated Foliage

1

White Variegated Foliage

1

Red / Purple Variegated Foliage

1

Silver, Grey and Glaucous Foliage

1

Sword-shaped Leaves

1

 

 

Flower Shape

Number of Flower Petals

Petal-less
lessershapemeadowrue2a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

1 Petal

1

2 Petals

1

3 Petals
irisflotpseudacorus1a1a1a1a1a1

1

4 Petals
aethionemacfloarmenumfoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

5 Petals
anemonecflo1hybridafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Above 5
anemonecflo1blandafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

 

Flower Shape - Simple

Stars
anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Bowls
 

1

Cups and Saucers
euphorbiacflo1wallichiigarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Globes
paeoniamlokosewitschiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Goblets and Chalices
paeoniaveitchiiwoodwardiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Trumpets
acantholinumcflop99glumaceumfoord1a1

1

Funnels
stachysflotmacrantha1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Bells
digitalismertonensiscflorvroger1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Thimbles
fuchsiaflotcalicehoffman1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Urns
ericacarneacflosspringwoodwhitedeeproot1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Salverform

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

 

Flower Shape - Elaborated

Tubes, Lips and Straps
prunellaflotgrandiflora1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets
aquilegiacfloformosafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Hats, Hoods and Helmets
acanthusspinosuscflocoblands1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Standards, Wings and Keels
lathyrusflotvernus1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Discs and Florets
brachyscomecflorigidulakevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Pin-Cushions
echinaceacflo1purpurealustrehybridsgarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Tufts
centaureacfloatropurpureakavanagh1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Cushion
androsacecforyargongensiskevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Umbel
agapanthuscflos1campanulatusalbidusgarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Buttons
argyranthemumflotcmadeiracrestedyellow1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Pompoms
armeriacflomaritimakevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

 

Natural Arrangements

Bunches, Posies, Sprays
bergeniamorningredcforcoblands1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Columns, Spikes and Spires
ajugacfloreptansatropurpurea1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Whorls, Tiers and Candelabra
lamiumflotorvala2a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Plumes and Tails
astilbepurplelancecflokevock1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Chains and Tassels
 

1

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades
 

1

Spheres, Domes (Clusters), Plates and Drumsticks
androsacecfor1albanakevock1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Shrub, Tree Shape

Columnar
ccolumnarshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Oval
covalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Rounded or Spherical
croundedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Flattened Spherical
cflattenedsphericalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Conical / Narrow Pyramidal
cnarrowconicalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Conical / Broad Pyramidal
cbroadpyramidalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Ovoid /
Egg-Shaped

ceggshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Ovoid
cbroadovoidshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Vase-shaped / Inverted Ovoid
cnarrowvaseshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Fan-Shaped /Vase-Shaped
cfanshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Fan-Shaped / Broad Vase-Shaped
cbroadfanshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Weeping
cnarrowweepingshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Weeping
cbroadweepingshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Palm

1

 

Conifer Cone

1

 

Form

Arching

1

Climbing

1

Clump-Forming

1

Mat-Forming

1

Mound-Forming

1

Prostrate

1

Spreading

1

Stemless

1

Upright

1

 

Poisonous Plant

1

 

STAGE 1
GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY

 

Fragrant Plants adds the use of another of your 5 senses in your garden:-
Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark
1
, 2, 3

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4

Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
1
, 2, 3

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves
1
, 2, 3

Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves
1
, 2

Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5

Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit
1
, 2, 3

Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2

Night-scented Flowering Plants
1
, 2

Scented Aquatic Plants
1


Plants with Scented Fruits
1


Plants with Scented Roots
1
, 2

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood
1


Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums
1


Scented Cacti and Succulents
1


Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell
1
, 2
 

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERY 3

Fan-trained Shape
fantrainedshape2a1a1a

From Rhododendrons, boxwood, azaleas, clematis, novelties, bay trees, hardy plants, evergreens : novelties bulbs, cannas novelties, palms, araucarias, ferns, vines, orchids, flowering shrubs, ornamental grasses and trees book, via Wikimedia Commons

 

Ramblers Scramblers & Twiners by Michael Jefferson-Brown (ISBN 0 - 7153 - 0942 - 0) describes how to choose, plant and nurture over 500 high-performance climbing plants and wall shrubs, so that more can be made of your garden if you think not just laterally on the ground but use the vertical support structures including the house as well.

The Gardener's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Climbers & Wall Shrubs - A Guide to more than 2000 varieties including Roses, Clematis and Fruit Trees by Brian Davis. (ISBN 0-670-82929-3) provides the lists for 'Choosing the right Shrub or Climber' together with Average Height and Spread after 5 years, 10 years and 20 years.

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3


Gardening with Alpines by Stanley B. Whitehead. Garden Book Club.
Published in 1962. It provides most of the data about the Alpines.

Plant Solutions 1000+ suggestions for every garden situation by Nigel Colborn ISBN
13:978
0 00 719312 7, provides many of the plants for the pages in these Galleries.

Essential Annuals The 100 Best for Design and Cultivation. Text by Elizabeth Murray. Photography by Derek Fell. ISBN 0-517-66177-2, provides data about annuals.

Indoor Bulb
Growing by
Edward Pearson
. Published by Purnell & Sons, Ltd in 1953. It provides the data about Indoor Bulbs and Bulbs in
Window-boxes.

Colour All The
Year In My Garden
: A selection of choice varieties - annuals, biennials, perennials, bulbs, climbers and trees and shrubs - that will give a continuity of colour
in the garden throughout the year. Edited by C.H. Middleton. Gardening Book
from Ward, Lock & Co published in 1938, provides plant data for a calendar of plants in bloom throughout the year and for those in the smallest garden.

The Book of Bulbs by S. Arnott, F.R.H.S. Printed by
Turnbull & Spears, Edinburgh in 1901. This provides data about Hardy Bulbs, Half-Hardy Bulbs, Greenhouse and Stove Bulbs.

Collins Guide to
Bulbs by Patrick
M. Synge
. ISBN
0 00 214016-0
First Edition 1961, Second Edition 1971, Reprinted 1973. This provides data on bulbs for bedding, bulbs in the border, bulbs naturalised in grass, bulbs in the woodland garden, bulbs in the rock garden, bulbs in pans in the alpine house, bulbs in the greenhouse, bulbs in bowls and the bulb frame.

Annuals & Biennials, the best annual and biennial plants and their uses in the garden by Gertrude Jekyll published in 1916 and
republished by Forgotten Books in 2012
(Forgotten Books
is a London-based book publisher specializing in the restoration of old books, both fiction and non-fiction. Today we have
372,702 books available to read online, download as ebooks, or
purchase in print.).

Cut Flowers All The Year from The New Illustrated
Gardening Encyclopedia
by Richard Sudell, printed before May 1935 for the plant names in each month, followed by details for culture and propagation.

Mr. Middleton's Garden Book by
Daily Express Publication,
reprinted 1941
for the individual
cultivar names with evergreen/
deciduous, flower colour, flower month and height.

 

Appendix 6 from The Rochford Book of Houseplants by Thomas Rochford and Richard Gorer. Published by Faber and Faber in 1961 with this Second Edition reprinted in 1967.

Temperature Conversion Table
 

F
100
99
98
97
96
95
94
93
92
91
90
89
88
87
86
85
84
83
82
81
80
79
78
77
76
75
74
73
72
71
70
69
68
67
66
65
64
63
62
61
60
59
58
57
56
55
54
53
52
51
50
49
48
47
46
45
44
43
42
41
40
39
38
37
36
35
34
33
32

C
37.8
37.2
36.7
36.1
35.6
35.0
34.4
33.9
33.3
32.8
32.2
31.7
31.1
30.6
30.0
29.4
28.9
28.3
27.8
27.2
26.7
26.1
25.6
25.0
24.4
23.9
23.3
22.8
22.2
21.7
21.1
20.6
20.0
19.4
18.9
18.3
17.8
17.2
16.7
16.1
15.6
15.0
14.4
13.9
13.3
12.8
12.2
11.7
11.1
10.6
10.0
9.4
8.9
8.3
7.8
7.2
6.7
6.1
5.6
5.0
4.4
3.9
3.3
2.8
2.2
1.7
1.1
0.6
0.0

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Tree and Shrubs in Garden Design -

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Clay Soils (neutral to slightly acid)

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Dry Acid Soils

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Shallow Soil over Chalk

Trees and Shrubs tolerant of both extreme Acidity and Alkalinity

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Damp Sites

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Industrial Areas

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Cold Exposed Areas

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Seaside Areas

Shrubs suitable for Heavy Shade

Shrubs and Climbers suitable for NORTH- and EAST-facing Walls

Shrubs suitable for Ground Cover

Trees of Pendulous Habit

Trees and Shrubs of Upright or Fastigiate Habit

Trees and Shrubs with Ornamental Bark or Twigs

Trees and Shrubs with Bold Foliage

Trees and Shrubs for Autumn Colour

Trees and Shrubs with Red or Purple Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Golden or Yellow Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Grey or Silver Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Variegated Foliage

Trees and Shrubs bearing Ornamental Fruit

Trees and Shrubs with Fragrant or Scented Flowers

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Foliage

Flowering Trees and Shrubs for Every Month:-
Jan
, Feb, Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov, Dec

Topic
Plants detailed in this website by
Botanical Name

A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, Q, R, S, T, U,
V, W, X, Y, Z ,
Bulb
A1
, 2, 3, B, C1, 2,
D, E, F, G, Glad,
H, I, J, K, L1, 2,
M, N, O, P, Q, R,
S, T, U, V, W, XYZ ,
Evergreen Perennial
A
, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, Q, R, S, T, U,
V, W, X, Y, Z ,
Herbaceous Perennial
A1
, 2, B, C, D, E, F,
G, H, I, J, K, L, M,
N, O, P1, 2, Q, R,
S, T, U, V, W, XYZ,
Diascia Photo Album,
UK Peony Index

Wildflower
Botanical Names,
Common Names ,

will be
compared in:- Flower colour/month
Evergreen Perennial
,
F
lower shape Wildflower Flower Shape and
Plant use
Evergreen Perennial Flower Shape,
Bee plants for hay-fever sufferers

Bee-Pollinated Index
Butterfly
Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis, Butterfly Usage
of Plants.
Chalk
A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, QR, S, T, UV,
WXYZ
Companion Planting
A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, Q, R , S, T,
U ,V, W, X, Y, Z,
Pest Control using Plants
Fern Fern
1000 Ground Cover A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, Q, R, S, T, U,
V, W, XYZ ,
Rock Garden and Alpine Flowers
A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M,
NO, PQ, R, S, T,
UVWXYZ

Rose Rose Use

These 5 have Page links in rows below
Bulbs from the Infill Galleries (next row), Camera Photos,
Plant Colour Wheel Uses,
Sense of Fragrance, Wild Flower


Case Studies
...Drive Foundations
Ryegrass and turf kills plants within Roadstone and in Topsoil due to it starving and dehydrating them.
CEDAdrive creates stable drive surface and drains rain into your ground, rather than onto the public road.
8 problems caused by building house on clay or with house-wall attached to clay.
Pre-building work on polluted soil.

Companion Planting
to provide a Companion Plant to aid your selected plant or deter its pests

Garden
Construction

with ground drains

Garden Design
...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed
Borders

......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
......Camera photos of Plant supports
Garden
Maintenance

Glossary with a tomato teaching cauliflowers
Home
Library of over 1000 books
Offbeat Glossary with DuLally Bird in its flower clock.

Plants
...in Chalk
(Alkaline) Soil
......A-F1, A-F2,
......A-F3, G-L, M-R,
......M-R Roses, S-Z
...in Heavy
Clay Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...in Lime-Free
(Acid) Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...in Light
Sand Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z.
...Poisonous Plants.
...Extra Plant Pages
with its 6 Plant Selection Levels

Soil
...
Interaction between 2 Quartz Sand Grains to make soil
...
How roots of plants are in control in the soil
...
Without replacing Soil Nutrients, the soil will break up to only clay, sand or silt
...
Subsidence caused by water in Clay
...
Use water ring for trees/shrubs for first 2 years.

Tool Shed with 3 kneeling pads
Useful Data with benefits of Seaweed

Topic -
Plant Photo Galleries
If the plant type below has flowers, then the first gallery will include the flower thumbnail in each month of 1 of 6 colour comparison pages of each plant in its subsidiary galleries, as a low-level Plant Selection Process

Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape

Bulb
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus with its 40 Flower Colours
......European A-E
......European F-M
......European N-Z
......European Non-classified
......American A,
B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M,
N, O, P, Q, R, S,
T, U, V, W, XYZ
......American Non-classified
......Australia - empty
......India
......Lithuania
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
...Each of the above ...Bulb Galleries has its own set of Flower Colour Pages
...Flower Shape
...Bulb Form

...Bulb Use

...Bulb in Soil


Further details on bulbs from the Infill Galleries:-
Hardy Bulbs
...Aconitum
...Allium
...Alstroemeria
...Anemone

...Amaryllis
...Anthericum
...Antholyzas
...Apios
...Arisaema
...Arum
...Asphodeline

...Asphodelus
...Belamcanda
...Bloomeria
...Brodiaea
...Bulbocodium

...Calochorti
...Cyclobothrias
...Camassia
...Colchicum
...Convallaria 
...Forcing Lily of the Valley
...Corydalis
...Crinum
...Crosmia
...Montbretia
...Crocus

...Cyclamen
...Dicentra
...Dierama
...Eranthis
...Eremurus
...Erythrnium
...Eucomis

...Fritillaria
...Funkia
...Galanthus
...Galtonia
...Gladiolus
...Hemerocallis

...Hyacinth
...Hyacinths in Pots
...Scilla
...Puschkinia
...Chionodoxa
...Chionoscilla
...Muscari

...Iris
...Kniphofia
...Lapeyrousia
...Leucojum

...Lilium
...Lilium in Pots
...Malvastrum
...Merendera
...Milla
...Narcissus
...Narcissi in Pots

...Ornithogalum
...Oxalis
...Paeonia
...Ranunculus
...Romulea
...Sanguinaria
...Sternbergia
...Schizostylis
...Tecophilaea
...Trillium

...Tulip
...Zephyranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs
...Acidanthera
...Albuca
...Alstroemeri
...Andro-stephium
...Bassers
...Boussing-aultias
...Bravoas
...Cypellas
...Dahlias
...Galaxis,
...Geissorhizas
...Hesperanthas

...Gladioli
...Ixias
...Sparaxises
...Babianas
...Morphixias
...Tritonias

...Ixiolirions
...Moraeas
...Ornithogalums
...Oxalises
...Phaedra-nassas
...Pancratiums
...Tigridias
...Zephyranthes
...Cooperias

Uses of Bulbs:-
...for Bedding
...in Windowboxes
...in Border
...naturalized in Grass
...in Bulb Frame
...in Woodland Garden
...in Rock Garden
...in Bowls
...in Alpine House
...Bulbs in Green-house or Stove:-
...Achimenes
...Alocasias
...Amorpho-phalluses
...Arisaemas
...Arums
...Begonias
...Bomareas
...Caladiums

...Clivias
...Colocasias
...Crinums
...Cyclamens
...Cyrtanthuses
...Eucharises
...Urceocharis
...Eurycles

...Freesias
...Gloxinias
...Haemanthus
...Hippeastrums

...Lachenalias
...Nerines
...Lycorises
...Pencratiums
...Hymenocallises
...Richardias
...Sprekelias
...Tuberoses
...Vallotas
...Watsonias
...Zephyranthes

...Plant Bedding in
......Spring

......Summer
...Bulb houseplants flowering during:-
......January
......February
......March
......April
......May
......June
......July
......August
......September
......October
......November
......December
...Bulbs and other types of plant flowering during:-
......Dec-Jan
......Feb-Mar
......Apr-May
......Jun-Aug
......Sep-Oct
......Nov-Dec
...Selection of the smaller and choicer plants for the Smallest of Gardens with plant flowering during the same 6 periods as in the previous selection

Climber in
3 Sector Vertical Plant System
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evergreen
...Heather Shrub
...Heather Index
......Andromeda
......Bruckenthalia
......Calluna
......Daboecia
......Erica: Carnea
......Erica: Cinerea
......Erica: Others
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evergreen
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous
Perennial

...P -Herbaceous
...Peony
...Flower Shape
...RHS Wisley
......Mixed Border
......Other Borders
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron

Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use - page links in row 6. Rose, RHS Wisley and Other Roses rose indices on each Rose Use page
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Pruning Methods
Photo Index
R 1, 2, 3
Peter Beales Roses
RV Roger
Roses

Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable
Wild Flower and
Butterfly page links are in next row

Topic -
UK Butterfly:-
...Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly Usage
of Plants.
...Plant Usage by
Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly.

Both native wildflowers and cultivated plants, with these
...Flower Shape,
...
Uses in USA,
...
Uses in UK and
...
Flo Cols / month are used by Butter-flies native in UK


Wild Flower
with its wildflower flower colour page, space,
data page(s).
...Blue Site Map.
Scented Flower, Foliage, Root.
Story of their Common Names.
Use of Plant with Flowers.
Use for Non-Flowering Plants.
Edible Plant Parts.
Flower Legend.
Flowering plants of
Chalk and
Limestone 1
, 2.
Flowering plants of Acid Soil
1.
...Brown Botanical Names.
Food for
Butterfly/Moth.

...Cream Common Names.
Coastal and Dunes.
Sandy Shores and Dunes.
...Green Broad-leaved Woods.
...Mauve Grassland - Acid, Neutral, Chalk.
...Multi-Cols Heaths and Moors.
...Orange Hedge-rows and Verges.
...Pink A-G Lakes, Canals and Rivers.
...Pink H-Z Marshes, Fens, Bogs.
...Purple Old Buildings and Walls.
...Red Pinewoods.
...White A-D
Saltmarshes.
Shingle Beaches, Rocks and Cliff Tops.
...White E-P Other.
...White Q-Z Number of Petals.
...Yellow A-G
Pollinator.
...Yellow H-Z
Poisonous Parts.
...Shrub/Tree River Banks and other Freshwater Margins. and together with cultivated plants in
Colour Wheel.

You know its
name:-
a-h, i-p, q-z,
Botanical Names, or Common Names,
habitat:-
on
Acid Soil,
on
Calcareous
(Chalk) Soil
,
on
Marine Soil,
on
Neutral Soil,
is a
Fern,
is a
Grass,
is a
Rush,
is a
Sedge, or
is
Poisonous.

Each plant in each WILD FLOWER FAMILY PAGE will have a link to:-
1) its created Plant Description Page in its Common Name column, then external sites:-
2) to purchase the plant or seed in its Botanical Name column,
3) to see photos in its Flowering Months column and
4) to read habitat details in its Habitat Column.
Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
Arrow-Grass
Arum
Balsam
Bamboo
Barberry
Bedstraw
Beech
Bellflower
Bindweed
Birch
Birds-Nest
Birthwort
Bogbean
Bog Myrtle
Borage
Box
Broomrape
Buckthorn
Buddleia
Bur-reed
Buttercup
Butterwort
Cornel (Dogwood)
Crowberry
Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
Daffodil
Daisy
Daisy Cudweeds
Daisy Chamomiles
Daisy Thistle
Daisy Catsears Daisy Hawkweeds
Daisy Hawksbeards
Daphne
Diapensia
Dock Bistorts
Dock Sorrels
Clubmoss
Duckweed
Eel-Grass
Elm
Filmy Fern
Horsetail
Polypody
Quillwort
Royal Fern
Figwort - Mulleins
Figwort - Speedwells
Flax
Flowering-Rush
Frog-bit
Fumitory
Gentian
Geranium
Glassworts
Gooseberry
Goosefoot
Grass 1
Grass 2
Grass 3
Grass Soft
Bromes 1

Grass Soft
Bromes 2

Grass Soft
Bromes 3

Hazel
Heath
Hemp
Herb-Paris
Holly
Honeysuckle
Horned-Pondweed
Hornwort
Iris
Ivy
Jacobs Ladder
Lily
Lily Garlic
Lime
Lobelia
Loosestrife
Mallow
Maple
Mares-tail
Marsh Pennywort
Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
Mesem-bryanthemum
Mignonette
Milkwort
Mistletoe
Moschatel
Naiad
Nettle
Nightshade
Oleaster
Olive
Orchid 1
Orchid 2
Orchid 3
Orchid 4
Parnassus-Grass
Peaflower
Peaflower
Clover 1

Peaflower
Clover 2

Peaflower
Clover 3

Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
Pink 1
Pink 2
Pipewort
Pitcher-Plant
Plantain
Pondweed
Poppy
Primrose
Purslane
Rannock Rush
Reedmace
Rockrose
Rose 1
Rose 2
Rose 3
Rose 4
Rush
Rush Woodrushes
Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
Sandalwood
Saxifrage
Seaheath
Sea Lavender
Sedge Rush-like
Sedges Carex 1
Sedges Carex 2
Sedges Carex 3
Sedges Carex 4
Spindle-Tree
Spurge
Stonecrop
Sundew
Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
Teasel
Thyme 1
Thyme 2
Umbellifer 1
Umbellifer 2
Valerian
Verbena
Violet
Water Fern
Waterlily
Water Milfoil
Water Plantain
Water Starwort
Waterwort
Willow
Willow-Herb
Wintergreen
Wood-Sorrel
Yam
Yew


Topic -
The following is a complete hierarchical Plant Selection Process

dependent on the Garden Style chosen
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index


Topic -
Flower/Foliage Colour Wheel Galleries with number of colours as a high-level Plant Selection Process

All Flowers 53 with
...Use of Plant and
Flower Shape
- page links in bottom row

All Foliage 53
instead of redundant
...(All Foliage 212)


All Flowers
per Month 12


Bee instead of wind pollinated plants for hay-fever sufferers
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers
per Month
12
...Index

Rock Garden and Alpine Flowers
Rock Plant Flowers 53
INDEX
A, B, C, D, E, F,
G, H, I, J, K, L,
M, NO, PQ, R, S,
T, UVWXYZ
...Rock Plant Photos

Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours
per Month Index

...All Plants Index


Topic -
Use of Plant in your Plant Selection Process

Plant Colour Wheel Uses
with
1. Perfect general use soil is composed of 8.3% lime, 16.6% humus, 25% clay and 50% sand, and
2. Why you are continually losing the SOIL STRUCTURE so your soil - will revert to clay, chalk, sand or silt.
Uses of Plant and Flower Shape:-
...Foliage Only
...Other than Green Foliage
...Trees in Lawn
...Trees in Small Gardens
...Wildflower Garden
...Attract Bird
...Attract Butterfly
1
, 2
...Climber on House Wall
...Climber not on House Wall
...Climber in Tree
...Rabbit-Resistant
...Woodland
...Pollution Barrier
...Part Shade
...Full Shade
...Single Flower provides Pollen for Bees
1
, 2, 3
...Ground-Cover
<60
cm
60-180cm
>180cm
...Hedge
...Wind-swept
...Covering Banks
...Patio Pot
...Edging Borders
...Back of Border
...Poisonous
...Adjacent to Water
...Bog Garden
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Winter-Flowering
...Fragrant
...Not Fragrant
...Exhibition
...Standard Plant is 'Ball on Stick'
...Upright Branches or Sword-shaped leaves
...Plant to Prevent Entry to Human or Animal
...Coastal Conditions
...Tolerant on North-facing Wall
...Cut Flower
...Potted Veg Outdoors
...Potted Veg Indoors
...Thornless
...Raised Bed Outdoors Veg
...Grow in Alkaline Soil A-F, G-L, M-R,
S-Z
...Grow in Acidic Soil
...Grow in Any Soil
...Grow in Rock Garden
...Grow Bulbs Indoors

Uses of Bedding
...Bedding Out
...Filling In
...Screen-ing
...Pots and Troughs
...Window Boxes
...Hanging Baskets
...Spring Bedding
...Summer Bedding
...Winter Bedding
...Foliage instead of Flower
...Coleus Bedding Photos for use in Public Domain 1

Uses of Bulb
...Other than Only Green Foliage
...Bedding or Mass Planting
...Ground-Cover
...Cut-Flower
...Tolerant of Shade
...In Woodland Areas
...Under-plant
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Covering Banks
...In Water
...Beside Stream or Water Garden
...Coastal Conditions
...Edging Borders
...Back of Border or Back-ground Plant
...Fragrant Flowers
...Not Fragrant Flowers
...Indoor
House-plant

...Grow in a Patio Pot
...Grow in an Alpine Trough
...Grow in an Alpine House
...Grow in Rock Garden
...Speciman Plant
...Into Native Plant Garden
...Naturalize in Grass
...Grow in Hanging Basket
...Grow in Window-box
...Grow in Green-house
...Grow in Scree
...Naturalized Plant Area
...Grow in Cottage Garden
...Attracts Butterflies
...Attracts Bees
...Resistant to Wildlife
...Bulb in Soil:-
......Chalk
......Clay
......Sand
......Lime-Free (Acid)
......Peat

Uses of Rose
...Bedding
...Climber /Pillar
...Cut-Flower
...Exhibition, Speciman
...Ground-Cover
...Grow In A Container
...Hedge
...Climber in Tree
...Woodland
...Edging Borders
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Tolerant of Shade
...Back of Border
...Adjacent to Water
...Page for rose use as ARCH ROSE, PERGOLA ROSE, COASTAL CONDITIONS ROSE, WALL ROSE, STANDARD ROSE, COVERING BANKS or THORNLESS ROSES.
...FRAGRANT ROSES
...NOT FRAGRANT ROSES


Topic -
Camera Photo Galleries showing all 4000 x 3000 pixels of each photo on your screen that you can then click and drag it to your desktop as part of a Plant Selection Process:-

RHS Garden at Wisley

Plant Supports -
When supporting plants in a bed, it is found that not only do those plants grow upwards, but also they expand their roots and footpad sideways each year. Pages
1
, 2, 3, 8, 11,
12, 13,
Plants 4, 7, 10,
Bedding Plants 5,
Plant Supports for Unknown Plants 5
,
Clematis Climbers 6,
the RHS does not appear to either follow it's own pruning advice or advice from The Pruning of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers by George E. Brown.
ISBN 0-571-11084-3 with the plants in Pages 1-7 of this folder. You can see from looking at both these resources as to whether the pruning carried out on the remainder of the plants in Pages 7-15 was correct.

Narcissus (Daffodil) 9,
Phlox Plant Supports 14, 15

Coleus Bedding Foliage Trial - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, Index

National Trust Garden at Sissinghurst Castle
Plant Supports -
Pages for Gallery 1

with Plant Supports
1, 5, 10
Plants
2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9,
11, 12
Recommended Rose Pruning Methods 13
Pages for Gallery 2
with Plant Supports
2
,
Plants 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Dry Garden of
RHS Garden at
Hyde Hall

Plants - Pages
without Plant Supports
Plants 1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Nursery of
Peter Beales Roses
Display Garden

Roses Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Nursery of
RV Roger

Roses - Pages
A1,A2,A3,A4,A5,
A6,A7,A8,A9,A10,
A11,A12,A13,A14,
B15,
B16,B17,B18,B19,
B20,
B21,B22,B23,B24,
B25,
B26,B27,B28,B29,
B30,
C31,C32,C33,C34,
C35,
C36,C37,C38,C39,
C40,
C41,CD2,D43,D44,
D45,
D46,D47,D48,D49,
E50,
E51,E52,F53,F54,
F55,
F56,F57,G58,G59,
H60,
H61,I62,K63,L64,
M65,
M66,N67,P68,P69,
P70,
R71,R72,S73,S74,
T75,
V76,Z77, 78,

Damage by Plants in Chilham Village - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4

Pavements of Funchal, Madeira
Damage to Trees - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13
for trees 1-54,
14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
for trees 55-95,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, 33, 34, 35,
36, 37,
for trees 95-133,
38, 39, 40,
41, 42, 43, 44, 45,
for trees 133-166

Chris Garnons-Williams
Work Done - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Identity of Plants
Label Problems - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11

Ron and Christine Foord - 1036 photos only inserted so far - Garden Flowers - Start Page of each Gallery
AB1 ,AN14,BA27,
CH40,CR52,DR63,
FR74,GE85,HE96,

Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens - 1187
A 1, 2, Photos - 43
B 1, Photos - 13
C 1, Photos - 35
D 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
Photos - 411
with Plants causing damage to buildings in Chilham Village and Damage to Trees in Pavements of Funchal
E 1, Photos - 21
F 1, Photos - 1
G 1, Photos - 5
H 1, Photos - 21
I 1, Photos - 8
J 1, Photos - 1
K 1, Photos - 1
L 1, Photos - 85
with Label Problems
M 1, Photos - 9
N 1, Photos - 12
O 1, Photos - 5
P 1, Photos - 54
Q 1, Photos -
R 1, 2, 3,
Photos - 229
S 1, Photos - 111
T 1, Photos - 13
U 1, Photos - 5
V 1, Photos - 4
W 1, Photos - 100
with Work Done by Chris Garnons-Williams
X 1 Photos -
Y 1, Photos -
Z 1 Photos -
Articles/Items in Ivydene Gardens - 88
Flower Colour, Num of Petals, Shape and
Plant Use of:-
Rock Garden
within linked page


Topic -
Fragrant Plants as a Plant Selection Process for your sense of smell:-

Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an Acid Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
1
, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3
Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves
1
, 2
Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5
Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit
1
, 2, 3
Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2
Night-scented Flowering Plants
1
, 2


Topic -
Website User Guidelines


My Gas Service Engineer found Flow and Return pipes incorrectly positioned on gas boilers and customers had refused to have positioning corrected in 2020.

This table and the following 2 are copied from Ivydene Gardens Case Studies:
Case 4b - Garden Uses Separated Planting Plans.


Case 4a is on the Garden Style Pages
Case 4b is on the Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders Pages
 

 

The flower beds were split up to have their main interest as follows:-

  • The Spring/Summer flowers in the top section of the planting plan below.
  • The Summer/Autumn flowers at the right hand side section of the plan below
  • The Winter flowers to the left side of the middle of the plan below
  • The Spring Flowers at the bottom section of the plan below
  • The Winter Flowers were to the left of the botom left hand side of the plan below, for viewing from the path which came from the front garden to the back door.
  • The Vegetable Garden in the bottom right hand corner of the second plan down

The first set of plants were installed in the Herb Garden, Vegetable Garden and Plants Numbered 1 to 34 in March of one year with all the Lawn. The remaining plants (numbered 32 to 85) were put in a year later.

If you start by seeing what is currently growing, then you may not need to do a soil analysis. Rhododendrons were growing by the house and by the Wooded Area quite successfully with ample flowering each year. That means the soil is acidic and therefore plants for acidic soil should then be chosen.

If you start by using Shrubs/Trees which suit the soil, climate, sun etc as the architectural plants, then fill in with the groundcover plants, then you will eventually produce a low maintenance garden. Some of the groundcover plants will be overgrown by the architectural plants and therefore act as sacrificial plants. It may take 10 years for a shrub to grow 5 feet wide if that is it's eventual width, so you need plants you like the look of rather than weeds to fill that gap.

Proposed Planting Plan for top half of Garden for Case 4

The Ground was rotovated, manure spread and rotovated in before first the architectural and then the ground cover plants were installed and watered in. Spent Mushroom Compost was then laid on top as a 3" mulch.

Item

Num.

Req.

Name

Height x Spread in feet
(12 inches = 1 foot = 30 cms)
" = inch

Foliage

Flower Colour/Month

Comments

32

47

Waldsteinia ternata

4" x 12"

Green

Purple in Autumn

Yellow

/Apr-May

Evergreen Groundcover

Plant as groundcover under Parthenocissus tricuspidata 'Veitchii' between path and fence

33

2

Miscanthus sinensis 'Variegatus'

3 x 3

Green striped cream

...

Grass.

Under Apple and Fir trees.

34

18

7+11

Daphne mezereum

2.5 x 2.5

Green

Purplish-Red

/Feb-Mar

"Mezereon". Scarlet Berries

35

40

29+

11

Dicentra spectabilis 'Alba'

2 x 1

Green

Ivory

/May-Jun

Herbaceous

36

9

Carex hachijoensis 'Evergold'

8" x 8"

Yellow and green banded

...

Evergreen rounded clump.

37

3

Mahonia x 'Charity'

6 x 5

Green

Lemon-Yellow

/Jan-Mar

Evergreen

Fragrant

38

15

Mahonia aquifolium 'Atropurpurea'

2.5 x 4

Green.

Reddish-Purple foliage in Winter-Early Spring

Yellow

/Mar-Apr

Evergreen Groundcover.

"Holly-Leafed Berberis".

39

2

Clematis tangutica

16 x 1

Green

Yellow

/Jul-Sep

Deciduous Climber.

Yellow 'Lanterns' then attractive seed heads suitable for cutting

40

70

Helleborus orientalis

1 x 1

Green

White-Purple

/Feb-April

Evergreen

41

 

Hypericum x moseranum

2 x 3

Green

Golden Yellow

/Jun-Sep

Semi-evergreen Groundcover

41

 

Lamium 'Beacon Silver'

4" x 1

Silvery white

Pink

/Apr-Jun

Groundcover

41

9

Pulmonaria rubra

1 x 1

Light Green

Coral red

/Feb-Apr

Evergreen Groundcover

Plant in 3 groups

41

9

Tiarella cordifolia

8" x 1

Green

Bronze in winter

White

/May-Jun

"Foam Flower"

Evergreen Groundcover.

Plant in 3 groups

42

2

Clematis cirrhosa balearica

22 x 1

Green. Bronze in Winter

Ivory

/Jan-Feb

Evergreen Climber. The Fern-Leafed Clematis

43

3

Kerria japonica 'Pleniflora'

7 x 6

Mid-green

Yellow

/Apr-May

 

44

3

Ruscus aculeatus

32" x 32"

Green

Red berries

/Sep

"Butchers Broom"

Evergreen

45

1

Hamamelis 'Jelena'

6 x 6

Green. Orange and Red Autumn Foliage

Red-Yellow

/Feb-Mar

Deciduous.

"Witch Hazel"

Put at corner.

46

2

Clematis alpina 'Frances Rivis'

10 x 1

Green

Blue

/Apr-May

Deciduous Climber.

Fluffy Seed Heads

47

9

Euphorbia griffithii 'Fireglow'

2 x 1

Leaf Green

Flame Red

/May-Jun

Herbaceous

Plant in 3 clumps

47

9

Hemerocallis 'Golden Chimes'

2 x 1

Green

Yellow

/Jul-Sep

"Day Lily"

48

3

Aucuba japonica 'Variegata'

5 x 4

Green and Yellow speckled

Scarlet berries

/Sep

2 female and 1 male plants.

49

3

Osmanthus decorus

5 x 5

Dark Green

White

/May
followed by purple black berries

Evergreen

50

1

Acer japonicum 'Aureum'

3 x 3

Yellow

---

Deciduous

Put in front of juniper.

51

 

Polygonatum x hybridum

32" x 2

Green

White

/May-Jun

"Solomon's Seal"

51

 

Daffodils

 

 

Yellow

/Mar-Apr

Bulbs

51

 

Hyacinths, Grape Hyacinths

 

 

Blue

/May-Jun

Bulbs

51

 

Tulips

 

 

Red and Yellow

/Jun-Aug

Bulbs

52

2

Ribes alpinum

4 x 4

Green

Orange-Red in autumn

Greenish-Yellow

/Apr-May

Flowering Currant

53

 

Hosta 'Ground Master'

16" x 2

Green with broad creamy white margin

Violet-purple

/Aug-Sep

Groundcover "Plantain Lily"

54

1

Berberis thunbergii 'Harlequin'

5 x 4

Purplish-pink with white speckles

Straw suffused Red

/Apr-May

Put at back

55

1

Lonicera periclymenum 'Graham Thomas'

12 x 3

Green

Cream-Yellow

/Jun-Aug

Honeysuckle Climber.

"Woodbine"

56

3

Berberis x stenophylla

10 x 6

Deep Green

Yellow

/Apr-May

Evergreen.

Scented

57

1

Clematis montana 'Elizabeth'

25 x 1

Grey-Green

Pink

/May-Jun

Deciduous Climber. Almond Scent

58

5

Fragrant Cloud (Bush Rose)

2.5 x 2

Dark Green

Coral-Red

/Jun-Oct

Deciduous

59

60

Geranium endressi 'Wargrave Pink'

18" x 18"

Green

Salmon-pink

/Jun-Sep

Evergreen

"Crane's Bill"

59

 

Alyssum saxatile 'Compactum'

6" x 1

Grey

Yellow

/Apr-Jun

"Gold Dust"

60

4

Gloire de Dijon (Climbing Rose)

6 x 3

Green

Yellow-Orange

/Jun-Oct

Deciduous Climber

61

11

5+6

Pyracantha 'Red Cushion'

2 x 5

Green

White

/Jun

Evergreen.

Mid-Red berries

62

38

29+9

Achillea 'Moonshine'

2 x 1.5

Silver

Sulphur Yellow

/August

Herbaceous

63

27

Salvia superba 'May Night'

18" x 1

Green

Violet blue

/Jun-Aug

Herbaceous

"Sage"

64

71

Kniphofia 'Little Maid'

18" x 1

Green

Yellow

/Jul-Aug

Herbaceous

64

 

Kniphofia galpinii

18" x 1

Green

Orange yellow

/Sep-Oct

"Red Hot Poker"

64

 

Kniphofia

'Fiery Fred'

4 x 1

Green

Orange

/Aug-Sep

"Red Hot Poker"

65

29
18+
11

Delphinium 'King Arthur'

6 x 1

Green

Royal Purple

/Jun-Jul

Herbaceous

66

5

Lavandula stoechas 'Papillon'

1 x 1.5

Grey

Purple

/Jun-Aug

Deciduous

67

1

Clematis 'W.E. Gladstone'

7 x 1

Green

Lavender

/Jun-Sep

Deciduous Climber.

Cuts Well

68

1

Compassion (Climbing Rose)

6 x 3

Dark Glossy Green

Salmon-Orange

/Jun-Oct

Deciduous Climber.

Fragrant and Repeat-Flowering.

69

7

5+2

Ceanothus thyrsiflorus var. repens

3 x 8

Green

Mid-Blue

/May

Evergreen Groundcover.

"Creeping Blue Blossom"

70

72
31+
41

Campanula persicifolia 'Telham Beauty'

3 x 1

Green

China Blue

/June-Aug

Evergreen

71

4

1+3

Hydrangea villosa

7 x 6

Grey-green

Blue

/Aug-Sep

Deciduous

72

 

Helianthemum 'Jubilee'

6" x 1

Green

Yellow

/May-Jul

"Sun Rose"

73

3

Hypericum 'Hidcote'

5 x 4

Dark Green

Yellow

/Jun-Sep

Deciduous.

74

3

Arbutus unedo

8 x 5

Dark Green

White

/Oct-Nov

Evergreen "Strawberry Tree" with ripening orange-red fruit from the previous season

75

3

Aucuba japonica 'Crotonifolia'

5 x 4

Green boldly speckled with Gold

---

Evergreen

Groundcover
2 female and 1 male plants

76

35

Bergenia 'Bressingham White'

1 x 1

Green

White

/May-June

Evergreen

77

45

Tiarella cordifolia

8" x 1

Green
Bronze in Winter

White

/May-Jun

Evergreen Groundcover

78

1

Choisya ternata 'Sundance'

3 x 3

Gold

White

/May

"Mexican Orange Blossom"

79

61

Saxifraga umbrosa

8" x 1

Green

Pink

/May-Jun

Evergreen Groundcover

80

3

Cotoneaster franchetii

9 x 5

Sage Green

White

/Jun

Semi-Evergreen. Orange-Scarlet berries

81

13

Glen Cova

6 x 1

 

 

Raspberry for July

82

13

Malling Jewel

6 x 1

 

 

Raspberry for August

83

13

Autumn Bliss

6 x 1

 

 

Raspberry for Sep-Oct

84

 

Rosa 'Little White Pet'

32" x 2

Green

White

/Jun-Oct

Rose bush

85

3

Rosa 'Korresia'

2 x 2

Green

Yellow

/Jun-Sep

Very fragrant bush rose

Draw circles on your plan for the Architectural plants to represent their eventual width and their proposed position.

Do remember not to have the same height of plant next to each other or they will look like a hedge.

Vary the leaf shape and style to provide interest besides the flower colour, since you will see more of the foliage for a longer period than you will the flower.

Bottom half of Proposed Planting Plan for Case 4

It is worth remembering in your selection of plants to:-

  • have a mixture of evergreen/deciduous as well as herbaceous perennials. This then gives you a changing foliage or lack of it during the winter to provide a changing picture to the garden as well as the possibility of different foliage colour during the winter as to the summer.
  • .
  • If a plant can not only produce a flower, but scent, fruit, and changing foliage colour in the autumn then these are added bonuses if you have a small garden.
  • .
  • A tree can be 2 feet wide and 12 feet high by design from the plant nursery. I have such a holly in my garden from Hilliers' Nursery which was bought for that reason and is that size after 16 years.
  •  

These plant lists can then be used in your maintenance plan by putting an extra 2 columns on the end - one for the pruning required; the other for the month. When all the maintenance data has been put into these tables, then the table can be sorted into month order to provide you with what to maintain at what time.

Item

Number Required

Name

Foliage with Height and Width in feet. ' = feet.

" = inch

Flower

Comments

 

 

North Fence Path and Path through Wood

 

 

Widen to 3' and screed existing with 2" concrete

 

 

New Vegetable Garden Path

 

 

Underlay with Terram 1000 geotextile, 2" thick coarse concrete sand with existing concrete slabs on top

 

 

Storage Shed

 

 

Create 3" concrete base

 

 

Compost Area

 

 

Using 4" Metposts and treated wooden Posts together with 6"x1" treated timber, create 2 covered Compost Bins 4' wide x 6' deep x 6' high.

1

15

Geranium sanguineum var. straitum 'Splendens'

Evergreen. Dark Green.

5"x12" hummock.

Pink.

June-September

RHS Page 316

Geranium sanguineum 'Max Frei' instead

2

40


 

Hypericum calycinum (Rose of Sharon)

and

Evergreen.

Dark Green.

1'x2'
 

Yellow.

June-September

RHS Page 138

use CALYRUST to control rust on Rose of Sharon

2

63

Veronica teucrium 'Crater Lake Blue'

Deciduous.

Green.

1'x1'

Ultramarine Blue.

June-September

Put this near edge of tree

RHS Page 298

Leave existing rose

3

11

Bergenia 'Evening Glow'

Evergreen.

Maroon.

9"x12"

Magenta.

March-April

RHS Page 226

 

Leave existing Bergenias

4

1

Hydrangea quercifolia 'Snow Queen'

Deciduous.

Dark Green with Purple/Red Autumn Foliage.

4'x5'

White.

August-September

Hydrangeas Page 143

Cone shaped flower

5

1

Rhododendron 'Sappho'

Evergreen.

Bright Green.

6'x6'

White.

May

Rhododendron Hybrids Plate 316

6

1

Hydrangea macrophylla 'Altona'

Deciduous.

Mid Green with Brown Autumn Foliage

5'x6'

Dark Blue

July-September

Hydrangeas Page 97

Mophead Flower

7

5

Rhododendron 'Princess Anne'

Evergreen.

Green with Bronze Autumn Foliage.

2'x2'

Yellow

April-May

Rhododendron Hybrids Plate 447

8

7

Rosa 'Harvest Fayre'

Deciduous.

Mid Green

3'x2'6"

Orange-Apricot

June-September

Roses Page 270

9

1

Hydrangea macrophylla 'White Wave'

Deciduous.

mid Green

4'x5'

White

July-September

Hydrangeas Page 82

Lacecap Flower

10

1

Rhododendron luteum

Deciduous.

Mid Green with Red Autumn foliage.

5'x5'

Orange-Yellow

May-June

RHS Page 102

11

25

Alchemilla mollis

and

Perennial

Pale Green.

18"x18"

Greeny-Yellow

June-July

RHS Page 245

Back of bed.

11

30

Aster 'Lady in Blue'

Perennial

Dark Green

10"x6"

Blue

September-October

Front of bed.

12

7

Phormium cookianum 'Cream Delight'

and

Evergreen.

Cream-striped

6'x1'

Yellowish-Green

July-September

RHS Page 538

Back of bed

12

9

Solidago 'Goldenmosa'

and

Perennial.

Yellow

3'x2'

Yellow

August-September

RHS Page 215

Middle of bed

12

15

Iris pallida 'Variegata'

and

Evergreen.

Striped yellow

2'x1'

Mauve

May-June

RHS Page 196

Front of bed

12

25

Cornus canadensis

Deciduous

Bright Green with wine-red Autumn foliage

5"x6"

White.

May-June

RHS Page 314

Groundcover

Keep existing ferns, reduce existing rose and buddlea

13

5

Pyracantha rogersiana 'Flava'

Evergreen.

Bright Green.

10'x2'

White.

Yellow berries.

June

Shrubs Page 262

14

13

Rosa

'Grandpa Dickson'

and

Deciduous.

Mid Green

2'6"x2'

Yellow

June-September

Roses Page 386

14

30

Nepeta nervosa

Evergreen.

Green

6"x14"

Blue/White

June-August

RHS Page 242

15

1

Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple'

Deciduous

Reddish-Purple

6'x5'

Purple

July

RHS Page 89

16

1

Camellia x williamsii 'Inspiration'

Evergreen

Green

15'x8'

Pink

January-April

Camellias Page 47

17

27

Rubus

'Betty Ashburner'

Evergreen

Green

1'x3'

White

Edible raspberry-like fruits

July

Shrubs Page 173

18

2

Pyracantha

'Alexander Pendula'

Evergreen

Green

2'x7'

White

Yellow then Red berries

June

 

19

2

Hydrangea serrata 'Preziosa'

Deciduous

Green with Red/Bronze Autumn foliage

4'x3'

Pink

July-September

Hydrangeas Page 132

20

1

Rhododendron yakushimanum 'Surrey Heath'

Evergreen

Green

3'x4'

Pink

May-June

Rhododendron Hybrids Plate 528

21

2

Rhododendron yakushimanum

'Titian Beauty'

Evergreen

Green

3'x4'

Red

May-June

Rhododendron Hyrbrids Plate 545

22

1

Ben Conan Blackcurrant

 

August-

 

23a

1

Loch Ness Blackberry

and

 

August-September

Tie to East Fence

23b

1

Waldo Blackberry

 

July

Tie to East Fence

24a

1

Whinham's Industry Gooseberry

and

 

Red-Purple Desert fruit

June

Cordon next to North Fence

24b

2

Careless Gooseberry

and

 

Green-White

Culinary fruit

June

Cordon next to North Fence

24c

1

Rovada Red Currant

and

 

August

Cordon next to East Fence

24d

1

White Versailles White Currants

 

July

Bush

25a

1

Strawberry Rhubarb and

Red stalks

April-September

On bank

25b

1

Timperley Early

Rhubarb

 

March-August

On bank

26

9

Euonymous

'Darts Blanket'

Evergreen

Green with Reddish-Purple Autumn foliage.

1'x5'

---

 

27

1

Weigelia 'Variegata'

Deciduous

Creamy-Yellow

5'x4'

Pink

June

 

28

1

Viburnum tinus

'Eve Price'

Evergreen

Green

8'x5'

Pink/White

December-March

RHS Page 117

29

1

Viburnum tinus

'Gwenllian'

Evergreen

Green

9'x5'

Pink

December-March

RHS Page 117

30

21

Hedera 'Hibernica'

Evergreen

Dark Green

1'x15'

Yellowish-Green

October

RHS Page 179

31

5

Eucrphia x nymansensis

Evergreen

Dark Green

10'x3'

White

July-August

RHS Page 54

32

7

Rhododendron

'Vida Brown'

Evergreen

Green

4'x4'

Pink

May

Next to lawn between Hypericum 'Hidcote' and Arbutus unedo

33

2

Parthenocissus tricuspidata 'Veitchii'

Deciduous

Green with Crimson Autumn foliage

22'x20'

---

RHS Page 176

Along fence opposite new storage shed.

34

16

Primula vulgaris

 

 

Primrose

Herb Garden

35

3

Helichrysum angustifolium

 

 

Curry-Plant

Herb Garden

36

16

Chrsanthemum cinerariifolium

 

 

Pyrethrum
Herb Garden

37

1

Monarda didyma 'Croftway Pink'

 

 

Bergamot

Herb Garden

38

2

Senecio cineraria

 

 

Herb Garden

39

30

Galanthus nivalis

 

 

Common Snowdrop

Herb Garden

40

3

Ruta graveolens

 

 

Rue

Herb Garden

41

5

Aster thomsonii 'Nanus'

 

 

Dwarf Michaelmas Daisy

Herb Garden

42

1

Salvia argentea

 

 

Herb Garden

43

15

Dianthus 'Doris'

 

 

Clove Pinks

Herb Garden

44

12

Thymus serpyllum albus

 

 

Thyme

Herb Garden

45

5

Armeria maritima

 

 

Thrift

Herb Garden

46

5

Dianthus caryophyllus

 

 

Clove Pink

Herb Garden

The Raised Herb Garden plant list (plants numbered 34 to 46 in above table and their positions shown in the plan below) aimed to provide fresh herbs throughout the summer/autumn, and flowers to look at as well.

Proposed Herb Garden in Raised Bed for Case 4

 

 

 

Site design and content copyright ©December 2006. Page structure amended October 2012. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

Case Studies Pages
Site Map

Case
1 - Prepare for Sale

2 - Structural Design
.....2a - New Garage
.....2b - Redesign for My Back Garden

 

 

3 - Drive Foundations
.....3a Clay on Sand Subsidence of New House and
...........there are Other Factors causing subsidence. Part
..............of solution is to use
...........Aquadyne Drainage System to transport
..............rainwater within garden area to evergreen
..............plants that can use it.

Pages about soil and why clay causes problems:-
How Soil is created with organic matter and
why Organic Matter is important to Soil?

Soil Formation combines Rock Particles, Humus, Water and Air into Soil Texture with
Soil Structure, which is the interaction between clay domains, organic matter, silt and sand particles. So
How is Clay created? ,
How is Humus made? and
How does Water act in the Soil?

What are the Soil Nutrients besides
the Carbon Cycle and
the Nitrogen Cycle.

What types of organisms are found in the soil? and
how do soil microbes recycle nutrients?

What Pysical changes occur in Soil because of weather? and what Chemical changes occur in Soil because of weather? leading to
how are Chemicals stored and released from Soil? with
how is material lost from the soil?

This leads to an
Action plan for you to do with your soil and

3b Pre-Building Work for Builders to treat polluted soil using phyto-remediation plants.
Perhaps after Builders have read the following section:-

item2a1

Then, they could follow my following Suggested Action Plan for Builders after they have built their houses:-
Lay the
Aquadyne Drainage System
round the perimeter of the new garden areas.
Next to it then plant 1 of these Instant Hedges on the non-house wall sides to absorb the rainwater collected by that drainage system:-

  • Screening Boundary Hedge
  • Stock Boundary Hedge
  • Thorny Barrier Hedge
  • Anti-graffiti Hedge or
  • Security Hedge

And finally on the same day pour a depth of 11 inches (27.5 cms) depth of the builders soil mixture detailed below onto the remainder of the new garden areas and alongside the Instant Hedging.

To provide a different requirement from the current plants used in the above Instant Hedges, plants for each of the following could be used instead:-

  • Thorny Hedge
  • Windbreak
  • Use as Garden Hedge
  • Use in Coastal Conditions
  • Use in Woodland Garden
  • Pollution Barrier

A fortnight later the following type of turf containing RTF (Rhizomatous Tall Fescue), bred by Barenbrug Research USA, could be laid over the proposed lawn areas.

The roots of that grass will reach the clay below and stabilise the new builders soil mix, before the proposed owners view the property a month later.

The builders soil mix should within 3 months become roughly the same proportion of clay, silt and sand which is within a Sandy Clay Loam to create a sweet spot for growing plants as shown on How is material lost from the soil? Page, since it will mix with the clay below.

 



4a - Garden Uses
......4b - Garden Plant Plan

5 - Wildlife Garden

6 - Vegetable Garden

7 - Repair of Concrete Pond

8 - Creation of Pond

 

Design Cases

When designing a garden, it is vital to know who and for how long the resulting designed and landscaped garden is going to be maintained by. The book 'The One Hour Garden' describes what maintenance work can be done in the time that you have allotted; and therefore what besides a lawn, you can have in your garden. My redesign and construction work to be done on my 3 gardens - as shown by Case 2 - must be to reduce the maintenance time required to the time I have available. If the gardens are first weeded, pruned, mulched, mown and bare earth converted to lawns using grass seed, then construction can take place in the future - as free time allows during a week or fortnight after the maintenance has been done.

In Case 4, the combination of the Structural and Planting Designs would create a garden that I would be able to maintain in one day a fortnight. I would install a 3" deep mulch in the spring on the beds, so that I can prune the shrubs/trees and hoe the odd weed; whilst the father mows the lawns, the mother tends the vegetable garden and their teenage daughters play football!!

The children in Case 5 loved to look at creepy-crawlies and wildlife, so that together with low-cost the design for different areas in a terrace house garden was created.

 

Construction Cases

Case 3 is building a drive on clay and it is important to get the part you will not see - the foundations - done correctly.

Case 8 is creating a pond with its pitfalls for foundations.

 

Maintenance Cases

If you are asking someone to maintain your garden, then do provide the complete picture. If as in Case 1, you intend to sell the property, then look at this - as not a maintenance but as a selling job - and get that job done instead.

Case 6 is creating a vegetable garden in a back garden during the maintenance program of one day a fortnight to maintain it and the remainder of the back and front gardens. This was done over 7 years using a crop rotation system

Concrete ponds are likely to crack open due to movement in the ground levels due to being in clay or vibration caused by road traffic if it is fairly close. Case 7 shows no planting shelves for the pond plants.

 

 

 

 

Section below on Problems for Houseowners and Builders when the new home is surrounded by clay and how to solve them.

 

 

 

Problems for Houseowners and Builders when the new home is surrounded clay and how to solve them.

8 problems caused by clay:-

  • In creating a new driveway for a client you can see (from the top photos) that when it rains, that the indentations in the clay caused by my boots do fill with water and then that water does not drain away.
    Solution -
    Had I installed a soakaway under the drive or elsewhere in the back garden below the drive, then it would have filled with water and not drained.
    If the ground is clay, then that soakaway will fill and never empty. In that case if you create that soakaway as a continuous one about 2 feet away from the boundary with it starting 3 feet from house and continuing round to meet the entrance of the drive, then planting privet or yew evergreen hedge in that 2 feet gap between it and the boundary will absorb the water from that driveway. The 2 feet depth of existing clay soil between that extended soakaway and the boundary should be replaced by the following mixture of 1 part existing soil and 1 part sand to provide a soil where the soakaway water can move from the soakaway through the soil to the hedge roots. The french drain used to transport the water should be surrounded by 4 inches of coarse pea-shingle inside an envelope of geotextile to stop that pea-shingle from mixing with the mixed soil.
  • The same happened to a client's house, which subsided after 6 years from being built. The builder had run out of top soil and instead of putting sand as the rest of the back garden was composed of where it had been growing a forest, they put 24 inches (60 cms) of blue clay the full width of the back of the house which sloped up and met the upward sloping lawn laid by the builders. The lawn prevented much of the rainwater from entering the sand underneath and thus draining away and ended up on the 144 inch (360 cms) wide slabbed patio before hitting the house wall and soaking into the blue clay below the slabs. Clay can absorb 40% of its own volume before it turns from a solid to a liquid. When the clay absorbs the water, then the suction on the housewall is sufficient to raise that wall. When it dries out then the wall subsides and so it subsided. The 6th photo down the Case 3a Clay on Sand Subsidence of New House Page shows the blue clay as the dark section at the top of the trench with the sand being dark yellow below it.
    Solution 1 -
    Instead of the patio sloping up the back garden, I installed a concrete foundation for a conservatory with the concrete going 12 inches (30 cms) deeper than the 24 depth of blue clay. Then, t
    he foundation for the new Path/Patio at the back of the house was sloped away from the house at 1:40 and the rain drained to the Gully, thence to the Sump in the middle of the garden. I then bought a powerful Cultivator Tiller and rotovated the back lawn. Using an asphalt rake and a spade with wheelbarrow; I then levelled the remaining back garden lawn in both directions, with the conservatory/path areas sloping away from the house to allow rainwater to be collected and taken to the sump, instead of causing further damage to the house. The levelled lawn then needed a Patio wall to stop the earth from being unsurported. A builder than built the conservatory, the restraining patio wall and the new path/patio.
    Solution 2 -
    If that area of blue clay had been surrounded by the
    Aquadyne Drainage System (details at bottom of this page) by the original builders to a 36 inches depth, then the problem would never have arisen as all the rainwater would have been transferred to the surrounding sand soil and the underlying sand. Thus the suction power of the clay would have been on the Aquadyne Drainage System and not the house wall. Since the Aquadyne Drainage System is plastic it would if it moved up and down and not taken the house wall with it.
  • There are other factors causing Subsidence of Buildings, especially Tree Roots in Clay Soils.
  • I spent some months maintaining the grounds within 5 acres of a new Care Home. The previous use for these 5 acres had been as a boys school. This had been demolished and the rubble then built on for the 5 new residential Care Buildings with its Administration/Kitchen Building. 5000 shrubs and trees were planted and at the end of the first year, I audited what remained - 2000 out those 5000 had died. The builders had generously added a 2 inches (5 cm) depth of topsoil before planting into that and the rubble under it.
    Solution -
    I bought an American Super Tomahawk Chipper/Shredder and shredded the tree/shrub prunings during the winter and applied the shreddings as a mulch in the further beds on the 5 acre estate during the winter to provide nutrients for the surviving plant.
    I did suggest putting a 4 inch mulch of bark on top of the ground in the beds at a trifling cost of £19,000, since digging up the plants and transfering them to a nursery bed, before excaving a further 12 inches (30 cm) and replacing the 14 inch (35 cm) depth with good soil mixed with manure; and then its plants; would have been extremely time consuming and expensive. This money was not forthcoming, so when I started cutting the lawns, I added the mowings to the beds as a mulch. I was told that this was unsightly and to stop doing that - at this point I resigned since the contract for the original planting only included making up the losses in the first year, I could not see that many of the plants would survive in the succeeding years.
    You need a minimum of a spade depth of at least 8 inches (20 cms) of topsoil with a 4 inch mulch of bark or spent mushroom compost surrounding each plant after the planting, plus an irrigation system - that means 12 inches below the top of the bed edging, so that the mulch does not flow out onto the lawn, patio, drive or paths after it has been laid.
  • In maintaining a client's lawn, I found that after rain that their lawn was squelchy. The lawn was laid on a clay topsoil.
    Solution-
    I mowed the lawn quite low and applied
    Top Dressing at the recommended rate. I repeated this twice more once a month. After that, the problem was sorted.
  • I received this from a client - An unsuccessful planting scheme had left bare areas of garden as plants failed to survive winter in the waterlogged clay soil. The loss of numerous plants and the cost of replacing them had left us disheartened.
    Solution -
    A 150mm (6 inch) deep mulch of mixed peat, sharp washed sand and horticultural grit was applied on top of a heavy clay soil to improve its structure, and stop the plants therein from drowning, at £10 a square metre. The mix was:
    • 4 cubic metres of Peat (to provide the Organic Polymers/Organic Matter and Carbon.)
    • 2 cubic metres of Sharp Washed Sand (to provide the sand for the production of microaggregates)
    • 2 cubic metres of Horticultural Grit (to provide larger particles for aggregation)
    • 25kg of Garden Lime (to provide Calcium for the plants and allow clay minerals to bond together to form domains. Once clay minerals are stacked together to form domains, they can then bond with organic matter to form microaggregates)
    • 25 kg of Sulphate of Iron (to provide Iron to act as a trace element and to create soil colloid for buffering chemical nutrients in the soil for later use by plants)
    • 25Kg of Sulphate of Potash ( to provide fertilizer for the plants)

      and the following was sent to me in October 2004:- An unsuccessful planting scheme had left bare areas of garden as plants failed to survive winter in the waterlogged clay soil. The loss of numerous plants and the cost of replacing them had left us disheartened. It was evident that remedial action was needed in the form of a mixture of gravel, sand and peat to create an organic loam. Approximately six inches was added in April and left to settle and do its job. By July there was a noticeable difference in the quality of the soil and the plants. Shrubs with sparse, mottled leaves were looking glossy and robust, overall growth had increased (including the weeds!) and the soil was holding its moisture well. But the biggest difference came in the confidence it gave us to transform the garden. The borders used to be a no-go area between May and September as the clay baked and cracked, but the new soil was easy to handle and weeds could be successfully removed. We realised that there are no quick fixes - the key to a healthy garden is rich, nutritous soil. Once our plants began to thrive we were optimistic that, with good advice, we could create a garden to be proud of.
  • I visited a prospective client whose second laid lawn sloping up from the house in the back garden was needed to be replaced. The turves had dried and the clay soil had also dried with the result that the turves separated. She had had the builder lay a horizontal patio at the back of her new house and the lawn went from there up to the next house. Her home and garden were on clay. I did point out to her that when it rained, then the patio would become a lake and her house would subside, since not only the rain falling on the patio but the rain falling on the lawn would also end up at the patio. I refused to quote for her lawn replacement.
    Solution -
    in next row.
  • When requested by a builder, I visited his site where huge excavators were used to dig the trenches for the drains and utilities. The garden at the back of the showhouse had a downward slope from the garden wall to the house and moss was already growing round the french windows facing the back garden.
    Solution -
    in next Row.

     

 

Builders do sell the original topsoil including

  • the grass,
  • the zone of organic matter and the
  • zone where mineral and organic matter are mixed

where the new building and its garden areas are to be built.

soil11casestudies

The consolidated parent material (bedrock) is usually sand, chalk or clay with flint possibly. At the end of building; the builders rubble is covered with possibly only a 2 inch (5 cms) depth of imported topsoil, which might be the washings from the sugar beet in the sugar industry. This is covered with turf and the unsuspecting public is offered the result. As likely as not one of their gardens slopes towards the house and even with the modern depth of foundation wall, there is no guarantee that subsidence will not occur.

 

If every garden of a new house had a 12 inch depth of soil removed from its new garden area, then at the end of the building work, the Aquadyne Drainage System would be laid round the entire boundary. Next to it then plant the relevant Instant Hedge on the non-house wall sides to absorb the rainwater collected by that drainage system

soil15casestudies

The mix to change clay soil into a friable useful soil in less than 4 months for the above domestic garden problem was in royal blue colour typing. Using the burgundy colour typing components, the builder could create the following soil mix for his gardens:

  • 4 cubic metres of Peat (to provide the Organic Polymers/Organic Matter and Carbon.)
  • 2 cubic metres of Sharp Washed Sand (to provide the sand for the production of microaggregates).
  • 2 cubic metres of Horticultural Grit (to provide larger particles for aggregation)
    752,000 tons of glass are now recycled annually in the UK. Crushed glass (cullet) is used in Agriculture and landscape applications, such as top dressing, root zone material or golf bunker sand, so builders could replace the Sharp washed Sand and the Horticultural Grit with cullet.
  • 25kg of Garden Lime (to provide Calcium for the plants and allow clay minerals to bond together to form domains. Once clay minerals are stacked together to form domains, they can then bond with organic matter to form microaggregates).
    Poultry litter -
    Uric acid and organic nitrogen (N) in the bird excreta and spilled feed are converted to ammonium (NH4+) by the microbes in the litter. Ammonium, a plant-available N form, can bind to litter and also dissolve in water. Ammonium is a highly reactive ion that bonds with sulfates, nitrates and phosphates to form ammonium salts that improve the nutrient value of litter when land applied as fertilizer.
    Plasterboard (is gypsum - Calcium sulfate dihydrate normally pressed between a paper facer and backer)
    wastage in the UK is estimated to be 300,0000 tonnes per year
    . Builders could replace the Garden Lime with the reaction of the poultry litter on the gypsum.
    The recommendations stated in the RHS article are for the finely ground garden lime (calcium carbonate) sold in garden centres in kilograms (kg) per square metre or ounces per square yard. They are based on the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) recommendations for incorporation into the top 20cm (8in) of soil and are enough to raise the soil pH to pH6.5. This is considered the best all-round pH for the majority of garden plants.
  • 25 kg of Sulphate of Iron (to provide Iron to act as a trace element and to create soil colloid for buffering chemical nutrients in the soil for later use by plants)
  • 25Kg of Sulphate of Potash ( to provide fertilizer for the plants)

If water with 150 kgs of clay was first added to the Concrete TruckMixer and then the required volume of cullet followed by the required volume of waste plasterboard, the mixture is then mixed for an hour. If the cullet/waste plasterboard mixture is passed through the poultry houses to mix with the poultry litter on the litter floor before being collected into the next Concrete TruckMixer, then the houses would be cleaner and smell less. The required volume of waste from beer making could replace the Peat above and the requisite Sulphate of Iron and Sulphate of Potash could be added to the Concrete TruckMixer before that mixture from the Poultry Farm litter floor is added.

That soil mixture could then be mixed for 30 minutes before applying it to the garden areas of the new houses built by the builder to an 11 inch (27.5 cms) depth. The resulting mixture would then integrate with the clay and create a deep topsoil within 3 months.

All the requirements for a soil as shown in the figure above would then have mixed together and time will increase the bacteria and get a new soil structure created.

The following type of turf could then be laid over the proposed lawn areas a fortnight later:-

RTF (Rhizomatous Tall Fescue), bred by Barenbrug Research USA, produces rhizomes (an underground stem) that send a shoot up to the soil surface while extending new roots downwards. In fact, RTF can root to 1.5 metres deep giving it a chance to tap into water reserves that normal lawn turf cannot reach.
Because RTF is suited to almost all soil types and needs little maintenance and minimal irrigation, gardeners will be rewarded with beautiful lawns, rich in colour and disease resistant, not only in the summer but all year round. During the winter months, the lawn will hold its lush green colour and can resist frost and darker corners. With the onset of spring the rapid germination and quick spring green-up means that lawns are greener earlier.

 

 

 

Section below on Plant Selection Methods

 

 

Choose 1 of these different Plant selection Methods:-

 

1. Choose a plant from 1 of 53 flower colours in the Colour Wheel Gallery.

 

2. Choose a plant from 1 of 12 flower colours in each month of the year from 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery.

 

3. Choose a plant from 1 of 6 flower colours per month for each type of plant:-

Aquatic
Bedding
Bulb
Climber
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Wild Flower

 

4. Choose a plant from its Flower Shape:-

Shape, Form
Index

Flower Shape

 

5. Choose a plant from its foliage:-

Bamboo
Conifer
Fern
Grass
Vegetable

 

6. There are 6 Plant Selection Levels including Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers in
Plants Topic.

 

or

 

7. when I do not have my own or ones from mail-order nursery photos , then from March 2016, if you want to start from the uppermost design levels through to your choice of cultivated and wildflower plants to change your Plant Selection Process then use the following galleries:-

  • Create and input all plants known by Amateur Gardening inserted into their Sanders' Encyclopaedia from their edition published in 1960 (originally published by them in 1895) into these
    • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery,
      then
    • Stage 2 - Infill Plants Index Gallery being the only gallery from these 7 with photos (from Wikimedia Commons) ,
      then
    • Stage 3 - All Plants Index Gallery with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2
    • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery,
    • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery with
    • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery and
    • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery
    • Unfortunately, if you want to have 100's of choices on selection of plants from 1000's of 1200 pixels wide by up to 16,300 pixels in length webpages, which you can jump to from almost any of the pages in these 7 galleries above, you have to put up with those links to those choices being on
      • the left topic menu table,
      • the header of the middle data table and on
      • the page/index menu table on the right of every page of those galleries.

There are other pages on Plants which bloom in each month of the year in this website:-

 

 

PLANTS PAGE
MENU
Introduction
Site Map
 

PLANT USE
Plant Selection
Level 1
Attracts Bird/Butterfly
Photos - Butterfly

Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers
Photos - Bloom per Month

Groundcover Height
0-24 inches
(0-60 cms
)
24-72 inches
(60-180 cms
)
Above 72 inches
(180 cms
)
 

Poisonous Cultivated and UK Wildflower Plants with Photos
or
Cultivated Poisonous Plants
or
Wildflower Poisonous Plants


Rabbit-Resistant Plant
Flower Arranging
Wildflower
Photos - Wildflowers

 


PLANTS FOR SOIL
Plant Selection
Level 2
Info - Any Soil
Plants - Any Soil A-F
Plants - Any Soil G-L
Plants - Any Soil M-R
Plants - Any Soil S-Z

Info - Chalky Soil
Plants - Chalk Soil A-F
Plants - Chalk Soil G-L
Plants - Chalk Soil M-R
Plants - Chalk Soil S-Z

Info - Clay Soil
Plants - Clay Soil A-F
Plants - Clay Soil G-L
Plants - Clay Soil M-R
Plants - Clay Soil S-Z

Info - Lime-Free Soil
Plants - Lime-Free Soil A-F
Plants - Lime-Free Soil G-L
Plants - Lime-Free Soil M-R
Plants - Lime-Free Soil S-Z

Info - Sandy Soil
Plants - Sand Soil A-F
Plants - Sand Soil G-L
Plants - Sand Soil M-R
Plants - Sand Soil S-Z

Info - Peaty Soils
Plants - Peaty Soil A-F
Plants - Peaty Soil G-L
Plants - Peaty Soil M-R
Plants - Peaty Soil S-Z

Following parts of Level 2a,
Level 2b,
Level 2c and
Level 2d are included in separate columns
together with
Acid Soil,
Alkaline Soil,
Any Soil
,
Height and Spread,
Flowering Months and
Flower Colour in their Columns,
and also
Companion Plants to aid this plant Page,
Alpine Plant for Rock Garden Index Page
Native to UK WildFlower Plant in its Family Page in this website

and/or
Level 2cc
in the Comment Column
within each
of the Soil Type Pages of
Level 2

PLANTS PAGE MENU

 


Plant Selection by Plant Requirements
Level 2a
Sun aspect, Moisture


Plant Selection by Form
Level 2b
Tree Growth Shape
Shrub/Perennial Growth Habit


Plant Selection by Garden Use
Level 2c
Bedding
Photos - Bedding
Bog Garden
Coastal Conditions
Containers in Garden
Front of Border
Hanging Basket
Hedge
Photos - Hedging
Pollution Barrier
Rest of Border
Rock Garden
Photos - Rock Garden
Thorny Hedge
Windbreak
Woodland


Plant Selection by Garden Use
Level 2cc Others
Aquatic
Back of Shady Border
Crevice Garden
Desert Garden
Raised Bed
Scree Bed
Specimen Plant
Trees for Lawns
Trees for Small Garden
Wildflower
Photos - Wildflowers


Plant Selection by Plant Type
Level 2d
Alpine
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Herbac Per
Photos - RHS Herbac
Photos - Rock Garden
Annual
Bamboo
Photos - Bamboo
Biennial
Bulb
Photos - Bulb
Climber
Photos - Climber
Conifer
Deciduous Rhizome
Deciduous Shrub
Photos - Decid Shrub
Evergreen Perennial
Photos - Evergr Per
Evergreen Shrub
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Fern
Photos - Fern
Fruit Plant
Grass
Herb
Herbaceous Perennial
Photos - Herbac Per
Remaining Top Fruit
Soft Fruit
Sub-Shrub
Top Fruit
Tuber
Vegetable
Photos - Vegetable

PLANTS PAGE MENU

 


REFINING SELECTION
Plant Selection by
Flower Colour
Level 3a
Blue Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Wild Flower

Orange Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Wild Flower

Other Colour Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Wild Flower

Red Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Decid Shrub
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Herbac Per
Photos - Rose
Photos - Wild Flower

White Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Decid Shrub
Photos - Decid Tree
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Herbac Per
Photos - Rose
Photos - Wild Flower

Yellow Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Decid Shrub
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Herbac Per
Photos - Rose
Photos - Wild Flower


Photos - 53 Colours in its Colour Wheel Gallery

Photos - 12 Flower Colours per Month in its Bloom Colour Wheel Gallery


Plant Selection by Flower Shape
Level 3b
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Herbac Per


Plant Selection by Foliage Colour
Level 3c
Aromatic Foliage
Finely Cut Leaves
Large Leaves
Other
Non-Green Foliage 1
Non-Green Foliage 2
Sword-shaped Leaves

 


PRUNING
Plant Selection by Pruning Requirements
Level 4
Pruning Plants

 


GROUNDCOVER PLANT DETAIL
Plant Selection Level 5
Plant Name - A
Plant Name - B
Plant Name - C
Plant Name - D
Plant Name - E
Plant Name - F
Plant Name - G
Plant Name - H
Plant Name - I
Plant Name - J
Plant Name - K
Plant Name - L
Plant Name - M
Plant Name - N
Plant Name - O
Plant Name - P
Plant Name - Q
Plant Name - R
Plant Name - S
Plant Name - T
Plant Name - U
Plant Name - V
Plant Name - W
Plant Name - XYZ

 


Then, finally use
COMPANION PLANTING to
aid your plant selected or to
deter Pests
Plant Selection Level 6

 

To locate mail-order nursery for plants from the UK in this gallery try using search in RHS Find a Plant.

To locate plants in the European Union (EU) try using Search Term in Gardens4You and Meilland Richardier in France.

To locate mail-order nursery for plants from America in this gallery try using search in Plant Lust.

To locate plant information in Australia try using Plant Finder in Gardening Australia.

 

Section below provides details about flowers

 

 

 

The following details come from Cactus Art:-

"A flower is the the complex sexual reproductive structure of Angiosperms, typically consisting of an axis bearing perianth parts, androecium (male) and gynoecium (female).    

Bisexual flower show four distinctive parts arranged in rings inside each other which are technically modified leaves: Sepal, petal, stamen & pistil. This flower is referred to as complete (with all four parts) and perfect (with "male" stamens and "female" pistil). The ovary ripens into a fruit and the ovules inside develop into seeds.

Incomplete flowers are lacking one or more of the four main parts. Imperfect (unisexual) flowers contain a pistil or stamens, but not both. The colourful parts of a flower and its scent attract pollinators and guide them to the nectary, usually at the base of the flower tube.

partsofaflowersmallest1

 

Androecium (male Parts or stamens)
It is made up of the filament and anther, it is the pollen producing part of the plant.
Anther This is the part of the stamen that produces and contains pollen. 
Filament This is the fine hair-like stalk that the anther sits on top of.
Pollen This is the dust-like male reproductive cell of flowering plants.

Gynoecium (female Parts or carpels or pistil)
 It is made up of the stigma, style, and ovary. Each pistil is constructed of one to many rolled leaflike structures. Stigma This is the part of the pistil  which receives the pollen grains and on which they germinate. 
Style This is the long stalk that the stigma sits on top of. 
Ovary The part of the plant that contains the ovules. 
Ovule The part of the ovary that becomes the seeds. 

Petal 
The colorful, often bright part of the flower (corolla). 
Sepal 
The parts that look like little green leaves that cover the outside of a flower bud (calix). 
(Undifferentiated "Perianth segment" that are not clearly differentiated into sepals and petals, take the names of tepals.)"

 

 

 

The following details come from Nectary Genomics:-

"NECTAR. Many flowering plants attract potential pollinators by offering a reward of floral nectar. The primary solutes found in most nectars are varying ratios of sucrose, glucose and fructose, which can range from as little a 8% (w/w) in some species to as high as 80% in others. This abundance of simple sugars has resulted in the general perception that nectar consists of little more than sugar-water; however, numerous studies indicate that it is actually a complex mixture of components. Additional compounds found in a variety of nectars include other sugars, all 20 standard amino acids, phenolics, alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenes, vitamins, organic acids, oils, free fatty acids, metal ions and proteins.

NECTARIES. An organ known as the floral nectary is responsible for producing the complex mixture of compounds found in nectar. Nectaries can occur in different areas of flowers, and often take on diverse forms in different species, even to the point of being used for taxonomic purposes. Nectaries undergo remarkable morphological and metabolic changes during the course of floral development. For example, it is known that pre-secretory nectaries in a number of species accumulate large amounts of starch, which is followed by a rapid degradation of amyloplast granules just prior to anthesis and nectar secretion. These sugars presumably serve as a source of nectar carbohydrate.

WHY STUDY NECTAR? Nearly one-third of all worldwide crops are dependent on animals to achieve efficient pollination. In addition, U.S. pollinator-dependent crops have been estimated to have an annual value of up to $15 billion. Many crop species are largely self-incompatible (not self-fertile) and almost entirely on animal pollinators to achieve full fecundity; poor pollinator visitation has been reported to reduce yields of certain species by up to 50%."

 

The following details about DOUBLE FLOWERS comes from Wikipedia:-

"Double-flowered" describes varieties of flowers with extra petals, often containing flowers within flowers. The double-flowered trait is often noted alongside the scientific name with the abbreviation fl. pl. (flore pleno, a Latin ablative form meaning "with full flower"). The first abnormality to be documented in flowers, double flowers are popular varieties of many commercial flower types, including roses, camellias and carnations. In some double-flowered varieties all of the reproductive organs are converted to petals — as a result, they are sexually sterile and must be propagated through cuttings. Many double-flowered plants have little wildlife value as access to the nectaries is typically blocked by the mutation.

 

There is further photographic, diagramatic and text about Double Flowers from an education department - dept.ca.uky.edu - in the University of Kentucky in America.

 

"Meet the plant hunter obsessed with double-flowering blooms" - an article from The Telegraph.

 

 

 

 

SOIL PAGE MENU

Soil Introduction -
Organic Matter
in Soil
Physical Changes in Soil
Chemical Changes in Soil
How Soil is created
How Clay is created
How is Humus made
How is Soil Material Lost
What is Soil Texture

WHAT IS SOIL STRUCTURE

How does Water act in Soil
How Chemicals stored in Soil
What are Soil Nutrients
What Soil Organisms
How microbes use nutrients

THE CARBON CYCLE

The Nitrogen Cycle

ACTION PLAN FOR YOU

SOIL SUBSIDENCE
Subsidence due to Clay
Case 1 Clay on Sand

 

Soil Site Map

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines


7 Flower Colours per Month in Colour Wheel below in BULB, CORM, RHIZOME and TUBER GALLERY.

Click on Black or White box in Colour of Month.

LATE SUMMER GALLERY PAGES
Site Map of pages with content (o)
Introduction

FLOWER COLOUR
(o)Bicolour
(o)Blue
(o)Green
(o)Orange
(o)Pink
(o)Purple
(o)Red
(o)Unusual Colours
(o)White
(o)Yellow

FOLIAGE COLOUR
(o)Green 1
(o)Green 2
(o)Green 3
Other Colour

FORM
Mat-forming
Prostrate
Mound-forming
Spreading
(o)Clump-forming
(o)Stemless
(o)Upright

BULB, CORM, RHIZOME AND TUBER INDEX - There are over 700 bulbs in the bulb galleries. The respective flower thumbnail, months of flowering, height and width, foliage thumbnail,
form thumbnail, use and
comments are in the rel-evant index page below:-
(o): A 1, 2, 3
(o): B
(o): C 1, 2
(o): D
(o): E
(o): F
(o): G, Gladiolus
(o): H
(o): I
....: J
....: K
(o): L 1, 2
(o): M
(o): N
(o): O
(o): P
....: Q
....: R
(o): S
(o): T
....: U
(o): V
....: W
(o): XYZ
Type of Form (Mat, Cushion, Spreading, Clump, Stemless, Upright),
Soil Type, Sun Aspect,
Soil Moisture, Foliage Colour, Uses
added, starting in March 2020 with Bulb Allium Anemone Gallery

 

 

colormonthbulb9a1a1a1

Besides the above Bulb Flower Colour Comparison Pages, you also have the following Comparison Pages:-
...Bulb Flower Shape -
7 pages of Number of Petals ...... 5 petals,
23 pages of Flower Shape ......... Stars and
7 pages of Natural Arrangements Drumstick

...Bulb Form
-
7 pages of Bulb Form ...Clump-forming
...Bulb Use
-
33 pages of Bulb Use ...Mass Planting,
Groundcover,
Grow in Patio Pot and
Use in Coastal Conditions
...Bulb Preferred Soil

5 pages of Soil preferred by Bulb ...Chalk ------ in the table on the right

 

Late Summer INDEX link to Bulb Description Page

Flower Colour with Flower Thumbnail

Flowering Months

Mat,
Cushion,
Spreading,
Clump,
Stemless,
Upright
as its form

Height x Width in inches (cms) -
1 inch = 2.5 cms,
12 inches = 1 foot,
36 inches = 3 feet = 1 yard,
40 inches = 100 cms

Seed Head Thumbnail

Soil

Sun Aspect

Soil Moisture

Foliage Colour
with Foliage Thumbnail

Bulb Use

Comments

PLANTS PAGE
MENU
Introduction
Site Map
 

PLANT USE
Plant Selection
Level 1
Attracts Bird/Butterfly
Photos - Butterfly

Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers
Photos - Bloom per Month

Groundcover Height
0-24 inches
(0-60 cms
)
24-72 inches
(60-180 cms
)
Above 72 inches
(180 cms
)
 

Poisonous Cultivated and UK Wildflower Plants with Photos
or
Cultivated Poisonous Plants
or
Wildflower Poisonous Plants


Rabbit-Resistant Plant
Flower Arranging
Wildflower
Photos - Wildflowers

 


PLANTS FOR SOIL
Plant Selection
Level 2
Info - Any Soil
Plants - Any Soil A-F
Plants - Any Soil G-L
Plants - Any Soil M-R
Plants - Any Soil S-Z

Info - Chalky Soil
Plants - Chalk Soil A-F
Plants - Chalk Soil G-L
Plants - Chalk Soil M-R
Plants - Chalk Soil S-Z

Info - Clay Soil
Plants - Clay Soil A-F
Plants - Clay Soil G-L
Plants - Clay Soil M-R
Plants - Clay Soil S-Z

Info - Lime-Free Soil
Plants - Lime-Free Soil A-F
Plants - Lime-Free Soil G-L
Plants - Lime-Free Soil M-R
Plants - Lime-Free Soil S-Z

Info - Sandy Soil
Plants - Sand Soil A-F
Plants - Sand Soil G-L
Plants - Sand Soil M-R
Plants - Sand Soil S-Z

Info - Peaty Soils
Plants - Peaty Soil A-F
Plants - Peaty Soil G-L
Plants - Peaty Soil M-R
Plants - Peaty Soil S-Z

Following parts of Level 2a,
Level 2b,
Level 2c and
Level 2d are included in separate columns
together with
Acid Soil,
Alkaline Soil,
Any Soil
,
Height and Spread,
Flowering Months and
Flower Colour in their Columns,
and also
Companion Plants to aid this plant Page,
Alpine Plant for Rock Garden Index Page
Native to UK WildFlower Plant in its Family Page in this website

and/or
Level 2cc
in the Comment Column
within each
of the Soil Type Pages of
Level 2

PLANTS PAGE MENU

 


Plant Selection by Plant Requirements
Level 2a
Sun aspect, Moisture


Plant Selection by Form
Level 2b
Tree Growth Shape
Shrub/Perennial Growth Habit


Plant Selection by Garden Use
Level 2c
Bedding
Photos - Bedding
Bog Garden
Coastal Conditions
Containers in Garden
Front of Border
Hanging Basket
Hedge
Photos - Hedging
Pollution Barrier
Rest of Border
Rock Garden
Photos - Rock Garden
Thorny Hedge
Windbreak
Woodland


Plant Selection by Garden Use
Level 2cc Others
Aquatic
Back of Shady Border
Crevice Garden
Desert Garden
Raised Bed
Scree Bed
Specimen Plant
Trees for Lawns
Trees for Small Garden
Wildflower
Photos - Wildflowers


Plant Selection by Plant Type
Level 2d
Alpine
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Herbac Per
Photos - RHS Herbac
Photos - Rock Garden
Annual
Bamboo
Photos - Bamboo
Biennial
Bulb
Photos - Bulb
Climber
Photos - Climber
Conifer
Deciduous Rhizome
Deciduous Shrub
Photos - Decid Shrub
Evergreen Perennial
Photos - Evergr Per
Evergreen Shrub
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Fern
Photos - Fern
Fruit Plant
Grass
Herb
Herbaceous Perennial
Photos - Herbac Per
Remaining Top Fruit
Soft Fruit
Sub-Shrub
Top Fruit
Tuber
Vegetable
Photos - Vegetable

PLANTS PAGE MENU

 


REFINING SELECTION
Plant Selection by
Flower Colour
Level 3a
Blue Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Wild Flower

Orange Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Wild Flower

Other Colour Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Wild Flower

Red Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Decid Shrub
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Herbac Per
Photos - Rose
Photos - Wild Flower

White Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Decid Shrub
Photos - Decid Tree
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Herbac Per
Photos - Rose
Photos - Wild Flower

Yellow Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Decid Shrub
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Herbac Per
Photos - Rose
Photos - Wild Flower


Photos - 53 Colours in its Colour Wheel Gallery

Photos - 12 Flower Colours per Month in its Bloom Colour Wheel Gallery


Plant Selection by Flower Shape
Level 3b
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Herbac Per


Plant Selection by Foliage Colour
Level 3c
Aromatic Foliage
Finely Cut Leaves
Large Leaves
Other
Non-Green Foliage 1
Non-Green Foliage 2
Sword-shaped Leaves

 


PRUNING
Plant Selection by Pruning Requirements
Level 4
Pruning Plants

 


GROUNDCOVER PLANT DETAIL
Plant Selection Level 5
Plant Name - A
Plant Name - B
Plant Name - C
Plant Name - D
Plant Name - E
Plant Name - F
Plant Name - G
Plant Name - H
Plant Name - I
Plant Name - J
Plant Name - K
Plant Name - L
Plant Name - M
Plant Name - N
Plant Name - O
Plant Name - P
Plant Name - Q
Plant Name - R
Plant Name - S
Plant Name - T
Plant Name - U
Plant Name - V
Plant Name - W
Plant Name - XYZ

 


Then, finally use
COMPANION PLANTING to
aid your plant selected or to
deter Pests
Plant Selection Level 6

Acis
"Their flowers give forth an intensely sweet perfume. Garden Culture - Any rich ordinary soil suits them to perfection, thriving equally well in either the open border or shady shrub beds. The bulbs should be planted 4 inches (10 cms) deep and 3 inches (7.5 cms) apart from August to November and need not be disturbed for several years. Propagate by offsets detached from the parent bulbs in September and October. " from The culture of bulbs, bulbous plants and tubers made plain by Sir J.L. Cotter. Published by Hutchinson & Co.

"They are excellent for cutting and make a good display either in a bed or in a thin woodland. They also do quite well in grass, which must not be mown until their leaves begin to die down.
Garden Culture - They seldom do themselves justice at their first time of flowering after being newly planted. Clumps may be left from 6 to 8 years without disturbance." from Black's Gardening Dictionary. Edited by E.T. Ellis, F.R.H.S. Second edition. Published by A. & C. Black Ltd. in 1928.

"Indoor Culture in Window-boxes - Plant in clumps during October, 3 inches (7.5 cms) deep, 2 inches (5 cms) apart. These are excellent for a site in partial shade, but will only succeed if left undisturbed for 2 or 3 years. Suitable varieties are Leucojum aestivum 'Gravetye Giant' and Leucojum vernum." from Indoor Bulb Growing by Edward Pearson. Published by Latimer House Limited in 1953.

Acis autumnalis
- autumn

(Autumn Snowflake, Syn. Leucojum autumnale)

White

aciscfloautumnalervroger1a

August, September,
October
6 petal, bell-shaped flowers in spike. Fragrant

4-6 x 4
(10-15 x 10)
Sand, Chalk. Requires excellent drainage.
Full Sun, Part Shade
Moist

Dark Green grass-like foliage, often being produced shortly after the flower spike.

Plant at edge of bed. Use in rock garden. Cut flower. Thin woodland or shade from shrubs. Naturalize in grass.

In autumn it throws up leafless stems from which it bears 2-4 bell shaped white flowers, often with red bases to them.

Acis autumnalis pulchellum -
autumn

(Leucojum autumnale oporan-themum,
Snowflake)

White

aciscfloautumnalepulchellumrvroger

August, September,
October
6 petal, bell-shaped flowers in spike.
Fragrant

8 x 4
(20 x 10)
Requires exce-llent drainage in Sand, Chalk.
Full Sun,
Dry - Water during growing season only

Dark Green grass-like foliage being produced at the same time as the flower spike.

Plant at edge of bed. Use in rock garden. Cut flower. Thin woodland or shade from shrubs. Naturalize in grass.

Plant with 1 or 2 inches (2.5 or 5 cms) of soil over the tops of the bulbs towards the front of a bed in an area where they can be left undisturbed.

Acis
autumnale 'September Snow' - autumn

(Leucojum autumnale 'September Snow')

Pure White flowers on 4-8 inch stems

aciscfloautumnaleseptembersnowrvroger1

September,
October

6 petal, bell-shaped flowers in spike.
Fragrant

4 x 2
(10 x 5)
Requires exce-llent drainage in Sand, Chalk.
Full Sun, Part Shade
Dry

Dark Green grass-like foliage being produced at the same time as the flower spike.

Plant at edge of bed. Use in rock garden. Cut flower. Thin woodland or shade from shrubs. Naturalize in grass.

Plant with 1 or 2 inches (2.5 or 5 cms) of soil over the tops of the bulbs towards the front of a bed in an area where they can be left undisturbed.

Acis valentinum
- autumn

(Acis ionica,
Leucojum valentinum)

White

aciscflovalentinumrvroger1a

February, March,
April, May
6 petal, bell-shaped flowers in spike.
Fragrant

10 x 12
(25 x 30)
Requires exce-llent drainage in Sand, Chalk.
Full Sun, Part Shade.
Moist

Thin Grey-Green leaves being produced after the flower spike.

Plant at edge of bed. Use in rock garden. Cut flow-er. Thin woodland or shade from shrubs. Naturalize in grass. Coastal conditions

Grows in open, calcareous, stony and rocky places, hill slopes. Requires winter mulch to protect it from the worst of the weather.

Allium callimischon callimischon - autumn

White with Red stripes

alliumcflocallimischoncallimischonrvroger1a

September, October,
November

Umbel

6-12 x 12 (15-30 x 30)

Sand, Chalk
Full Sun
Moist and stop watering when the foliage dies down

Green cylindrical and hollow leaves

These unusual autumn flowering species are ideal on a scree or rockery in full sun. They are hardy and also make nice pot specimens in a cold greenhouse.

Native of the Pelo-ponnese. Plant at soil level and 4 inches (10 cms) apart. All Alliums have the distinctive onion smell, both in the foliage and bulb. This smell can be used to reduce aphid infestations on flowers by planting 1 each side of the infected plant.

Babiana stricta - tender
(Baboon Flower)

Pale Cream through Purple, Mauve and Blue and Crimson

babianacflostrictarvroger1

March, April, May

5 petal, funnel-shaped flowers in a spike with slight fragrance

6-18 x 4
(15-45 x 9)
Sand, or Grow in pots with John Innes No 3 compost in a cool greenhouse.
Full Sun
Moist

Sword-shaped 5 inches (12.5 cm) long, 0.5 inches (1.125 cms) wide, green

babianacfolstrictarvroger1a

Plant against South-facing House Wall in Southern England where temperatures do not go below -5 degrees Centigrade. Mulch with 3 inches (7.5 cms) of organic compost to conserve moisture in the summer.

Set 6 inches (15 cms) deep in average and sandy soils, a little shallower in heavy clay - put 2 inches (5 cms) of sand surrounding bulb to prevent rotting - soils, 6 inches (15 cms) apart. Leave undisturbed for years.

Remove mulch during autumn and winter.

Biarum bovei
- autumn

Dark Green to Dark Brown Spathe

biarumcfloboveirvroger1

September, October, November

Up to 6 inches (15 cm) long spathe but not a flower

4-8 x 12
(10-20 x 30)

Scree, Sand or Chalky soil with 1 inch (2.5 cms) of sand worked into the top 2 inches (5 cms).
Full Sun.
Dry

The 5-10 light green leaves are 1 inch wide and 2-4 inches long.

biarumcfolboveirvroger1a

Can be planted beside a path in a rock garden where it is is a rocky, sandy location in full sun in Southern England.

Biarum is a group of unusual looking bulbs, grown for their weird and wonderful spathes that are produced in autumn. Not fully hardy so these are best grown in pots in the garden before spending the winter in a greenhouse.

Biarum ochridense
- autumn

Light Green with
Purple-Brown interior
Spathe

biarumcfloochridenservroger1

September, October

Up to 6 inches (15 cm) long spathe but not a flower

3-4 x 12
(7.5-10 x 30)
Scree, Sand or Chalky soil with 1 inch (2.5 cms) of sand worked into the top 2 inches (5 cms).
Full Sun.
Dry in summer, but winter moisture is essential.

5-10 light Green leaves emerge in Sep-Oct

biarumcfolochridenservroger1a

Can be planted beside a path in a rock garden where it is is a rocky, sandy location in full sun in Southern England.

Not fully hardy so these are best grown in pots in the garden before spending the winter in a greenhouse.

Biarum tenuifolium
- autumn
(Arum tenuifolium)

Pale Green with Purple Flush Spathe

biarumcflotenuifoliumrvroger1

July, August, September, October, November
Up to 6 inches (15 cm) long spathe but not a flower

10 x 12
(25 x 30)
Scree, Sand or Chalky soil with 1 inch (2.5 cms) of sand worked into the top 2 inches (5 cms).
Full Sun.
Dry in summer, but winter moisture is essential

5-10 light Green leaves emerge in Sep-Oct

biarumcfoltenuifoliumrvroger1a

Can be planted beside a path in a rock garden where it is is a rocky, sandy location in full sun in Southern England.

Native to the central and eastern Mediterranean.
Not fully hardy so these are best grown in pots in the garden before spending the winter in a greenhouse.

Biarum tenuifolium var. abbreviatum - autumn

Bright Green with
Blackish-Purple
interior Spathe

biarumcflotenuifoliumabbreviatumrvroger1a

September

Up to 6 inches (15 cm) long spathe but not a flower

9 x 12
(22.5 x 30)
Scree, Sand or Chalky soil with 1 inch (2.5 cms) of sand worked into the top 2 inches (5 cms).
Full Sun.
Dry in summer, but winter moisture is essential

5-10 light Green leaves emerge in Sep-Oct

Can be planted beside a path in a rock garden where it is is a rocky, sandy location in full sun in Southern England.

Native to Northern Greece and Italy.

Not fully hardy so these are best grown in pots in the garden before spending the winter in a greenhouse.

"The Erythroniums native to the Western U.S. are considered by many to be the most beautiful of the genus.  Often called "Fawn Lilies" because of the dappled coloring to the leaves, they have dainty nodding flowers like small lilies, set off by large shining leaves that are either plain green or marbled with silver and bronze.  Most grow in shaded woodland areas that go quite dry in summer, but with excellent drainage, they can tolerate some summer water." from Telos Rare Bulbs in USA.

"Culture in Garden - They like a damp, well-drained soil, and a partially drained position. The bulbs must not be kept out of the ground any longer than necessary, as they resent being moved, nor must the best results be expected at their first time of flowering. It follows that they should be left alone as long as they flower well. An anual top-dressing of a mixture of light decayed manure and peat benefits them. They are increased by offsets and by seed, which last should be thinly sown in pans in a cold frame in August, and the seedlings grown on for 2 years before planted out in the the open; or if room can be found, in loose soil in a cold frame where they remain until the bloom, when the best can be marked before they are put in their permanent places." from Black's Gardening Dictionary. Edited by E.T. Ellis, F.R.H.S. Second edition. Published by A. & C. Black Ltd. in 1928.

"The largest flower spikes are found where the ground has recently been burnt, so it is possible that a top dressing of potash would have the same effect. If they are to be divided and moved in the same garden this is probably best done when they are beginning to die down after flowering." from Collins Guide to Bulbs by Patrick M. Synge. Reprinted 173. ISBN 0 00 214016-0

"Suitable for cultivation in the garden, greenhouse or house. They succeed in any good well-drained garden soil, but the ideal compost is equal parts loam, peat, leaf mould and sand. The bulbs should be planted in August in a shady position in beds, rock gardens, edges or under trees. Once planted, they need not be disturbed for many years.
For indoor culture the bulbs should be planted 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep and 0.5 inches (1.25 cms) apart in pots in August in the same compost as that recommended for outoor cultivation. The pots should be placed in a cold frame, watered very little until February, and then placed in a sunny window to flower in March. Propagation is best effected by means of offsets in August." from The culture of bulbs, bulbous plants and tubers made plain by Sir J.L. Cotter. Published by Hutchinson & Co.

"Rock Garden Culture for Erythronium citrinum (Yellow flowers); Erythronium Frans Hals (Purple-rose flowers); Erythronium revolutum (Pink flowers); Erythronium Hartwegii (Creamy-white flowers) - Plant in September 1.5 inches (3.75 cms) deep and 4 inches (10 cms) apart, in partial shade, in moist, well-drained sandy loam and ample leaf-mould or peat. Surround the tubers with about an inch (2.5 cms) of silver sand, and do not lift more often than necessary, but mulch annually with well-rotted manure and leaf-mould. Propagate by means of seed in a frame in August. Thin out but do not plant the seedlings out until the third September after sowing. The plants are also increased by offsets." from Rock Gardens how to plan and plant them with sections on the Wall, Paved, Marsh and Water Gardens by A. Edwards in charge of the rock garden, kew. Published by Ward, Lock & Co. in 1929.

Erythronium
dens-canis
(European Dog's-Tooth Violet)

White,
Pink or Lilac

erythrouniumcflo9denscanis1

Each flower stem will have 1-10 downward pointing flowers, with reflexed petals.

April, May, June
April, May, June

Clump.
6 petal,
Star-shaped flowers in a spike

6 x 5
(15 x 12)

Humus-rich Sand.
Part Shade, Full Shade.
Moist

Bulbs must be kept slightly damp during storage and before planting.

The broad, often mottled, mid-Green marbled purplish-
Brown leaves appear first and then the wiry flower stems will come through from the middle.

Erythroniums fit in naturally with Trilliums, Galanthus, Hepatica, Helleborus, Hosta, Pulmonaria, Cyclamen coum and Cyclamen hederifolium.

Grow under deciduous trees/shrubs, in a rock garden, or naturalize in thin grass.

Ideally they like a soil which will dry out in Summer although many will do very well in a normal shady bed or border.

Must receive adequate moisture during early spring when the foliage is making growth. Appreciates additional dressings of fallen leaves when the plant is in woodland gardens.

Erythroniums do best when planted under trees and shrubs - to provide partial shade during the hottest part of the day, in as near to a woodland setting as possible. Plant bulbs 5 inches (12.5 cms) deep in good, rich soil; in the autumn in soil that does not dry out.

If you want to plant them in pots use a John Innes compost rather than a peat based compost. They will be fine in this and should only be repotted when it is absolutely necessary.

 

Erythronium
'Pagoda'
(Trout Lily)

Sulphur-Yellow with brown central rings

erythroniumcflos9pagoda

April, May, June

Forms a large Clump.
6 petal,
helmet-shaped flowers in a spike

12 x 4
(30 x 9)

Chalk,
Part Shade, Full Shade
Moist

Bronze-mottled, glossy, deep green

Plant in pots, woodland or under shrubs in bed. Use as indoor plant in Green-house or sunny window of cool room inside house. Inside Alpine House, or outside in Alpine Trough, or Window-box.

Bulbs must be kept slightly damp during storage and before planting. A good variety to start off with. Received an 'Award of Merit' in 1959. Ideal compost is equal parts loam, peat, leaf mould and sand for pots.

Erythronium
tuolumnense
(Trout Lily)

Bright Yellow

erythroniumcflo9tuolumense1

April, May, June

Forms a large clump.
6 petal,
star-shaped flowers in a spike

12 x 4
(30 x 10)

Chalk,
Part Shade, Full Shade
Moist

Wavy-margined, pale to mid-green.

Plant in pots, woodland or under shrubs in bed. Use as indoor plant in Green-house or sunny window of cool room inside house.

Plant inside Alpine House, or outside in Alpine Trough, or Window-box.

 

Ferraria crispa
- tender

Dark Brown, Maroon and Black

ferrariacflocrisparvroger1

October, November, December

6 petal, star-shaped flowers

16-20 x 16 ( 40-50 x 40)

Well-drained Sand, Scree
Full Sun,
Dry

Suitable for coastal conditions in stony or sandy soil.

Light green leaves overlap each other being up to 12 inches long, with the uppermost surrounding the flowers.

ferrariacfolcrisparvroger1

The corms should be planted 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cms) deep and 6-8 inches (15-20 cms) apart in pots in a frost-free greenhouse during the winter and then the pots can be sunk into a south-facing rock garden during the summer in bold clumps.

It grows in dunes and sandy places in South Africa. Flowers may last only one day, but the plant will continue to produce flowers for several weeks from October to early December.

 

Freesia
Delicate funnel-shaped flowers in spring and summer, surrounded by a fan of light green sword-like leaves, but the main attraction with these bulbs is the sweet fragrance that fills the room. Plant 5cm (2 inches) deep in a loam-based compost mixed with one-third sharp sand in a pot. Keep at 5C and water sparingly until growth begins. Once 7-8 leaves have appeared feed with a foliar feed every two weeks to encourage spectacular flowering." from R.V. Roger. Bring indoors when nightime temperature drops below 9 degrees Centigrade.
Plant against South-facing House Wall in Southern England during September where temperatures do not go below 0 degrees Centigrade during the winter. Set 2 inches (5 cms) deep in average and sandy soils, 3 inches (7.5 cms) apart. Mulch with 3 inches (7.5 cms) of organic compost to conserve moisture in the autumn, remove mulch during the summer. Leave undisturbed for years; move during their dormant period during the summer.
In colder areas, lift corms after foliage dies, store overwinter, and replant in the spring.
Excellent house plants and cut flowers. Good in rock garden and in edge of beds, however, may not be worth time and effort needed if cannot be left in ground.

"For outdoor culture, any light rich sandy soil will suffice, and the bulbs should be planted 2 inch (5 cms) deep and 2 inches apart in August and September. Do not move plants while growing as plants resent being disturbed.
Indoor culture, The bulbs should be planted as soon as possible in August and from then on in fortnightly batches until the end of September. This ensures a good succession from Christmas onwards for some weeks. 5 inch (12.5 cms) pots are the most suitable, and from 6 to 8 bulbs may be planted in a pot (use a deep pot to allow roots to expand) in a compost consisting of 2 parts sandy loam, 1 part leaf mould, 1 part decayed manure, and a liberal admixture of silver sand. In the case of very small or young bulbs as many as a dozen may be planted in each pot.
After potting, the bulbs should be plunged in a cold frame in ashes or fibre refuse until growth commences, which will usually be in about a month. Water should be given sparingly at first, but as soon as growth is really active these plants like an abundant supply. As soon the buds begin to form weak liquid manure may be given once a month. As the flowers fade water should be gradually withheld, and the bulbs permitted to ripen off. When the foliage has quite died down the pots should be stood on their sides in full on some temporary shelf erected near the roof of the greenhouse or some similar structure in order to allow the bulbs to receive a thorough roasting. I feel sure that this is one of the most essential points in connection with the culture of Freesias. All the most successful growers I have known, either professional or amateur, have adopted this method. The bulbs may be left in the pots until August, then shaken out and carefully sorted, the largest being planted together to supply the coming season's bloom, the smaller grown on to form bulbs for the coming season.
The propagation of Freesias is effected by potting on the small offset bulbs at potting time, or by sowing seeds either as soon as ripe or in March and April. Many seedlings will flower the same year, but none should be transplanted until the following season." from The culture of bulbs, bulbous plants and tubers made plain by Sir J.L. Cotter. Published by Hutchinson & Co.

"Pot not more than 5 top-sized corms into a 5 inch (12.5 cm) pot from August and onwards, using John Innes compost or 4 parts sand, 3 parts leaf-mould with 0.5 ounces medium bone-meal mixed in the compost. The pots should then be plunged in a sunny spot in the garden, or frame, and remain there until there is the first possibility of frosts. During this time the corms must develop a good length of leaf. Where there is no garden a peat-filled box set up by a sunny window will do as a plunging ground. In such case it is important to see that the peat is kept sufficiently moist and that the excessive heat through the window does not scorch the potting compost. The window should be kept open in hot weather and at all convenient times.
Water very lightly at all times, but particularly up to the time of flowering. Failure to flower is too often caused by excess water.
Fertilisers - The addition of 0.5 ounce bone-meal to the potting mixture is sufficient until the flower buds are formed. If John Innes compost is used, no fertilisers need be used. Otherwise when the flower buds appear a teaspoonful of a complete fertiliser should be watered into each pot.
Temperature - Many failures are also caused by over-heating. Temperature conditions will give the best results, and heat at no time should be more than 60F (15C), while 50F (10C) is the best.
Position - South window or where the plants will get the maximum amount of light. Care should be taken that the flowering plants are not scorched by sun heat when close to the glass.
Flowering - Mid-January-March, dependent upon the varieties and potting time. It is important to provide support for the plants as soon as the leaves appear. After flowering, and when the leaves have died down, the corms should be allowed to rest until July, when they can be lifted and repotted in August for indoor flowering again. During the resting period no watering need be carried out.
The best general effect is obtained by planting a mixture of varieties, choosing those which will flower at the same time." from Indoor Bulb Growing by Edward Pearson. Published by Latimer House Limited in 1953.

 

The following details come from Cactus Art:-

"A flower is the the complex sexual reproductive structure of Angiosperms, typically consisting of an axis bearing perianth parts, androecium (male) and gynoecium (female).    

Bisexual flower show four distinctive parts arranged in rings inside each other which are technically modified leaves: Sepal, petal, stamen & pistil. This flower is referred to as complete (with all four parts) and perfect (with "male" stamens and "female" pistil). The ovary ripens into a fruit and the ovules inside develop into seeds.

Incomplete flowers are lacking one or more of the four main parts. Imperfect (unisexual) flowers contain a pistil or stamens, but not both. The colourful parts of a flower and its scent attract pollinators and guide them to the nectary, usually at the base of the flower tube.

partsofaflowersmallest1a

 

Androecium (male Parts or stamens)
It is made up of the filament and anther, it is the pollen producing part of the plant.
Anther This is the part of the stamen that produces and contains pollen. 
Filament This is the fine hair-like stalk that the anther sits on top of.
Pollen This is the dust-like male reproductive cell of flowering plants.

Gynoecium (female Parts or carpels or pistil)
 It is made up of the stigma, style, and ovary. Each pistil is constructed of one to many rolled leaflike structures. Stigma This is the part of the pistil  which receives the pollen grains and on which they germinate. 
Style This is the long stalk that the stigma sits on top of. 
Ovary The part of the plant that contains the ovules. 
Ovule The part of the ovary that becomes the seeds. 

Petal 
The colorful, often bright part of the flower (corolla). 
Sepal 
The parts that look like little green leaves that cover the outside of a flower bud (calix). 
(Undifferentiated "Perianth segment" that are not clearly differentiated into sepals and petals, take the names of tepals.)"

 

 

 

The following details come from Nectary Genomics:-

"NECTAR. Many flowering plants attract potential pollinators by offering a reward of floral nectar. The primary solutes found in most nectars are varying ratios of sucrose, glucose and fructose, which can range from as little a 8% (w/w) in some species to as high as 80% in others. This abundance of simple sugars has resulted in the general perception that nectar consists of little more than sugar-water; however, numerous studies indicate that it is actually a complex mixture of components. Additional compounds found in a variety of nectars include other sugars, all 20 standard amino acids, phenolics, alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenes, vitamins, organic acids, oils, free fatty acids, metal ions and proteins.

NECTARIES. An organ known as the floral nectary is responsible for producing the complex mixture of compounds found in nectar. Nectaries can occur in different areas of flowers, and often take on diverse forms in different species, even to the point of being used for taxonomic purposes. Nectaries undergo remarkable morphological and metabolic changes during the course of floral development. For example, it is known that pre-secretory nectaries in a number of species accumulate large amounts of starch, which is followed by a rapid degradation of amyloplast granules just prior to anthesis and nectar secretion. These sugars presumably serve as a source of nectar carbohydrate.

WHY STUDY NECTAR? Nearly one-third of all worldwide crops are dependent on animals to achieve efficient pollination. In addition, U.S. pollinator-dependent crops have been estimated to have an annual value of up to $15 billion. Many crop species are largely self-incompatible (not self-fertile) and almost entirely on animal pollinators to achieve full fecundity; poor pollinator visitation has been reported to reduce yields of certain species by up to 50%."

Freesia alba
- tender
(Freesia lactea)

White
with a
Creamy-Yellow centre.

freesiacfloalbarvroger1a

March,
April,
May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped flowers in a cluster. Very strongly scented.

8-17 x 4
(21-42 x 9)

Sand, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist when growing, bone dry when dormant.

Light Green sword-like leaves

freesiacfolalbarvroger1a1

Bring pot indoors when nightime temperature drops below 9 degrees Centigrade. Excellent house plants and cut flowers.

Native to South Africa. Main attraction with these bulbs is the sweet fragrance that fills the room. If outside, mulch in autumn, remove mulch in summer.

Freesia andersoniae
- tender
(Freesia leichtlinii,
Freesia middlemostii)

Cream to Purple with yellow.

freesiacfloandersoniaervroger1

April, May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped flowers in a cluster. Very fragrant.

8 x 4
(21 x 9 )

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Dark Green

freesiacfolandersoniaervroger1a

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Native to southern coastal areas of South Africa.

Plant against South-facing House Wall in Southern England

Freesia corymbosa
- tender

Pale yellow with bright yellow-orange markings.

freesiacflocorymbosarvroger1

April, May.
6 petal, funnel-shaped flowers in a cluster.
One of the most fragrant, especially in evening. Aside from fragra-nce, has little to recommend it.

12 x 24
(30 x 60)

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Erect, spiral dark green fan, 10 inches (25 cms) long.

freesiacfolcorymbosarvroger1a

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter. Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Native to eastern Cape Province of South Africa.

Plant against South-facing House Wall in Southern England

Freesia elimensis
- tender

Fragrant Ivory White with mauve reverse and yellow markings.

freesiacfloelimensisrvroger1

April, May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped flowers in a cluster.
A sweet scent particularly in evening.

6-12 x 6
(15-30 x 15)

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Dark Green

freesiacfolelimensisrvroger1a

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter. Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Native to South Africa.

In colder areas, lift corms after foliage dies, store overwinter, and replant in the spring.

Freesia speciosa 'Athene'
- tender

Fragrant Ivory-White
with a Yellow throat.

freesiacfloathenervroger1

April, May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped flowers in a cluster.
Very fragrant.

10 x 20
(25 x 50)

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Dark Green foliage held in fan shape

freesiacfolathenervroger1a

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter. Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Introduced in 1957 and recei-ved an 'Award of Merit' in 1962.

 

Freesia speciosa 'Ballerina'
- tender

Fragrant Ivory-White.

freesiacfloballerinarvroger1

April, May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped flowers in a cluster.
Very fragrant.

10 x 20
(25 x 50)

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Dark Green foliage held in fan shape

freesiacfolballerinarvroger1a

Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter.

 

Freesia speciosa 'Bloemfontein'
- tender

Dusky Pink on a
Yellow centre.

freesiacflobloemfontein1a

April, May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped double-flowered flowers in a cluster.
 

10 x 20
(25 x 50)

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Dark Green foliage held in fan shape

freesiacfolbloemfontein1a

Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter.

 

Freesia speciosa 'Chiron'
- tender

Dark Red on a pale
Yellow centre.

freesiacflochironrvroger1a

April, May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped single-flowered flowers in a cluster.
 

10 x 20
(25 x 50)

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Dark Green foliage held in fan shape

freesiacfolchironrvroger1a

Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter.

 

Freesia speciosa 'Clazina'
- tender

Lemon Yellow.

freesiacfloclazinarvroger1

April, May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped single-flowered flowers in a cluster.

10 x 20
(25 x 50)

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Dark Green foliage held in fan shape

Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter.

 

Freesia speciosa 'Corona'
- tender

Yellow.

freesiacflocoronarvroger1

April, May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped double-flowered flowers in a cluster.

10 x 20
(25 x 50)

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Dark Green foliage held in fan shape

freesiacfolcoronarvroger1a

Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter.

 

Freesia speciosa 'Diana'
- tender

White.

freesiacflodianarvroger1

April, May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped double-flowered flowers in a cluster.

10 x 20
(25 x 50)

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Dark Green foliage held in fan shape

freesiacfoldianarvroger1a

Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter.

 

Freesia speciosa 'Epona'
- tender

Red.

freesiacfloeponarvroger2

April, May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped single-flowered flowers in a cluster.

10 x 20
(25 x 50)

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Dark Green foliage held in fan shape

freesiacfoleponarvroger1a

Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter.

 

BULB FLOWER SHAPE GALLERY PAGES


BULB INDEX
link to Bulb Description Page or
link to Page in 4000 x 3000 pixel Raw Camera Photo Gallery or
link to Page in 1000 Ground-cover Plants or
link to Page in Infill Galleries
:-

 

lessershapemeadowrue2a1a1a1a1

alliumcflohaireasytogrowbulbs1a1a

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14c2a1a1

irisflotpseudacorus1a1a

aethionemacfloarmenumfoord1a1a

anemonecflo1hybridafoord1a1a

anemonecflo1blandafoord1a1a

Number of Flower Petals

Petal-less

1

2

3

4

5

Above 5

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a1a1

alliumcflo1roseumrvroger1a1a

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1a1a1a1a1

paeoniamlokosewitschiiflot1a1a1

paeoniaveitchiiwoodwardiiflot1a1a

acantholinumcflop99glumaceumfoord1a2

stachysflotmacrantha1a1a1

Flower Shape - Simple

Stars with Single Flowers

Bowls

Cups and Saucers

Globes

Goblets and Chalices

Trumpets

Funnels

 

digitalismertonensiscflorvroger1a1a

fuchsiaflotcalicehoffman1a1a1

ericacarneacflosspringwoodwhitedeeproot1a1a1a

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming1a1a1

 

 

 

Flower Shape - Simple

Bells

Thimbles

Urns

Salverform

 

 

 

 

prunellaflotgrandiflora1a1a

aquilegiacfloformosafoord1a1a

acanthusspinosuscflocoblands1a1a

lathyrusflotvernus1a1a

anemonecflo1coronariastbrigidgeetee1a1a

echinaceacflo1purpurealustrehybridsgarnonswilliams1a1a

centaureacfloatropurpureakavanagh1a1a

Flower Shape - Elabor-ated

Tubes, Lips and Straps

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Hats, Hoods and Helmets

Stan-dards, Wings and Keels

Discs and Florets

Pin-Cushions

Tufts and Petal-less Cluster

 

androsacecforyargongensiskevock1a1a

androsacecflorigidakevock1a1a

argyranthemumflotcmadeiracrestedyellow1a1a

armeriacflomaritimakevock1a1a

anemonecflonemerosaalbaplenarvroger1a1a

 

 

Flower Shape - Elabor-ated

Cushion

Umbel

Buttons with Double Flowers

Pompoms

Stars with Semi-Double Flowers

 

 

 

bergeniamorningredcforcoblands1a1a1

ajugacfloreptansatropurpurea1a1a

lamiumflotorvala2a1a1

astilbepurplelancecflokevock1a1a1

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a1433a1a1a1a1

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a1434a1a1a1a1

androsacecfor1albanakevock1a1a

Natural Arrange-ments

Bunches, Posies and Sprays (Group)

Columns, Spikes and Spires

Whorls, Tiers and Cande-labra

Plumes and Tails

Chains and Tassels

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades

Sphere, Dome (Clusters), Drumstick and Plate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FURTHER BULB FLOWER SHAPE GALLERY PAGES


Bulbs - a complete handbook of bulbs, corms and tubers by Roy Genders. Published in 1973 by Robert Hale & Company.
Contents

History, Culture and Characteristics

  • Early History
  • Botanical Characteristics of Bulbs, Corms and Tubers
  • Propagation
  • Bulbs in the Woodland Garden
  • Bulbs in Short Grass is detailed in Ivydene Gardens Bulb, Corm, Rhizome and Tuber Gallery Site Map
  • Bulbs in the Shrubbery
  • Spring Bedding
  • Summer Bedding
  • A border of bulbs
  • Bulbs for the alpine garden
  • Bulbs for trough garden and window box-
  • Bulbs for alpine house and frame
  • Bulbs in the home
  • Scent in bulbs
  • Diseases and pests of bulbs and corms

Alphabetical Guide - Pages 154-543 provides an Alphabetical Guide to these bulbs, with each genus having a description with details of culture, propagation and details of each of its species and varieties:-
"Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae)
A genus of three species, native of the Himalayas and eastern Asia, which at one time were included in the genus Lilium. They differ in that their bulbs have few scales, while the seed capsules are toothed. They are plants of dense woodlands of Assam and Yunnan, where the rainfall is the highest in the world and they grow best in shade and in a moist humus-laden soil. The basal leaves are cordate, bright-green and glossy; the flowers trumpet-like with reflexed segments. They are borne in umbels of 10 to 20 on stems 10 to 12 ft (120-144 inches, 300 to 360 centimetres) tall. In their native land they are found growing with magnolias and rhododendrons.
Culture
The bulbs are dark green and as large as a hockey ball. Plant 24 (60) apart early in spring, away from a frost pocket, and with the top part exposed. Three bulbs planted together in a spinney or in a woodland clearing will present a magnificent site when in bloom. They require protection from the heat of summer and a cool root run; they are also gross feeders so the soil should be enriched with decayed manure and should contain a large amount of peat or leaf-mould. The bulbs will begin to grow in the warmth of spring, and by early June the flower stems will have attained a height of 96 (240) or more and will be bright green with a few scattered leaves. The basal leaves will measure 10 (25) wide, like those of the arum. The flowers appear in July and last only a few days to be replaced by attractive large seed pods, while the handsome basal leaves remain green until the autumn. The flower stems are hollow.
Propagation
After flowering and the dying back of the leaves, the bulb also dies. Early in November it should be dug up, when it will be seen that three to 5 small bulbs are clustered around it. These are replanted 24 (60) apart with the nose exposed and into soil that has been deeply worked and enriched with leaf mould and decayed manure. They will take two years to bear bloom, but if several are planted each year there will always be some at the flowering stage. To protect them from frost, the newly planted bulbs should be given a deep mulch either of decayed leaves or peat shortly after planting, while additional protection may be given by placing fronds of bracken or hurdles over the mulch.
Plants may be raised from seed sown in a frame in a sandy compost or in boxes in a greenhouse. If the seed is sown in September when harvested, it will germinare in April. In autumn the seedlings will be ready to transplant into a frame or into boxes, spacing them 3 (7.5) apart. They need moisture while growing but very little during winter when dormant. In June they will be ready to move to their flowering quarters such as a clearing in a woodland where the ground has been cleaned of perennial weeds and fortified with humus and plant food. Plant 24 (60) apart and protect the young plants until established with low boards erected around them. They will bloom in about eight years from sowing time.
Species
Cardiocrinum cathayanum. Native of western and central China, it will grow 36-48 (90-120) tall and halfway up the stem produces a cluster of oblong leaves. The funnel-shaped flowers are borne three to five to each stem and appear in an umbel at the top. They are white or cream, shaded with green and spotted with brown and appear early in July. The plant requires similar conditions to Cardiocrinum giganteum and behaves in like manner.
Cardiocrinum cordatum. Native of Japan, it resembles Cardiocrinum giganteum with its heart-shaped basal leaves, which grow from the scales of the greenish-white bulb and which, like those of the paeony (with which it may be planted), first appear bronzey-red before turning green. The flowers are produced horizontally in sixes or eights at the end of a 72 (180) stem and are ivory-white shaded green on the outside, yellow in the throat and spotted with purple. They are deliciously scented.
Cardiocrinum giganteum. Native of Assam and the eastern Himalayas where it was found by Dr Wallich in 1816 in the rain-saturated forests. It was first raised from seed and distributed by the Botanical Gardens of Dublin, and first flowered in the British Isles at Edinburgh in 1852. Under conditions it enjoys, it will send up its hollow green stems (which continue to grow until autumn) to a height of 120-144 (300-360), each with as many as 10 to 20 or more funnel-shaped blooms 6 (15) long. The flowers are white, shaded green on the outside and reddish-purple in the throat. Their scent is such that when the air is calm the plants may be detected from a distance of 100 yards = 3600 inches = 9000 centimetres. Especially is their fragrance most pronounced at night. The flowers droop downwards and are at their best during July and August. The large basal leaves which surround the base of the stem are heart-shaped and short-stalked."

with these Appendices:-
 

A -
Planting Depths (Out-doors)

B -
Bulbs and their Habitat

C -
Planting and Flowering Times for Out-door Cult-ivation

D -
Flowering Times for Indoor Bulbs

E -
Bulbs with Scented Flowers

F -
Common Names of Bulbous plants

G -
From Sowing time to Bloom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bulbs in Cultivation including vital bulb soil preparation from

Bulbs for Small Garden by E.C.M. Haes. Published by Pan Books in 1967:-

Bulbs in the Small Garden with Garden Plan and its different bulb sections

A choice of Outdoor Bulbs

False Bulbs

Bulbs Indoors

Bulb Calendar

Planting Times and Depth

Composts

Bulb Form

Mat-Forming

Prostrate or Trailing

Cushion or Mound-forming

Spreading or Creeping

Clump-forming

Stemless. Sword-shaped Leaves

Erect or Upright

Bulb Use

Other than Only Green Foliage

Bedding or Mass Planting

Ground-Cover

Cut-Flower
1
, 2

Tolerant of Shade

In Woodland Areas

Under-plant

Tolerant of Poor Soil

Covering Banks

In Water

Beside Stream or Water Garden

Coastal Conditions

Edging Borders

Back of Border or Back-ground Plant

Fragrant Flowers

Not Fragrant Flowers

Indoor House-plant

Grow in a Patio Pot
1
, 2

Grow in an Alpine Trough

Grow in an Alpine House

Grow in Rock Garden

Speciman Plant

Into Native Plant Garden

Naturalize in Grass

Grow in Hanging Basket

Grow in Window-box

Grow in Green-house

Grow in Scree

 

 

Natural-ized Plant Area

Grow in Cottage Garden

Attracts Butter-flies

Attracts Bees

Resistant to Wildlife

Bulb in Soil

Chalk 1, 2

Clay

Sand 1, 2

Lime-Free (Acid)

Peat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bulb Height from Text Border

Brown= 0-12 inches (0-30 cms)

Blue = 12-24 inches (30-60 cms)

Green= 24-36 inches (60-90 cms)

Red = 36+ inches (90+ cms)

Bulb Soil Moisture from Text Background

Wet Soil

Moist Soil

Dry Soil

Flowering months range abreviates month to its first 3 letters (Apr-Jun is April, May and June).

Click on thumbnail to change this comparison page to the Plant Description Page of the Bulb named in the Text box below that photo.
The Comments Row of that Plant Description Page links to where you personally can purchase that bulb via mail-order.

Freesia speciosa 'Fantasy'
- tender

Creamy-White.

freesiacflofantasyrvroger1

April, May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped double-flowered flowers in a cluster.

10 x 20
(25 x 50)

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Dark Green foliage held in fan shape

freesiacfolfantasyrvroger1a

Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter.

Freesia speciosa 'Golden Melody'
- tender

Buttercup Yellow.

freesiacflogoldenmelodyrvroger1

April, May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped single-flowered flowers in a cluster.

10 x 20
(25 x 50)

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Dark Green foliage held in fan shape

freesiacfolgoldenmelodyrvroger1a

Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter.

Freesia speciosa 'Jessica'
- tender

Purple-Red.

freesiacflojessicarvroger1

April, May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped semi-double-flowered flowers in a cluster.

10 x 20
(25 x 50)

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Dark Green foliage held in fan shape

freesiacfoljessicarvroger1a

Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter.

Freesia speciosa 'Magdalena'
- tender

Yellow.

freesiacflomagdalenarvroger1

April, May.

6 petal, funnel-shaped single-flowered flowers in a cluster.

10 x 20
(25 x 50)

Sand, Gravel, or potting compost,
Full Sun,
moist

Dark Green foliage held in fan shape

freesiacfolmagdalenarvroger1a

Excellent house plants and cut flowers, also in rock garden next to house wall.

Bring pot indoors during autumn and winter.

Ixia 'Blue Bird' - tender
(Wand flower, Corn Lily)
The name is from the Greek ixos which is birdlime, referring to the clammy sap of these plants.

Pale Blue and Purple

ixiacflobluebirdrvroger1a1

June, July

Clump.
6 petal, star-shaped flowers in spike

16 x 12
(39 x 30)
Sand.
Full Sun,
Moist

3-5 erect, narrow, sword-shaped, dark green leaves per corm

ixiacfolbluebirdrvroger1

Grow in greenhouse, cool conserv-atory, patio pot, raised rock garden by south facing wall, window-box. Ground cover

In very mild areas, plant out in sandy soil with good drainage and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep coarse bark mulch, in March and then lift in late summer when the foliage has died down. Then, corms should be allowed to become dry.

Ixia 'Castor' - tender
(Wand flower, Corn Lily)

Violet Purple

ixiacflocastorrvroger

June, July

Clump.
6 petal, star-shaped flowers in spike

16 x 12
(39 x 30)
Sand.
Full Sun,
Moist

3-5 erect, narrow, sword-shaped, dark green leaves per corm

ixiacfolcastorrvroger1

Grow in greenhouse, cool conserv-atory, patio pot, raised rock garden by south facing wall, window-box. Ground cover

In very mild areas, plant out in sandy soil with good drainage and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep coarse bark mulch, in March and then lift in late summer when the foliage has died down. Then, corms should be allowed to become dry.

Ixia flexuosa - tender
(Wand flower, Corn Lily, Ixia polystachya)

Pinkish Mauve

ixiacfloflexuosarvroger

June, July

Clump.
6 petal, star-shaped flowers in spike. Slightly scented

24 x 24
(60 x 60)
Sand.
Full Sun,
Moist

3-5 erect, narrow, sword-shaped, dark green leaves per corm

Grow in greenhouse, cool conserv-atory, patio pot, raised rock garden by south facing wall, window-box. Ground cover

In very mild areas, plant out in sandy soil with good drainage and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep coarse bark mulch, in March and then lift in late summer when the foliage has died down. Then, corms should be allowed to become dry.

Ixia 'Giant' - tender
(Wand flower, Corn Lily)

Ivory and Purple

ixiacflogiantrvroger1

June, July

Clump.
6 petal, star-shaped flowers in spike

16 x 12
(39 x 30)
Sand.
Full Sun,
Moist

3-5 erect, narrow, sword-shaped, dark green leaves per corm

Grow in greenhouse, cool conserv-atory, patio pot, raised rock garden by south facing wall, window-box. Ground cover

In very mild areas, plant out in sandy soil with good drainage and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep coarse bark mulch, in March and then lift in late summer when the foliage has died down. Then, corms should be allowed to become dry.

Ixia 'Hogarth' - tender
(Wand flower, Corn Lily)

Cream and Purple

ixiacflohogarthrvroger1

June, July

Clump.
6 petal, star-shaped flowers in spike

16 x 12
(39 x 30)
Sand.
Full Sun,
Moist

3-5 erect, narrow, sword-shaped, dark green leaves per corm

Grow in greenhouse, cool conserv-atory, patio pot, raised rock garden by south facing wall, window-box. Ground cover

In very mild areas, plant out in sandy soil with good drainage and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep coarse bark mulch, in March and then lift in late summer when the foliage has died down. Then, corms should be allowed to become dry.

Ixia 'Holland's Gloire'
- tender
(Wand flower, Corn Lily)

Yellow

ixiacflohollandsgloirervroger1

July

Clump.
6 petal, star-shaped flowers in spike

16 x 12
(39 x 30)
Sand.
Full Sun,
Moist

3-5 erect, narrow, sword-shaped, dark green leaves per corm

ixiacfolhollandsgloirervroger1a

Grow in greenhouse, cool conserv-atory, patio pot, raised rock garden by south facing wall, window-box. Ground cover

In very mild areas, plant out in sandy soil with good drainage and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep coarse bark mulch, in March and then lift in late summer when the foliage has died down. Then, corms should be allowed to become dry.

Ixia 'Mabel' - tender
(Wand flower, Corn Lily)

Pink with Red Blush

ixiacflomabelrvroger1

June, July

Clump.
6 petal, star-shaped flowers in spike

16 x 12
(39 x 30)
Sand.
Full Sun,
Moist

3-5 erect, narrow, sword-shaped, dark green leaves per corm

ixiacfolmabelrvroger1a

Grow in greenhouse, cool conserv-atory, patio pot, raised rock garden by south facing wall, window-box. Ground cover

In very mild areas, plant out in sandy soil with good drainage and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep coarse bark mulch, in March and then lift in late summer when the foliage has died down. Then, corms should be allowed to become dry.

Ixia maculata - tender
(Wand flower, Corn Lily)

Yellow with Purplish-
Black Blotches

ixiacflomaculatarvroger1a

May, June

Clump.
6 petal, star-shaped flowers in a cluster of up to 17 individual blooms

18 x 12
(45 x 30)
Sand.
Full Sun,
Moist

4 erect, narrow, sword-shaped, dark green leaves per corm

ixiacfolmaculatarvroger1a

Grow in greenhouse, cool conserv-atory, patio pot, raised rock garden by south facing wall, window-box. Ground cover

In very mild areas, plant out in sandy soil with good drainage and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep coarse bark mulch, in March and then lift in late summer when the foliage has died down. Then, corms should be allowed to become dry.

Ixia 'Marquette' - tender
(Wand flower, Corn Lily)

Yellow and Purple

ixiacflomarquettervroger2

June, July

Clump.
6 petal, star-shaped flowers in spike

16 x 12
(39 x 30)
Sand.
Full Sun,
Moist

3-5 erect, narrow, sword-shaped, dark green leaves per corm

Grow in greenhouse, cool conserv-atory, patio pot, raised rock garden by south facing wall, window-box. Ground cover

In very mild areas, plant out in sandy soil with good drainage and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep coarse bark mulch, in March and then lift in late summer when the foliage has died down. Then, corms should be allowed to become dry.

Ixia 'Rose Emperor'
- tender
(Wand flower, Corn Lily)

Pink with
Purple centres

ixiacfloroseemperorrvroger2

June, July

Clump.
6 petal, star-shaped flowers in spike

16 x 12
(39 x 30)
Sand.
Full Sun,
Moist

3-5 erect, narrow, sword-shaped, dark green leaves per corm

centaurea montana foliage

Grow in greenhouse, cool conserv-atory, patio pot, raised rock garden by south facing wall, window-box. Ground cover

In very mild areas, plant out in sandy soil with good drainage and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep coarse bark mulch, in March and then lift in late summer when the foliage has died down. Then, corms should be allowed to become dry.

Ixia 'Titia' - tender
(Wand flower, Corn Lily)

Magenta

ixiacflotitiarvroger1a

June, July

Clump.
6 petal, star-shaped flowers in spike

16 x 12
(39 x 30)
Sand.
Full Sun,
Moist

3-5 erect, narrow, sword-shaped, dark green leaves per corm

ixiacfoltitiarvroger1a

Grow in greenhouse, cool conserv-atory, patio pot, raised rock garden by south facing wall, window-box. Ground cover

In very mild areas, plant out in sandy soil with good drainage and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep coarse bark mulch, in March and then lift in late summer when the foliage has died down. Then, corms should be allowed to become dry.

Ixia 'Venus' - tender
(Wand flower, Corn Lily)

Dark Red

ixiacflovenusrvroger1

June, July

Clump.
6 petal, star-shaped flowers in spike

16 x 12
(39 x 30)
Sand.
Full Sun,
Moist

3-5 erect, narrow, sword-shaped, dark green leaves per corm

Grow in greenhouse, cool conserv-atory, patio pot, raised rock garden by south facing wall, window-box. Ground cover

In very mild areas, plant out in sandy soil with good drainage and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep coarse bark mulch, in March and then lift in late summer when the foliage has died down. Then, corms should be allowed to become dry.

Ixia 'Vulcan' - tender
(Wand flower, Corn Lily)

Pink and Purple

ixiacflovulcanrvroger2

June, July

Clump.
6 petal, star-shaped flowers in spike

16 x 12
(39 x 30)
Sand.
Full Sun,
Moist

3-5 erect, narrow, sword-shaped, dark green leaves per corm

ixiacfolvulcanrvroger1a

Grow in greenhouse, cool conserv-atory, patio pot, raised rock garden by south facing wall, window-box. Ground cover

In very mild areas, plant out in sandy soil with good drainage and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep coarse bark mulch, in March and then lift in late summer when the foliage has died down. Then, corms should be allowed to become dry.

Ixia 'Yellow Emperor'
- tender
(Wand flower, Corn Lily)

Yellow with
Purple centre

ixiacfloyellowemperorrvroger1a

June, July

Clump.
6 petal, star-shaped flowers in spike

16 x 12
(39 x 30)
Sand.
Full Sun,
Moist

3-5 erect, narrow, sword-shaped, dark green leaves per corm

ixiacfolyellowemperorrvroger1a

Grow in greenhouse, cool conserv-atory, patio pot, raised rock garden by south facing wall, window-box. Ground cover

In very mild areas, plant out in sandy soil with good drainage and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep coarse bark mulch, in March and then lift in late summer when the foliage has died down. Then, corms should be allowed to become dry.

Lachenalia aloides -
tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Green, Crimson and
Yellow tips

lachenaliacfloaloidesrvroger

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

10 x 12
(25 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

2 broad-to-lanceolate leaves which are dark green with purple markings

lachenaliacfolaloidesrvroger1

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia aloides
aurea -tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Yellow

lachenaliacfloaloidesaurearvroger

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

10 x 12
(25 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

2 broad-to-lanceolate leaves which are dark green with purple markings

lachenaliacforaloidesaurearvroger

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia aloides
quadricolor - tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Red, Yellow, Green
and Purple

lachenaliacfloaloidesquadricolorrvroger

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

8-12 x 12
(20-30 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

2 broad-to-lanceolate leaves which are dark green with purple markings

lachenaliacfolaloidesquadricolorrvroger1

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia aloides
pearsonii - tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Bright Orange edged
with Claret

lachenaliacfloaloidespearsoniirvroger

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

12-16 x 12 (30-40 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green foliage and flower stems with brown markings

lachenaliacfolaloidespearsoniirvroger1

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia aloides
vanzyliae - tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Greenish-White

lachenaliacfloaloidesvanzyliaervroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

4-8 x 12
(10-20 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

2 broad-to-lanceolate leaves which are dark green with purple markings

lachenaliacfolaloidesvanzyliaervroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Very robust

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia bulbifera
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Coral-Red edged with Green or Purple

lachenaliacflobulbiferarvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

6-15 x 12
(15-30 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

2 broad-to-lanceolate leaves which are dark green with purple spots

lachenaliacfolbulbiferarvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.
Useful as cut flower.
Recommended.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

 


The process below provides a uniform method for
comparing every plant detailed in the following galleries with
the ones already compared in the relevant plant gallery
from the last list of plant galleries in this cell:-

These are the galleries that will provide the plants to be added to their own Extra Index Pages

 

 

The following Extra Index of Bulbs is created in the
Bulb Plant Gallery, to which the Bulb found in the above list will have that row copied to.
The Header Row for the Extra Indices pages is the same as used in the 1000 Ground Cover A of Plants Topic:-

A 1, 2, 3, B,
C 1, 2, D, E,
F, G, H, I, J,
K, L 1, 2, M, N, O,
P, Q, R, S, T,
U, V, W, XYZ

 

 

Having transferred the Extra Index row entry to the relevant Extra Index row for the same type of plant in a gallery below; then
its flower or foliage thumbnail will be compared per month in that relevant gallery:-

 

 

Index of Bulbs from
P Infill2 Plants Index Gallery

Further details on bulbs from the Infill Galleries:-
Hardy Bulbs
...Aconitum
...Allium
...Alstroemeria
...Anemone

...Amaryllis
...Anthericum
...Antholyzas
...Apios
...Arisaema
...Arum
...Asphodeline

...Asphodelus
...Belamcanda
...Bloomeria
...Brodiaea
...Bulbocodium

...Calochorti
...Cyclobothrias
...Camassia
...Colchicum
...Convallaria 
...Forcing Lily of the Valley
...Corydalis
...Crinum
...Crosmia
...Montbretia
...Crocus

...Cyclamen
...Dicentra
...Dierama
...Eranthis
...Eremurus
...Erythrnium
...Eucomis

...Fritillaria
...Funkia
...Galanthus
...Galtonia
...Gladiolus
...Hemerocallis

...Hyacinth
...Hyacinths in Pots
...Scilla
...Puschkinia
...Chionodoxa
...Chionoscilla
...Muscari

...Iris
...Kniphofia
...Lapeyrousia
...Leucojum

...Lilium
...Lilium in Pots
...Malvastrum
...Merendera
...Milla
...Narcissus
...Narcissi in Pots

...Ornithogalum
...Oxalis
...Paeonia
...Ranunculus
...Romulea
...Sanguinaria
...Sternbergia
...Schizostylis
...Tecophilaea
...Trillium

...Tulip
...Zephyranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs
...Acidanthera
...Albuca
...Alstroemeri
...Andro-stephium
...Bassers
...Boussing-aultias
...Bravoas
...Cypellas
...Dahlias
...Galaxis,
...Geissorhizas
...Hesperanthas

...Gladioli
...Ixias
...Sparaxises
...Babianas
...Morphixias
...Tritonias

...Ixiolirions
...Moraeas
...Ornithogalums
...Oxalises
...Phaedra-nassas
...Pancratiums
...Tigridias
...Zephyranthes
...Cooperias

 

 

---------

 

 


Bulb Use pages from
P Infill2 Index Gallery


Uses of Bulbs:-
...for Bedding
...in Windowboxes
...in Border
...naturalized in Grass
...in Bulb Frame
...in Woodland Garden
...in Rock Garden
...in Bowls
...in Alpine House
...Bulbs in Green-house or Stove:-
...Achimenes
...Alocasias
...Amorpho-phalluses
...Arisaemas
...Arums
...Begonias
...Bomareas
...Caladiums

...Clivias
...Colocasias
...Crinums
...Cyclamens
...Cyrtanthuses
...Eucharises
...Urceocharis
...Eurycles

...Freesias
...Gloxinias
...Haemanthus
...Hippeastrums

...Lachenalias
...Nerines
...Lycorises
...Pencratiums
...Hymenocallises
...Richardias
...Sprekelias
...Tuberoses
...Vallotas
...Watsonias
...Zephyranthes

...Plant Bedding in
......Spring

......Summer
...Bulb houseplants flowering during:-
......January
......February
......March
......April
......May
......June
......July
......August
......September
......October
......November
......December
...Bulbs and other types of plant flowering during:-
......Dec-Jan
......Feb-Mar
......Apr-May
......Jun-Aug
......Sep-Oct
......Nov-Dec
...Selection of the smaller and choicer plants for the Smallest of Gardens with plant flowering during the same 6 periods as in the previous selection


Fragrant Plants as a Plant Selection Process for your sense of smell from
P Garden Style Index Gallery :-

Bulbs and Corms with
Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5

 

 

Index of Bulbs from
Plants Extra Gallery

Bulb
Photos - Bulb

 

 

Website Structure Explanation and
User Guidelines

 

 

There are other pages on Plants which bloom in each month of the year in this website :-

Lachenalia contaminata
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

White with Maroon tips and stripes

lachenaliacflocontaminatarvroger2

April, May

3 petal,
bell-shaped flowers in a spike

6 x 12
(15 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Grass-like in appearance and plain Green

lachenaliacfolcontaminatarvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia elegans var. suaveolens
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Blue shading to Rose
and White

lachenaliacfloelegansrvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

7-9 x 12 (17.5-22.5 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green

lachenaliacfolelegansrvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions on sandy moist slopes.
Excellent performer in pots.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia 'Fransie'
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Pink shading to Yellow with Maroon tips

lachenaliacflofransiervroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

12 x 12
(30 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green foliage with mid-Green stems spotted Purple

lachenaliacfolfransiervroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia glaucina var. pallida
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Cream with a Yellow or Pale Green Hue

lachenaliacfloglaucinavarpallidarvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

8 x 12
(20 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Dark Green foliage slightly mottled Purple with pale Green flower stems

lachenaliacfolglaucinavarpallidarvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia juncifolia
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

White tinged Red

lachenaliacflojuncifoliarvroger1a2

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

6 x 12
(15 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green foliage with mid-Green stems

lachenaliacfoljuncifoliarvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.
A dwarf species that multiplies rapidly.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia 'Namakwa'
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Orange fading to Yellow, with Pink tips

lachenaliacflonamakwarvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

12 x 12
(30 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green foliage with Orange flower stems

lachenaliacfolnamakwarvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia namaquensis
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Blue shading to Magenta, White internally

lachenaliacflonamaquensisrvroger1a

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike. Very-free flowering

6-8 x 12
(15-20 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green foliage

lachenaliacfolnamaquensisrvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Spreads rapidly by means of long stoloniferous roots. Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England within the UK.

Lachenalia 'Nova'
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Bluish-Green

lachenaliacflonovarvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

8 x 12
(20 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green foliage with Purple flower stems

lachenaliacfolnovarvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia orthopetala
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

White

lachenaliacfloorthopetalarvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

10 x 12
(25 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green grassy foliage with Purple flower stems

lachenaliacfolorthopetalarvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia pustulata
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Cream or Pale Yellow, to Pink or Blue

lachenaliacflopustulatarvroger1

March

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike.
Scented

12 x 12
(30 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green foliage with Purple flower stems

lachenaliacfolpustulatarvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.
Fragrant

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia 'Robyn'
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Red

lachenaliacflorobynrvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped large flowers in a spike

12 x 12
(30 x 30)

Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green foliage with Purple flower stems

lachenaliacfolrobynrvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens.
Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room.
Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. They can be grown as bed edging in only Southern England, Isle of Wight and Channel Islands within the UK.

Lachenalia 'Rolina'
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Creamy-Yellow

lachenaliacflorolinarvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped large flowers in a spike

12 x 12
(30 x 30)
Sand or potting compost, Full Sun, Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green with Purple flower stems

lachenaliacfolrolinarvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens. Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room. Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. Bed edging in only Southern England.

Lachenalia 'Romaud'
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Buttercup-Yellow with Creamy-White tips

lachenaliacfloromaudrvroger1b

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped large flowers in a spike

12 x 12
(30 x 30)
Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green with Purple flower stems

lachenaliacfolromaudrvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens. Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room. Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. Bed edging in only Southern England.

Lachenalia 'Romelia'
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Light Yellow

lachenaliacfloromeliarvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped large flowers in a spike

12 x 12
(30 x 30)
Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green with Purple flower stems

lachenaliacfolromeliarvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens. Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room. Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. Bed edging in only Southern England.

Lachenalia 'Ronina'
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Yellow

lachenaliacfloroninarvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

12 x 12
(30 x 30)
Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green with Purple flower stems

lachenaliacfolroninarvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens. Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room. Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. Bed edging in only Southern England.

Lachenalia 'Rosabeth'
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Red outer petals, inside is Yellow
 

lachenaliacflorosabethrvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

12 x 12
(30 x 30)
Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green with Purple spots

lachenaliacfolrosabethrvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens. Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room. Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. Bed edging in only Southern England.

Lachenalia rosea
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Blue through to Pink

lachenaliacflorosearvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

10 x 12
(25 x 30)
Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green

lachenaliacfolrosearvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens. Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room. Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. Bed edging in only Southern England.

Lachenalia 'Rupert'
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Lilac-Purple

lachenaliacflorupertrvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped large flowers in a spike

12 x 12
(30 x 30)
Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green

lachenaliacfolrupertrvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens. Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room. Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. Bed edging in only Southern England.

Lachenalia splendida
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Blue shaded Lilac

lachenaliacflosplendidarvroger1a2

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

10 x 12
(25 x 30)
Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Light Green

lachenaliacfolsplendidarvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens. Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room. Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. Bed edging in only Southern England.

Lachenalia unifolia
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

White with Blue shading

lachenaliacflounifoliarvroger1

May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

10-12 x 12 (20-30 x 30)
Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Light Green

lachenaliacfolunifoliarvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens. Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room. Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. Bed edging in only Southern England.

Lachenalia viridiflora
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

Blue-Green to Turquoise

lachenaliacfloviridiflorarvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

8 x 12
(20 x 30)
Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green

lachenaliacfolviridiflorarvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens. Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room. Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. Bed edging in only Southern England.

Lachenalia zeyheri
- tender
(Wild Hyacinth, Cape Cowslip, Leopard Lily)

White,

lachenaliacflozeyherirvroger1

March, April, May

3 petal,
urn-shaped flowers in a spike

4-8 x 12
(10-20 x 30)
Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist - during growing period, Sep-Jun, dry in resting period, Jun-Sep.

Mid-Green

lachenaliacfolzeyherirvroger1a

Edging in frost-free gardens. Houseplant in Patio Pot within a sunny but unheated room. Patio Pot or
Hanging Basket in cool Greenhouse.
Enjoys Coastal conditions.

Use either John Innes compost or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 0.5 part leaf-mould and 0.5 part decayed manure, with 1 part coarse sand in pots or hanging baskets. Will not tolerate frost so grow in Greenhouse or as houseplant in a sunny but unheated room. Bed edging in only Southern England.

 

Leucocoryne 'Andes'
(Glory of the Sun)

Mauve with Purple
centre

leucocorynecfloandesrvroger2

May, June

6 petal, umbel-shaped flower in an umbellate. Sweetly scented.

10-14 x 4 (25-35 x 10)

Well-drained Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist during growth in winter and spring of foliage, dry after flowering during rest period.

Grass-like green foliage varies in length from 6-12 inches. Often they are just maturing or even have died down by going yellow by the time the first flowers are seen.

A small genus of only 12 species from the winter rainfall regions of South America. These make excellent pot plants in a frost-free greenhouse or unheated room in the house, and
long lasting, scented cut flower.

Plant in the sloping ground next to a South-facing wall in the Channel Islands or in pots in cold frame or greenhouse for the remainder of the UK.

The bulbs will not tolerate frost.

This plant is resistant to deer!

 

Leucocoryne 'Caravelle'
(Glory of the Sun)
 

Mauve with Plum
centre

leucocorynecflocaravellervroger2

April

6 petal, umbel-shaped flower in an umbellate. Sweetly scented.

12-16 x 4 (30-40 x 10)

Well-drained Sand or potting compost,
Full Sun,
Moist during growth in winter and spring of foliage, dry after flowering during rest period.

Grass-like green foliage varies in length from 6-12 inches. Often they are just maturing or even have died down by going yellow by the time the first flowers are seen.

A small genus of only 12 species from the winter rainfall regions of South America. These make excellent pot plants in a frost-free greenhouse or unheated room in the house, and
long lasting, scented cut flower.

Plant in the sloping ground next to a South-facing wall in the Channel Islands or in pots in cold frame or greenhouse for the remainder of the UK.

The bulbs will not tolerate frost.

This plant is resistant to deer!

 

Massonia echinata
(Hedgehog Lily)

White fading to Pink

massoniacflo1echinatarvroger1

February

Tubular flower
with honey scent

2 x 10
(5 x 25)

Well-drained sand or potting mix,
Full Sun,
Moist when in growing season, dry after flowering

2 wide green leaves about 5 inches long, which lie flat on the ground.

massoniacfolechinatarvroger1a

Makes an attractive and unusual late winter flowering pot. Full Sun in a Conservatory in the UK, where temperatures do not fall below 45 degrees Fahrenheit (7 degess Centigrade) in pot or hanging basket

In well-drained soil (sand) in rock garden within Channel Islands where temperature exceeds 7C, otherwise grow in mixture of 2 parts topsoil, 3 parts peat moss and 7 parts sharp builder's sand in wide pots. Place shards of broken clay pots in the bottom to ensure good drainage.

 

Mela-sphaerula ramosa
(Mela-sphaerula graminea)

Zones 8-10 of Hardiness Zone Map developed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Pale Yellow

melasphaerulacfloramosarvroger1

April, May, June

Tall dainty Gypsophila-like stems are covered with 6 narrow finely pointed petals in small starry flowers within a spray.
A slight scent.

12 x 3-6
(30 x 7.5-15)

Well-drained sand or potting mix,

Part Shade in a Conservatory in the UK, where temperatures do not fall below 45 degrees Fahrenheit.

Moist in growth, dry in dormancy
 

Long, narrow, light green leaves up to !0 inches (25 cms) in length.

Suits pot cultivation in UK Conservatory. Lasts very well as cut flower.

The bulbs will not tolerate frost.

Moisture is necessary at the time of planting in late July-September, but keep barely moist until the foliage is observed. Then, additional amounts of water should be given, but never allow the bulbs to sit in cold, wet soil. Should be a complete resting period in the summer with dry conditions.

Plant 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep and 3-6 inches (7.5-15 cms) apart in the ground next to a South-facing wall in the Channel Islands or 5 bulbs per 10 inch (25 cms) pot and 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep.

Soil - In well-drained frost-free soil (sand) perhaps in Channel Islands, otherwise grow in mixture of 2 parts topsoil, 3 parts peat moss and 7 parts sharp builder's sand in wide pots. Place shards of broken clay pots in the bottom to ensure good drainage.

Grows in sheltered damp places among rocks in southern Africa.

 

Oxalis hirta
'Gothenburg' - tender

Magenta-Pink with
Yellow throat

oxaliscflohirtagothenburgrvroger1

September

8 x 4
(20 x 10)

Light green clover-like foliage, often twisting and closing at night or on very hot days. The foliage is not present during the late autumn and winter, when the plant is dormant.

An outstanding selection with magenta-pink funnel-shaped flowers with yellow throats held above light green clover-like foliage in early autumn. Frost tender, so one for the greenhouse.

This is good for hanging baskets. Plant 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep and 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cms) apart.

 

Oxalis purpurea
- tender

Reddish-Purple with
Yellow tube

oxaliscflopurpurearvroger1

September, October,
November, December,
January

0.5-2 x 4 (1.25-5 x 10)

Light green clover-like foliage, often twisting and closing at night or on very hot days. The foliage is not present during the late autumn and winter, when the plant is dormant.

This is good for hanging baskets. Plant 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep and 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cms) apart.

Oxalis is an enormous family of plants from all over the globe. These in this Gallery are a selection of winter-growing varieties. All are easy to grow and very rewarding with very long flowering times. There are approximately 1919 species.

 

Oxalis lobata

Yellow

oxaliscflolobatarvroger

May, June, July

4 x 4
(10 x 10)

Small tufts of light green clover-like leaves appear in spring and then die down for several months, before re-appearing in early autumn at the same time as the bright yellow funnel-shaped flowers. Foliage is absent in the winter. Mat-forming habit. Deep mulch after autumn foliage has died down to prevent the bulb being frozen.

This is good for hanging baskets. Plant 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep and 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cms) apart.

Frost hardy, this will withstand temperatures down to -5c.

 

Oxalis obtusa

Telos Rare Bulbs in USA have other Oxalis varieties for sale from
Oxalis A-F,
Oxalis G-O and
Oxalis P-Z pages.

Pink with a Yellow centre

oxaliscfloobtusarvroger1

May, June, July

10 x 10
(25 x 25)

Light green clover-like foliage with a silver gloss, often twisting and closing at night or on very hot days. The foliage is not present during the late autumn and winter, when the plant is dormant.

This is a variable winter-growing oxalis from South Africa which produces delicate flowers in a range of pinks and apricots which last for ages. Do not feed to keep the leaves contained.

This is suitable between paving, massed at the front of a low border or in a wall and rock garden, also suitable for window-boxes. Plant 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep and 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cms) apart.

Oxalis are wonderful "collector's items"  --  you know you have been bitten by the bug when, upon seeing their dazzling jewel-like flowers and different leaf forms, you experience an irrepressible urge to possess more!  The South African species are largely winter-growers, brightening the dreary months with their exuberant flowers, then go dormant in summer.  They are best appreciated as container plants, and need sun to open their flowers.

 

Polyxena odorata
- tender

White

polyxenacfloodoratarvroger

October, November

5 x 2
(12.5 x 5)

Light Green, erect, 0.25 inches wide and 4-5 inches high, foliage

Polyxena is a small family of very dwarf bulbs suited to pot culture in a frost-free situation. Can start to flower in the autumn soon after potting. Very uncommon and well worth growing.

This is suitable for hanging baskets in the summer and in coldframes for the rest of the year. Plant 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep and 2-3 inches (5-7.5 cms) apart. Can be grown outside in the Channel Islands in sandy soil. Moisture is needed in early spring, with little or none needed after the foliage dies back in late autumn.

Small, white flowers are held between the leaves with flower fragrance much like that of a hyacinth. The native habitat in Cape Province of South Africa is open, sparse grassland near the coast.

 

Polyxena paucifolia
- tender

Deep Lilac

polyxenacflopaucifoliarvroger

October, November

2-3 x 12 (5-7.5 x 30)

Light Green, erect, 1 inch wide and 4-6 inches in length, foliage

This bulb has clusters of starry-like deep lilac flowers produced at the base of the strappy green foliage.

 

Sparaxis grandiflora acutiloba - tender

 

Sparaxis is derived from the Greek "sparasso" ("to tear"), which refers to the lacerated spathes that surround the flowers

Golden-Yellow

sparaxiscflograndifloraacutilobarvroger

April, May

4-10 x 12 (10-25 x 30)

Flat, stiff and rather tough dark Green leaves 8 inches long are held in a fan shape at the base of the flowering spike.

This is suitable for hanging baskets in the summer and in coldframes for the rest of the year where they can be protected from the frost below 25 degrees Fahrenheit. Plants will withstand a few degrees of frost, but not prolonged cold temperatures. Plant 2 inches (5 cms) deep and 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cms) apart. Can be grown outside in the Channel Islands in sandy soil in bold groups of 25 or more in one place. Moisture is needed in early spring, with none needed after the foliage dies back in late autumn, so that the corms ripen. Great cut flowers, as they are long-lasting.

Sparaxis, native to South Africa, has been in cultivation for over 200 years, due to its ease and free flowering form. As part of the Iris family, brightly coloured flowers are borne above the strappy foliage. Colours range from hot oranges, yellows and pinks to reds and dark purple. Well worth a pot display in fertile gritty loam under frost free conditions.

The plants prefer to be on the dry side in the summer as in their native habitats of South Africa, where they receive their rainfall in the winter.

 

Sparaxis meteler-kampiae
- tender

Deep Violet with
White markings

sparaxiscflometelerkampiaervroger

April, May

6-12 x 12 (15-30 x 30)

Flat, stiff and rather tough dark Green leaves 8 inches long are held in a fan shape at the base of the flowering spike.

This is suitable for hanging baskets in the summer and in coldframes for the rest of the year where they can be protected from the frost below 25 degrees Fahrenheit. Plants will withstand a few degrees of frost, but not prolonged cold temperatures. Plant 2 inches (5 cms) deep and 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cms) apart. Can be grown outside in the Channel Islands in sandy soil in bold groups of 25 or more in one place. Moisture is needed in early spring, with none needed after the foliage dies back in late autumn, so that the corms ripen. Great cut flowers, as they are long-lasting.

Sparaxis, native to South Africa, has been in cultivation for over 200 years, due to its ease and free flowering form. As part of the Iris family, brightly coloured flowers are borne above the strappy foliage. Colours range from hot oranges, yellows and pinks to reds and dark purple. Well worth a pot display in fertile gritty loam under frost free conditions.

 

Sparaxis parviflora
- tender

Yellow and Cream with Purple flush

sparaxiscfloparviflorarvroger

April, May, June

6-12 x 12 (15-30 x 30)

Flat, stiff and rather tough dark Green leaves 8 inches long are held in a fan shape at the base of the flowering spike.

This is suitable for hanging baskets in the summer and in coldframes for the rest of the year where they can be protected from the frost below 25 degrees Fahrenheit. Plants will withstand a few degrees of frost, but not prolonged cold temperatures. Plant 2 inches (5 cms) deep and 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cms) apart. Can be grown outside in the Channel Islands in sandy soil in bold groups of 25 or more in one place. Moisture is needed in early spring, with none needed after the foliage dies back in late autumn, so that the corms ripen. Great cut flowers, as they are long-lasting.

Sparaxis, native to South Africa, has been in cultivation for over 200 years, due to its ease and free flowering form. As part of the Iris family, brightly coloured flowers are borne above the strappy foliage. Colours range from hot oranges, yellows and pinks to reds and dark purple. Well worth a pot display in fertile gritty loam under frost free conditions.

Functional combinations in the border from the International Flower Bulb Centre in Holland:-

"Here is a list of the perennials shown by research to be the best plants to accompany various flower bulbs. The flower bulbs were tested over a period of years in several perennial borders that had been established for at least three years.

In combination with hyacinths:

In combination with tulips:

In combination with narcissi:

For narcissi, the choice was difficult to make. The list contains only some of the perennials that are very suitable for combining with narcissi. In other words, narcissi can easily compete with perennials.

In combination with specialty bulbs:

Sparaxis tricolor
- tender

Red, Orange, and Yellow to White with Red and Gold or Black throat

sparaxiscflotricolorrvroger

May, June, July

12 x 16
(30 x 40)

Flat, stiff and rather tough dark Green leaves 10 inches long and 0.33 inches wide are held in a fan shape at the base of the flowering spike.

This corm has Six-petalled flowers, which are produced on wiry stems in early to mid-summer in a wide range of colours from red, orange and yellow to white. In addition some have a very striking red and gold or black throat. The foliage is narrow and strap-like, up to 25cm long.

Tritonia crocata - tender

Pale Red

tritoniacflocrocatarvroger

May, June

9 x 16
(22.5 x 40)

The stiff, pointed, sword-shaped leaves are held in a basal fan and are shorter than the flower spike.

Tritonia is a small genus of corms from South Africa. Bright flowers are arranged along wiry stems, borne above the grassy foliage. These make a lovely cut flower. The varieties listed in this Gallery are from winter growing regions and so are best cultivated in pots in a frost free situation.

Pale Red flowers are erect and bowl-shaped, 1.5 inches in diameter

This is suitable for hanging baskets in the summer and in coldframes for the rest of the year where they can be protected from the frost below 25 degrees Fahrenheit. Plants will withstand a few degrees of frost, but not prolonged cold temperatures. Plant 2 inches (5 cms) deep and 4-6 inches (10-15 cms) apart. Can be grown outside in the Channel Islands in sandy soil in bold groups of 25 or more in one place in a rock garden. Moisture is needed in early spring, with none needed after the foliage dies back in late summer, so that the corms ripen. In the wild of Cape Province in South Africa, they are found growing in grassy areas where there is considerable moisture during the growing season, followed by a drier period. Great cut flowers, as they are long-lasting.

Tritonia crocata 'Bridal Veil'
- tender

White

tritoniacflocrocatabridalveilrvroger

May, June

9 x 16
(22.5 x 30)

The stiff, pointed, sword-shaped leaves are held in a basal fan and are shorter than the flower spike.

This corm has "pure white bowl-shaped flowers.

Tritonia crocata 'Pink Sensation' - tender

Pink

tritoniacflocrocatapinksensationrvroger

May, June

10 x 16
(25 x 40)

The stiff, pointed, sword-shaped leaves are held in a basal fan and are shorter than the flower spike.

This corm has very pretty pink flowers.

Tritonia crocata 'Serendipity' - tender

Pale Red

tritoniacflocrocataserendipityrvroger

May, June

10 x 16
(25 x 40)

The stiff, pointed, sword-shaped leaves are held in a basal fan and are shorter than the flower spike.

This corm has pale red flowers.

Tritonia crocata 'Tangerine'
- tender

Orange

tritoniacflocrocatatangerinervroger

May, June

10 x 16
(25 x 40)

The stiff, pointed, sword-shaped leaves are held in a basal fan and are shorter than the flower spike.

This corm has hot orange flowers.

Veltheimia bracteata
- tender

The flower stalk is mottled with Purple and is about 18-20 inches in height. Pale Rose and flecked at the tip with Green

December, January,
February, March

veltheimiacflobracteatarvroger

18 x 30
(45 x 75)

About 10 basal leaves are produced, each up to 18 inches long and 4 inches wide, with undulating margins, forming a rosette. Sometimes flecked with pale green, contrasting well with the shiny deep green.

This bulb is one for a sunny windowsill or warm greenhouse but well worth growing. A rosette of long fleshy leaves are produced, from the middle of which a single tall flower spike grows. Up to 50 pink, tubular flowers can be borne, the insides are often spotted yellow. Need a minimum of 5 degrees Centigrade (41degrees Fahrenheit).

Veltheimia bracteata is a native of western areas of the Cape Province of South Africa. This is suitable as a house pot plant. Make sure the containers are large enough so that they can grow for awhile without being repotted. Plant 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep and 6-10 inches (15-25 cms) apart.

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

 

Site design and content copyright ©June 2007. Page structure amended November 2012.
Index changed February 2016.
Mapping and Index completed March 2018.
Menus changed May 2018.
Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

 

The following table shows the linkages for the information about the plants
described in Sanders' Encyclopedia of Gardening in The Gardeners' Golden Treasury, revised by A. G. L Hellyer F.L.S, Editor of 'Amateur Gardening', (thirty-first impression of original published in 1895) was published in 1960 by W. H. & L. Collingridge Limited,
between:-

  • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery (in this Table) and Stage 1 Fragrant Plants (in Table on left), then
  • Stage 2 - 3 Infill Plants Index Galleries (in Table on right), then
  • Stage 3a - All, All3 and All4 Plants Index Galleries with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2 (in this Table)
  • Stage 3b - All2 Plants Index Gallery for Alpines without a Garden for your health and productivity (in this Table)
  • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery (in Table on right)
  • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery (in Table on right) with
    column for Deciduous / Herbaceous plants with the same foliage colour during their growing season and
    column for Evergreen plants with the same foliage colour during the entire year
  • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery (in Table on left)
  • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery (in Table on left)

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY
It would be useful if when you decide to change your garden that you use a uniform garden style throughout your garden and the GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY aims to provide pointers.
The new pages (April 2016) in the gallery will have a suitable list of plants on each page (as that plant gets further detailed in the ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY), then each row containing that plant name in the GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY will also be updated. I aim to input details of plants starting with A in alphabetical order to Z.

Private Garden Design:-
What is your Budget and What are the purposes for your garden?
Designing for a purpose: Areas which require answers before answering your Designing for a Purpose Questionaire.
Then, do the Site Survey with Photographs, before putting the Current Garden Design on paper or in your computer.
Using the Broad Design elements of Scale, which Garden Style to use:-
Low Maintenance Garden Style, Cottage Garden Style, Wildlife Garden Style or Japanese Garden Style and the
Hard and Soft Landscaping elements, create the Broad Proposed Design. Then, the Detailed Design of each Hard Landscaping item followed by the Soft Landscaping elements: The Soil, changing the Microclimate; and the
Plant Selection is influenced by the Colour Wheel, with Plant Quantities determined by time to establish versus width between plants and Companion Planting will provide helpful neighbouring plants
or
Click on text in cells below to jump to that page describing that data.

 


Container

Gardening at my work-place

 

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Yes
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v


Do you want to garden and grow plants?

 

No

Cannot be bothered.
If you wish to improve your productivity and health, then, plant an Alpine Pan in your work area or at home using the information within Alpines without a Garden by Lawrence D. Hills, using these pages:-


Potted
House-plant


<----
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v


No
Garden

At Home with Gard-ening Area


Yes


---->

Balcony Garden or Roof Garden


Yes
---->

Grow flowers for flower arranging and vegetables on Balcony Garden or Roof Garden

Pan Plant Back-grou-nd Colour

STAGE 3b
ALL2 PLANTS INDEX GALLERY

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v


Conservatory Gardening

|
<--
|

 

|
No
-->

Outside Garden
|
v

Pan, Trough and Window-Box Odds and Sods
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14,
15

The beginner's dozen for the small pan

Plants for the pan gar-den


Stovehouse for Tropical Plants

|
<--

An extra dozen for the larger pan

Kinds of Pan Plants that may be split up and tucked in Corners and Crevices

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v

Miniature trees and shrubs for pan

The leafy soil pan

The gritty soil pan

The Limy Soil Plan

Blue Flower Colour Pan Plants

Lilac, Violet and Purple Flower Colour Pan Plants

Reds, Carm-ines Flower Colour Pan Plants

Pinks Flower Colour Pan Plants

White Flower Colour Pan Plants and Bicol-ored

Yellow Flower Colour Pan Plants

Blue Flower Colour Trough Plants

Violet, Lilac and Purple Flower Colour Trough Plants

|
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v

Reds and Carm-ines Flower Colour Trough Plants

Pinks - all shades Flower Colour Trough Plants

Yellow Flower Colour Trough Plants

White and Cream Flower Colour Trough Plants

Bi-colour-ed Flower Colour Trough Plants

Feb Flower Season Pan

Mar Flower Season Pan

Apr Flower Season Pan

May Flower Season Pan

Jun Flower Season Pan

Jul Flower Season Pan

Aug Flower Season Pan

Sep Flower Season Pan

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v

Oct Flower Season Pan

Nov Flower Season Pan

Pans for Semi-shade

Pans for In-doors

Mini-ature Pot

Feb Flower Season Trough

Mar Flower Season Trough

Apr Flower Season Trough

May Flower Season Trough

Jun Flower Season Trough

Jul Flower Season Trough

Aug Flower Season Trough

Sep Flower Season Trough

|
|
v

Oct Flower Season Trough

Nov Flower Season Trough

Dec Flower Season Trough

Bulb Pan

Bulb Cover-ing Carp-eters

Trough and Window-box plants 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Trough and Window-Box Background Colour

Pan Plant
Alpines without a Garden

ABC 1
Pan Plants

DEF 1
Pan Plants

GHI
Pan Plants

JKL 1
Pan Plants

|
|
v

MNO 1
Pan Plants

PQR 1
Pan Plants

STU 1
Pan Plants

V 1
Pan Plants

WXYZ 1
Pan Plants

You need to know the following:-
1. How much time per week are you prepared to look after your garden or prepared to pay someone else to do it for you?
2. How much are you are prepared to spend on creating your garden and then on its maintenance for its feeding and replacement of its plants and hard landscaping?
3. In order for you to go into your garden, there must be mystery in it, so that from any position in the house you cannot see all the garden, otherwise you will not be tempted to go out into it.
4. You must decide what garden style you are going to use THROUGHOUT the garden and make sure of using 3. the mystery in it as well.
5. What plants do you want to keep in your existing garden and incorporate into your new garden?
6. What Human Problems do you have and what Site Problems are there?

A) Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers List leads onto the
B) Bee Pollinated Bloom in Month galleries and
C) extra Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers.


<----

Human Prob-lems
v


---->

Blind,
Deaf,
in a Wheelchair, or
you cannot bend easily

 

 

 

Garden Style, which takes into account the Human Problems above

 

 

Classic Mixed Style


<----

Cottage Garden Style


<----

.
v


---->

Naturalistic Style

Formal English Garden

 

Mediterranean Style


<----

Meadow and Corn-field


<----

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v


---->

Paving and Gravel inland,
Coastal Conditions near the sea, Seashore with shingle/sand

 

 

 

 

Problem Sites within your chosen Garden Style from the above

 

 

Exposure to Wind


<----

Excess Shade


<----

Exce-ssively Dry Shade


<----


<----

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.
.
.
.
v


---->

Exce-ssively Hot, Sunny and Dry Site is suitable for Drought Resistant Plants

Excessively Wet Soil - especially when caused by poor drainage

Control of Pests (Aphids, Rabbits, Deer, Mice, Mole, Snails) / Disease by Companion Planting in Garden

Whether your Heavy Clay or Light Sandy / Chalk Soil is excessively Alkaline (limy) / Acidic or not, then there is an Action Plan for you to do with your soil, which will improve its texture to make its structure into a productive soil instead of it returning to being just sand, chalk, silt or clay.


<----

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.
.
.
.
.
.
v


---->

Problems caused by builders:- 1. Lack of soil on top of builders rubble in garden of just built house.
2. Clay soil of Garden slopes towards house with no drainage of this rainwater by the house wall.

In planning your beds for your garden, before the vertical hard-landscaping framework and the vertical speciman planting is inserted into your soft landscaping plan, the following is useful to consider:-
1. The ground plan usually depends upon 1 or more unalterable existing features. The position of the doors of the house will dictate the positions of paths, the shortest route to the kitchen may indicate the best place for a paved area for eating and drinking out of doors, or the kept trees/shrubs may indicate what garden style is used.
2. Rules of Proportion -
A. A border should be roughly 1/2 as wide as the hedge or wall behind it.
B. The proportion of planted areas to paved or turfed areas should be 1/3 to 2/3, or a 1/4 to 3/4, not 1/2 and 1/2.
C. Within a bed or border, unless a 2-dimensional pattern on the ground is the objective, the height and bulk of the plants should be varied to avoid monotony; it is particularly important to provide strong planting, in terms of either height or bulk or both, at either end of a long bed.
D. The ground surface provides a background to the plants that is as important as the hedges, walls or fences that surround it. Grass is perhaps the most satisfying carpet to use, the cool green forming a restful antidote to the dancing colours of the flowers. Use different coloured pea-shingle inside Cedar Gravel for people in wheelchairs, or infirm in their legs or who suffer from Hay Fever.

Reasons for stopping infilling of Sense of Fragrance section on 28/07/2016 at end of Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey Page. From September 2017 will be creating the following new pages on Sense of Fragrance using Scented Flora of the World by Roy Genders.
ISBN 0 7090 5440 8:-

 

 

 

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v

 

 

 

 

 

After you have selected your vertical hard-landscaping framework and the vertical speciman plants for each bed or border, you will need to infill with plants taking the following into account:-

 

 

 

Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark 1, 2, 3
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil 1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil 1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Sandy Soil 1
, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves 1, 2, 3
Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves 1, 2
Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit 1, 2, 3
Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers 1, 2
Night-scented Flowering Plants 1, 2
Scented Aquatic Plants.
Plants with Scented Fruits.
Plants with Scented Roots 1, 2
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood.
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums.
Scented Cacti and Succulents.
Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell 1, 2

Flower Perfume Group:-
Miscellaneous Group with scents - Balm, Brandy, Cedar, Cloying, Cowslip, Cucumber, Damask Rose, Daphne, Exotic, Freesia, Fur-like, Gardenia, Hay-like, Heliotrope, Honeysuckle, Hops, Hyacinth, Incense-like, Jasmine, Laburnham, Lilac, Lily of the Valley, Meadowsweet, Mignonette, Mint, Mossy, Muscat, Muscatel, Myrtle-like, Newly Mown Hay, Nutmeg, Piercing, Primrose, Pungent, Resinous, Sandalwood, Sassafras, Seductive, Slight, Soft, Stephanotis, Sulphur, Starch, Sweet, Sweet-briar, Tea-rose, Treacle and Very Sweet.

Flower Perfume Group:-
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group with scent - Hawthorn.
Heavy Group with scents -
Jonquil and
Lily.
Aromatic Group with scents - Almond,
Aniseed, Balsamic,
Carnation, Cinnamon, Clove,
Spicy and
Vanilla.
Violet Group.
Rose Group.
Lemon Group with scent -
Verbena.
Fruit-scented Group with scents -
Apricot,
Fruity,
Green Apple,
Orange, Pineapple,
Ripe Apple , Ripe Banana and
Ripe Plum.
 

Flower Perfume Group:-
Animal-scented Group with scents -
Cat,
Dog,
Ferret,
Fox,
Goat,
Human Perspiration,
Musk,
Ripe Apple and
Tom Cat.
Honey Group.
Unpleasant Smell Group with scents -
Animal,
Fetid,
Fishy,
Foxy,
Fur-like,
Garlic,
Hemlock,
Manure,
Nauseating,
Perspiration,
Petrol,
Putrid,
Rancid,
Sickly,
Skunk,
Stale Lint
Sulphur and
Urinous,

Leaf Perfume Group:-
Turpentine Group.
Camphor and Eucalyptus Group.
Mint Group.
Sulphur Group.
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group.
Heavy Group.
Aromatic Group.
Violet Group.
Rose Group.
Lemon Group.
Fruit-scented Group.
Animal-scented Group.
Honey Group.

Scent of Wood, Bark and Roots Group:-
Aromatic Group.
Turpentine Group.
Rose Group.
Violet Group.
Stale Perspiration Group.

 

Scent of Fungi Group:-
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group.
Sulphur Group.
Aromatic Group.
Rose Group.
Violet Group.
Fruit Group.
Animal Group.
Honey Group

Sense of Sight

Emotion of
Hot /Cool; Calm / Agitated

Emotion of
Low-key / High Key


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v

Emotion of
Inviting
/ Forbidding

Emotion of Intellectual versus Emotional

Sense of Touch

Sense of Taste

Sense of Sound

 

 

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 for
lists of plants of 1 plant type for 1 cultivation requirement is in Table on right

 

 

 

STAGE 3a ALL , 3 AND 4 PLANTS INDEX GALLERIES with pages of content (o)
Click on Blue or underlined text to jump to page comparing flower thumbnails of that blue colour in the
Other Plant Photo Galleries. RedPP is Red, Pink, Purple and Other is Unusual or Other Flower Colour.

Plant Type
with links to Other Plant Photo Galleries

ABC

DEF

GHI

JKL

MNO

PQR

STU

VWX

YZ

Alpine in Evergreen Perennial,
Herbaceous Perennial and Rock Garden

1 (o)

1 (o)

1

1 (o)

1 (o)

1

1

1 (o)

1

Aquatic

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Annual/ Biennial

1 (o)
 

1

1

1 (o)

1

1

1

1

1

Bamboo

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Bedding, 25
RHS Mixed Border Beds 75 and
Flower Shape, Flower Colour and Bedding Plant Use

1 (o)

Blue

1

Green

1

Orange

1 (o)

Pink

1

RedPP

1

Purple

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Bicolour

Other Flower Colours

White / Colour Bicolour

Bulb, 746 with Use, Flower Colour/Shape of
Allium / Anemone, Colchicum / Crocus, Dahlia, Gladiolus, Narcissus and Tulip

1 (o)

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1 (o)

Yellow

1

Other

Climber 71 Clematis, 58 other Climbers with Use, Flower Colour and Shape

1 (o)

Blue

1

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Conifer

1 (o)
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Deciduous Shrub 43 with Use and Flower Colour

1 (o)

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Deciduous Tree

1 (o)
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Evergreen Perennial 104 with Use, Flower Colour, Flower Shape and Number of Petals

1 (o)

Blue

1

1

1

1 (o)

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Evergreen Shrub 46, Semi-Evergreen Shrub and Heather 74 with Use and Flower Colour

1 (o)

Blue

1 (o)

1

1 (o)

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Evergreen Tree

1 (o)
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Fern with 706 ferns
within 21 types and 41 uses

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Grass

1

1

1
 

1 (o)

1

1

1

1

1

Herbaceous Perennial 91,
RHS Mixed Border Beds 176 and
Peonies 46 with Flower Colour/Shape

1

Blue

1

1

1 (o)

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Herb

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Odds and Sods

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Rhododendron, Azalea, Camellia

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Rose with 720 roses within Flower Colour, Flower Shape, Rose Petal Count and Rose Use

1

1

1